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Eukanuba Indoor Formula

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for info/opinions on Euckanuba Indoor Formula. We received a huge supply of it as a donation for the foster kitties and some has been passed on to me. Our TNR coordinator has recommended mixing it 50/50 with the dry food I currently feed - Purina One Chicken & Rice. She feeds her own cats a mix of several premium foods and has had good results. Any thoughts? Thanks!
post #2 of 19
truthfully I think purina one is a bit better than Eukanuba since it has no chemical pres ...

Chicken, Chicken By-Product Meal, Chicken Liver, Corn Grits, Corn Meal, Ground Whole Grain Sorghum, Fish Meal (source of fish oil), Dried Beet Pulp (sugar removed), Powdered Cellulose, Natural Chicken Flavor, Dried Egg Product, Chicken Fat (preserved with mixed Tocopherols, a source of Vitamin E, and Citric Acid), Brewers Dried Yeast, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, DL-Methionine, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Niacin, Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate (source of vitamin B1), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (source of vitamin B6), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement (source of vitamin B2), Inositol, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid), Salt, Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Cobalt Carbonate), L-Carnitine, Rosemary Extract

Caloric Distribution
This information is not yet available.

Guaranteed Analysis

Nutrient (percent)
Crude Protein not less than 30.0%
Crude Fat not less than 12.0%
Crude Fat not more than 14.50%
Crude Fiber not more than 8.0%
Moisture not more than 10.0%
Ash not more than 7.0%
Magnesium not more than 0.12%
Vitamin E not less than 250 IU/kg
Taurine not less than 0.15%
L-Carnitine not less than 40 mg/kg*
Omega-6 Fatty Acids not less than 1.50%
Omega-3 Fatty Acids not less than 0.30%

here is purina one chn and rice

CRUDE PROTEIN (MIN) 34.0%



CRUDE FAT (MIN) 13.0%



CRUDE FIBER (MAX) 2.0%



MOISTURE (MAX) 12.0%



ASH (MAX) 7.0%



LINOLEIC ACID (MIN) 1.4%



CALCIUM (Ca) (MIN) 0.8%



PHOSPHORUS (P) (MIN) 0.7%



MAGNESIUM (Mg) (MAX) 0.09%



SELENIUM (Se) (MIN) 0.30 mg/kg



VITAMIN A (MIN) 11,000 IU/kg



VITAMIN E (MIN) 100 IU/kg



TAURINE (MIN) 0.15%




Ingredients

Chicken, brewers rice, corn gluten meal, poultry by-product meal, wheat flour, animal fat preserved with mixed-tocopherols (form of Vitamin E), wheat gluten, whole grain corn, non-fat yogurt, fish meal, brewers dried yeast, potassium chloride, phosphoric acid, malted barley flour, animal digest, tetra sodium pyrophosphate, calcium carbonate, salt, L-Lysine monohydrochloride, choline chloride, taurine, zinc sulfate, Vitamin E supplement, ferrous sulfate, manganese sulfate, niacin, Vitamin A supplement, calcium pantothenate, thiamine mononitrate, copper sulfate, riboflavin supplement, Vitamin B-12 supplement, pyridoxine hydrochloride, folic acid, Vitamin D-3 supplement, calcium iodate, biotin, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of Vitamin K activity), sodium selenite.
D-4153

You can see which has more corn , cellulose and by products ...
post #3 of 19
Eukanuba always worked well for my cat but that was before I went ingrediant nuts. I was always impressed with the moisture and how fresh it seemed in comparison to other kibbles. I've got one cat who started his first 3 years on Iams and has been on Eukanuba since then for the rest of his life and he is now 12 and doing really well with no health problems at all. I get free Eukanuba since I have a vet student friend who can get free bags of food once a month. Clover's no longer under my care otherwise he'd be on raw but my dad appreciates the free food.

