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Trader Joe's Cat Food? - Page 2

post #31 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post
Contains Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol, which is toxic to the liver. Do not feed.

Oh, erm, the thread went off topic. This was in response to the original TJ's food we were talking about.

( Did you notice that the original post was in 2005?
Long live the TJ's Thread. )

I'm looking at the ingredients for the CANned food - the Turkey & Giblets Dinner - and there's no menadione dimethylpyrimidinol listed. Were you talking about just the TJ's Dry cat food?

The TJ's cat canned food gets a positive review, no mention of MD.

http://www.consumersearch.com/cat-food/canned-cat-food
Quote:
Trader Joe's, a grocery store chain with outlets in many parts of the country, has a private label cat food that's earned some kudos. For example, CatInfo.org's Lisa Pierson puts it on her list of high-quality canned foods with grains but no wheat, corn or soy, though she adds that she has not reevaluated the food in several years and advises her readers to examine the label on their own before buying. The store's Chicken, Turkey & Rice Dinner (*Est. 60 cents for a 5.5-oz. can) lists chicken broth, chicken, turkey and ocean fish as its first four ingredients. User discussion is limited, but all we've seen is positive, and Trader Joe's cat food gets a good score from those posting at ZooToo.com.
post #32 of 78
I was just looking at what the original poster Lionessranmpant listed as the ingredients for the dry food she was looking at when she went to TJ's.

And lol, no I didn't notice how old the post was from. xD

The canned food seems to check out fine with me.
post #33 of 78
i bought 20 TJ cans of cat food,tune,one of my cats loves it.

i noticed TJ had two cases of the cat food on the shelf. do they sell it by the case? or did they a stock person forget to open and shelf the cans.

if they sell it by the case,is it discounted? I live 2 hours from the nearest TJ
post #34 of 78

I've tried to find feeding guidelines for trader joe's wet food, along with Kcal info, but can find neither. If anyone has a good link or know the calorie counts f the turkey & gibs wet food (5.5oz) I'd be much obliged!

post #35 of 78

I call ahead and ask them to reserve cases for me.  They have no problem with doing that for me.

post #36 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by unigeezer View Post

I've tried to find feeding guidelines for trader joe's wet food, along with Kcal info, but can find neither. If anyone has a good link or know the calorie counts f the turkey & gibs wet food (5.5oz) I'd be much obliged!


Is there not a phone number on the can to call with questions?  That would be my suggestion is there are no feeding instructions.  How strange, though.  Did you get out your magnifying glasses to make sure you didn't just miss them laughing02.gif?

 

post #37 of 78

I response to the issue of cats with Struvite Crystals, one of my cats was diagnosed that way and my vet pushed the Hill's on us. I flat out told her I refused to feed him that and brought her several cans of wet food that I considered OK for him. She agreed that Wellness would be fine and 5 years later he hasn't had any issues since. 

 

If you have a cat with crystal issues, you should really talk to your vet and demand a better food option than Hill's. 

 

I've compared the Wellness and the TJ's brand foods and they are very similar in all the % contents with only 1% less protein and .5% less taurine. And less ash which if memory serves is better for cats with crystals. Switching my cats over this week.

post #38 of 78

I like the TJs wet food. I mostly feed my cat's grain free wet food but I do also use TJs to help even out the cost of it, and with the exception of it containing some grain, I think it's  a decent wet food and my cat likes it.  And yes it has a lower ash content than S/D. I remember talking to my vet about foods to feed my cat when I first got him and he was dissing all the brands I was mentioning (mostly premium, holistic, grain-free foods) and saying their ash content was too high and the cat should eat S/D. I then looked at the ash content on the foods and it was the SAME AS or LOWER than S/D. So he obviously did not know what he was talking about. I like that vet because he's great with my cat and he's good in other way, but I don't go to him for nutrition advice. There's a newer vet at this same place and whenever I've gone to her she doesn't push the S/D and she's fine with some raw feeding as well as grain-free wet food feeding and doesn't try to get you to feed the cat S/D. I'll have to ask her about some of the foods next time I'm there.

 

I don't feed dry food (other than a few kibbles of Blue Buffalo Wilderness duck formula as a treat) so can't comment on their dry food. (though by the ingredients shown it does not sound all that great - not as bad as some, but nothing I'd rave about either). 

post #39 of 78
Is TJ sold in Canada? It looks good for my feral kitties and I haven't seen it around.
post #40 of 78
Sorry to repeat this ... BUT ... the DRY FOOD ingredients are NOT great - it's the CANNED food that has good ingredients.

Not sure about TJ's in Canada - but you could do a Google Search.
http://www.traderjoes.com/
they need a zip code at their website ... so ???
post #41 of 78

I can't understand why people do not yet get it that dry pet food is pure crap. Even most vets I talk to seem to accept that people would feed this.  It is like giving your beloved pet a death sentence.

post #42 of 78

Hi,

 

Does anyone know what the Trader Joe's cat food looks like?  My cat hate pate, they prefer to sink their teeth in actual meats.

post #43 of 78

it's pate

post #44 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bekahsa View Post

Hi,

Does anyone know what the Trader Joe's cat food looks like?  My cat hate pate, they prefer to sink their teeth in actual meats.

The style of the food (pate, shredded, chunks etc) is not indicative of how much meat is in the food. Some pates have more actual meat than some chunks. Those chunks could be made up of anything. You have to read the labels to know how much real (identified) meat is in the food.

Some cats will eat pate if it is mixed with a little water and made into a gruel or even a gravy. Other cats will eat it if you make the gruel, plus leave chunks of the pate (some pates are stiff enough to leave chunks, some aren't)

However there are plenty of choices of good quality chunks and gravy styles to choose from, though I know, with a 'finicky' cat, that still can present a challenge. smile.gif
post #45 of 78

http://www.catinfo.org/docs/Food%20Chart%20Public%209-22-12.pdf

 

Control f to find trader joe's. This lady is a vet and has spent hours (even days perhaps) compiling the nutritional content of various cat foods. One of my cats recently had struvite crystals but he absolutely hates the hill's junk (I can't blame him.. it smells awful!) I think I'm going to give him trader joe's stuff because it's lower in phosphorous and carbs. Read her website for more details. Good luck!

post #46 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by kittylover23 View Post

Is TJ sold in Canada? It looks good for my feral kitties and I haven't seen it around.

 

Yes, Trader Joe's is available in Canada. Here in Vancouver, Tisol and Bosley's carry it. I've seen the wet.

 

jlc20m

post #47 of 78

I mix the TJs tuna with Walmart's generic chicken broth. My cat loves this so much, and its a great way to get extra liquids into her. She was pretty chubby when I got her, and now that she is eating mostly wet food, she's lost some weight. (no, she doesn't exclusively eat tuna, but there's nothing she loves more, especially with the broth added).

post #48 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant View Post

So, I went to Trader Joe's today (aka, the store I love to love), mostly because it is about 10 times cheaper than Whole Foods Market and has many of the same things availible for people.

Today, I stumbled uopn their cat food. Right now, Lola is in the kitchen pounding down some of their wet food...she appears to love it (the saice especially) and instead of looking like some unidentified meat-related product, it has REAL crab meat in it. Smells good, even to me! The ingredients list checks out for me and as far as I'm concerned, I'm feeding the cat meat I can identify...that's ok by me! It's also WAY cheaper than anything else I've fed, coming in at .59 per 5.5 oz can.

Then, there is the question of dry food. I just switched them, and they're doing fine on Nature's Variety, but TJ's sells a brand of cat food with a nearly identical ingredients list (actually, the TJ's cat food has more meat and meat-meal sources) for much cheaper. It's made by and company called Bench and Field and it's called Holistic Natural Feline. The website is here: http://www.benchandfield.com Anyone had any experience with this that they can tell me about?

kroger has cat food for .39 for 5.5 oz <petpride

post #49 of 78

Zanamu -

 

Quote:
I mix the TJs tuna with Walmart's generic chicken broth. My cat loves this so much, and its a great way to get extra liquids into her. She was pretty chubby when I got her, and now that she is eating mostly wet food, she's lost some weight. (no, she doesn't exclusively eat tuna, but there's nothing she loves more, especially with the broth added)."

 

 

Doesn't chicken broth have a lot of sodium?  I read that sodium is REALLY bad for cats!

post #50 of 78

I'd imagine you'd have to read the label for the sodium content.  I always buy low sodium chicken broth to cook with for us at home, it's widely available at least where I shop.  I would hope they use that kind for canned cat food.  

post #51 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minka View Post

Contains Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol, which is toxic to the liver. Do not feed.