I wasn't aware Purina One was that good...maybe I'll start recomending it to friends.
post #4 of 19
Here's a side-by-side comparison, though of Eukanuba's regular formula, not the indoor one:
http://naturapet.com/display.php?d=c...id4=&x=48&y=13; here are the ingredients of the indoor formula: Chicken, Chicken By-Product Meal, Chicken Liver, Corn Grits, Corn Meal, Ground Whole Grain Sorghum, Fish Meal (source of fish oil), Dried Beet Pulp (sugar removed), Powdered Cellulose, Natural Chicken Flavor, Dried Egg Product, Chicken Fat (preserved with mixed Tocopherols, a source of Vitamin E, and Citric Acid), Brewers Dried Yeast, Potassium Chloride, Calcium Carbonate, DL-Methionine, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Acetate, Niacin, Ascorbic Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, Biotin, Thiamine Mononitrate (source of vitamin B1), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (source of vitamin B6), Vitamin B12 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement (source of vitamin B2), Inositol, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid), Salt, Choline Chloride, Minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Manganese Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Cobalt Carbonate), L-Carnitine, Rosemary Extract

I don't see a great deal of difference in the foods, but would choose Eukanuba over Purina because the first three ingredients make it appear that it has more animal than vegetable protein, whereas Purina lists rice in second place. Many people do make their own "mix" of dry food. I would make the change gradually, i.e., start out with 10% Eukanuba to 90% Purina, and increase it to 20% - 70% after a few days, etc., since one or more of your cats might react to a quick change with an upset stomach or diarrhea.
I for one advocate feeding more than one brand of food, because you can never know when a food will be changed, become unavailable, not "sit well" with a cat, etc.. It's more difficult to get a cat used to one brand only to switch to a prescription diet if she becomes ill.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I for one advocate feeding more than one brand of food, because you can never know when a food will be changed, become unavailable, not "sit well" with a cat, etc.. It's more difficult to get a cat used to one brand only to switch to a prescription diet if she becomes ill.
Will this make them finicky eaters?

P.S. jcat, the new siggy is very cute!
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurrPaws
Will this make them finicky eaters?

P.S. jcat, the new siggy is very cute!
Yes, they may refuse to eat anything but their "regular" brand, which can lead to real problems. Most food producers would have you believe that it's unhealthy for your cat or dog to eat more than one brand, because they want to encourage loyalty to their brand. More and more feline nutrition advisers are saying you should give a variety of foods for a more balanced diet, and to prevent the cat from becoming too finicky.
P.S. HopeHacker made the siggy!
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the feedback. Sounds like it will be a good mix.
post #8 of 19
I for one although they are a decent food am no longer a huge Euk fan. but thats just because when they got bought out by the big guys they changed their food ALOT..mayhbe more so in the dogs than the cats...but if it works..it works..dont argue to much with it.
post #9 of 19
We feed a good quality dry food - about 1/2 - 3/4 cup per day for both cats to share and I've been feeding wet morning and night. I have been buying different brands of wet food WITH NO BY-PRODUCTS and vary them each day so that they aren't eating just one kind. They do prefer some over others, but will eat what I put out.

I've often thought the same as the poster above that if the cat gets sick it's nice to be able to offer them something else that they will eat.

I wonder if our Simba had been used to more than one food we could have enticed him to eat something else to keep his liver from failing fully. We tried forcefeeding and it was awful.
post #10 of 19
I am not a huge fan of Eukanuba but it's not the worst stuff out there. It's about on par with Purina One. There are definitely better foods available but there is no reason not to use the donated food.

However, with the cold weather coming up I would hesitate to use it for feral cats, just because an "indoor cat" formula would be designed to minimize weight problems for cats who live indoors in climate controlled environments. Also, "indoor cat" adult formulas are not at all suitable for kittens. Feral cats are much more active and need the extra calories, especially with winter coming on. So if possible I would use something else to feed outdoor cats but for adult cats who live indoors (even if they go outside sometimes), I think it would be just fine.
post #11 of 19
i'm not a huge Eukanuba fan (long story). my guys get Sensible Choice for their kibble right now.