Oh, erm, the thread went off topic. This was in response to the original TJ's food we were talking about.

You know, I don't see any of the things listed by the FDA that might be listed on a label that actually were Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol (see below), so I disagree with your 'do not feed' thinking.

 

 

just for reference - here's a quote from the About.com website:

 

Definition: Menadione Sodium Bisulfite Complex is a synthetic pet food ingredient which stimulates the production of vitamin K in an animal's body. Although it is technically not vitamin K, it is substituted for vitamin K in some pet food formulas, as it is inexpensive compared to sources of vitamin K, such as kelp, seaweed, alfalfa, and green leafy vegetables. Its use in pet foods is controversial, however many pet food experts have come out against it. The FDA has no regulation preventing such use.
Pronunciation: men-uh-dy-own so-dee-um by-sul-fayt com-plex
Also Known As: menadione, sodium sulfate, Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol Bisulfite, Vitamin K3, Vitamin K Active Substances (VKAS)
post #52 of 78

To all of you dry cat food feeders out there, please, please note that cats do not DRINK enough water for proper hydration. They get most of their water from their food. I have found that, feeding my cats TJ's wet turkey and or chicken canned foods, diluted with no sodium chicken broth, has been the best thing ever to cure them of hairballs and clear the kidneys, and they LOVE it. I will not feed my cats a fish-based wet food (especially tuna), as cats do not eat it naturally, and tuna has its own health issues attached, one of which is mercury. (I was grateful to learn this, actually, because the fish-based wet foods stink, too!) I would feed my cats a raw food diet if I could figure out a way to make it work with indoor cats and a full-time job, but as a second-best alternative I am feeding them the above-mentioned mixture, plus a bowl of water plus (for now) a little bit of Origen Cat & Kitten. I no longer trust the likes of Science Diet and Royal Canin for kidney crystals. Origen has the highest meat-based protein content that I have found, and I still don't give them much of it, just enough to satisfy their enjoyment of crunchy food, since they don't have bird bones to gnaw on. 

 

To sum up, after about a month on this regimen, my cats - who were barfing up hairballs constantly - have barfed no more than twice since this regimen started. This is a HUGE improvement, and far more successful than ANY hairball remedy or hairball teats I have tried. My male cat has been treated for crystals before, and when he started behaving oddly a couple of months ago I had the vet run tests and there was no sign of crystals (and he was given antibiotics doh3.gif) in case of a UTI. We never found out what the problem had been, but his behaviour has corrected, in addition to the complete absence of hairball issues.

 

Dry food diet is not healthy for cats, as they will not get anywhere near adequate hydration from the amount of water they will drink. I am grateful to have found TJ's wet food, as it seems to be very high quality and the price is so reasonable. My cats love it, and they are happy and hydrated on it. In the absence of a raw food diet, I feel pretty confident that I am doing the best that I can for them. I wish I had known this sooner!

post #53 of 78

They love tuna, but it isn't good for them. I have successfully substituted low / no sodium chicken broth.

post #54 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Path View Post

To all of you dry cat food feeders out there, please, please note that cats do not DRINK enough water for proper hydration. They get most of their water from their food. I have found that, feeding my cats TJ's wet turkey and or chicken canned foods, diluted with no sodium chicken broth, has been the best thing ever to cure them of hairballs and clear the kidneys, and they LOVE it. I will not feed my cats a fish-based wet food (especially tuna), as cats do not eat it naturally, and tuna has its own health issues attached, one of which is mercury. (I was grateful to learn this, actually, because the fish-based wet foods stink, too!) I would feed my cats a raw food diet if I could figure out a way to make it work with indoor cats and a full-time job, but as a second-best alternative I am feeding them the above-mentioned mixture, plus a bowl of water plus (for now) a little bit of Origen Cat & Kitten. I no longer trust the likes of Science Diet and Royal Canin for kidney crystals. Origen has the highest meat-based protein content that I have found, and I still don't give them much of it, just enough to satisfy their enjoyment of crunchy food, since they don't have bird bones to gnaw on. 