but my mom and my sister both feed their cats Eukanuba Indoor kibble and their cats do ok. i would watch out for this ingredient: Powdered Cellulose . one of my cats doesn't tolerate this ingredient. found that out when we tried some "diet" cat food formulas. he hurls anything with that ingredient in it. tried a couple different "lite" foods that had this, so it wasn't just one food. LOL. that was my lesson in not feeding "diet" cat food.

most likely your cats will do fine...i would just watch for the usual signs of not tolerating a new food.
post #12 of 19
I used a bag of Eukanuba kitten not long ago. Marlee loved it! But after getting some opinions from people on here, my next bag was Nutro kitten. Marlee likes it a lot too, but it took her a week or so to really get used to it, even with the mixing. Its also nice that the Nutro is a little cheaper! But Marlee seemed to do just as well when she was on Eukanuba, so use what works well for you and your kitties.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurrPaws
Will this make them finicky eaters?

P.S. jcat, the new siggy is very cute!
It definitely can. It's not guaranteed because certainly different cats have different temperaments, but many cats will become finicky if given only one type of food.

This isn't such a big deal as long as your cat remains healthy but health problems like kidney disease and diabetes are very, very common in older cats. Diet is a cornerstone of treatment for both of these conditions. If your cat has become too much of a creature of habit with his food, then you will have a very difficult time making the switch to a special diet. This is a major stress for both you and the cat especially on top of a newly diagnosed illness and adjusting to a medication schedule, possibly learning how to give injections, etc. So getting your cat used to a variety of canned and dry foods as early in life as possible is a simple way to make things much easier on both of you if a health problem does develop down the line.
post #14 of 19
When our cats were kittens I fed them Eukanuba Kitten and they loved it. Then when they were older I switched to Nutro Natural Choice, but have receintly gone to Purina One. I still do buy a bag of the Euk. Kit. once in awhile....just so Dad can give them a little bit as a "treat" when he first comes home from work, (since they like it so well ...better than any other treats that are sold as such.)
Linda
post #15 of 19
I wonder if our Simba had been used to more than one food we could have enticed him to eat something else to keep his liver from failing fully. We tried forcefeeding and it was awful.[/quote]

I agree that there is nothing worse than forcefeeding, it really is heart beaking. I bought a bag of Euk from the vets but now I am concerned that I should be feeding them something else. I usually feed them Royal Canin but I ran out and decided to feed them euk.

Can I ask what food you feed your cats? I wanted to search the site for the best cat food but sinc searching has been disabled I can't do that. So I'm sorry if I am hijacking this thread!
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sims2fan
Can I ask what food you feed your cats? I wanted to search the site for the best cat food but sinc searching has been disabled I can't do that. So I'm sorry if I am hijacking this thread!
Somebody beat you to that question! http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=68832
I doubt that there's any answer to the question of what the best cat food is. Basically, it depends on your cat(s), what they'll eat, and whether any allergies or health problems are involved. Saying that Brand X dry food is the best doesn't help someone whose cat won't eat dry food, or recommending a canned brand that a young, healthy cat does well on might not be advisable if the inquirer has a senior cat with renal problems.
post #17 of 19
I fed Eukanuba puppy food to Misty when she was pregnant. I thought it was an excellent food, and if it wasn't so darned expensive, I would have kept her on Eukanuba even after she weaned her pups.

I haven't looked at the details, but I'm sure it is find to feed them the Eukanuba kitty food.
post #18 of 19
I think the best food is whatever quality brand with few or preferrably no by-products and few fillers your cats will eat and enjoy is the best food.

I've tried different brands of high quality food and Bijou and Mika don't like a lot of them, so I'm going with the brand or two that they do like.

IMO, it's better to feed them what they will eat and enjoy than to try to get them to eat something just because someone says it's better than something else. Just use your common sense, read the labels and choose the best quality you can get them to eat. If they don't like something and aren't eating it very well, that would IMO be worse for them than letting them eat what they like.
post #19 of 19
Incidentally, I just learned that Eukanuba is now available as a wet food (cans and pouches).
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