 

To sum up, after about a month on this regimen, my cats - who were barfing up hairballs constantly - have barfed no more than twice since this regimen started. This is a HUGE improvement, and far more successful than ANY hairball remedy or hairball teats I have tried. My male cat has been treated for crystals before, and when he started behaving oddly a couple of months ago I had the vet run tests and there was no sign of crystals (and he was given antibiotics doh3.gif) in case of a UTI. We never found out what the problem had been, but his behaviour has corrected, in addition to the complete absence of hairball issues.

 

Dry food diet is not healthy for cats, as they will not get anywhere near adequate hydration from the amount of water they will drink. I am grateful to have found TJ's wet food, as it seems to be very high quality and the price is so reasonable. My cats love it, and they are happy and hydrated on it. In the absence of a raw food diet, I feel pretty confident that I am doing the best that I can for them. I wish I had known this sooner!

smile.gif  Welcome to the Forum, and welcome to the folks here that have been trying to share the problems with serving dry food to cats.  

I'm sending you a private message with a website that you might like. 

post #55 of 78

6 weeks in to my 6 year old, otherwise very healthy and active, male being on Bench & Field dry "holistic" cat food ... and he as in the ER Vet with blocked urinary tract and struvite crystals!!!!  - with a urine pH of 8 (proper cat urine pH should be 6).

 

Prior to this he was on Science Diet Hairball formula, but thinking the grain products might be contributing to his mild skin condition/iching, we switched to the B&F. It almost killed him and he's still recovering. I will NEVER feed this to him again!!!
I brought the B&F ingredient label to his primary vet for review and they instantly determined the protein (meat) content too low, and the veg/fruit content too high... resulting in the pH imbalance. Crystals from in an alkaline (above 7) environment. A meat diet results in an acidic (below 7) urine, which is not conducive to forming crystals. Veg/Fruit diet results in an alkaline urine - perfect for crystals.

Hydration is also a major factor, and wet food is more like the cats natural diet of 85% moisture (mice, birds, etc.). If the cat is eating quality dry food and also consuming ample water, it would be ok. if not consuming ample water, dehydration would become a factor. But still, the pH environment is the major concern for struvite crystals.

 

Live and learn....... but i will NEVER feed him Bench & Field Holistic dry again!!! that is for sure!

~ den's mom

post #56 of 78

I've seen the Bench & Field dry food and treats. Occasionally I will buy the treats as a topper for raw food. The dry food I have never tried. 

 

Now, Trader Joe's CANNED cat food in Turkey and Giblets is what I started feeding my cat when I first got her. I didn't know how my budget would be at the time and was still figuring out how much I can spend on food. I now feed raw, but I still recommend the Turkey and Giblets wet food to anyone who needs to be on a budget. 

post #57 of 78

Hi...In answer to your question about why CD cat food can be called prescription, according to my vet, there is a medicine in the food that creates thirst in the cat.  Therefore, the cat drinks more water than he normally would.  I know this to be true with my male cat who has bad issues with crystals.  Since being on the CD diet, he has not had an incident in over two years.  Hill's is not the best food, and I hate feeding it to him, but to switch his food and take the chance of him getting crystals again is not an option.  kitty.gif

post #58 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyKisses View Post
 

Hi...In answer to your question about why CD cat food can be called prescription, according to my vet, there is a medicine in the food that creates thirst in the cat.  Therefore, the cat drinks more water than he normally would.  I know this to be true with my male cat who has bad issues with crystals.  Since being on the CD diet, he has not had an incident in over two years.  Hill's is not the best food, and I hate feeding it to him, but to switch his food and take the chance of him getting crystals again is not an option.  kitty.gif

Actually the "medicine" you are referring to that creates thirst in the cat is salt, plain old salt. The reason c/d and s/d are prescription is the added methionine which is an amino acid which acts as a urine acidifier. The urine acidifier bring urine pH down to levels where crystals do not form as easily. Feeding a diet high in meat also acts as a natural urine acidifier.

post #59 of 78

Most all commercial cat food has salt in it.  That is an nutrient that cats need.  If the additive you are referring to is plain old salt, then why does the CD cat food work for urinary problems when regular cat food does not? They both contain salt.  So the salt  analogy doesn't quite make sense.  I am sure that Hills does add something to the medicated food, because it works where regular food does not.  Of course, they are not going to tell the general public what that "medicine" is. 

post #60 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinyKisses View Post
 

Most all commercial cat food has salt in it.  That is an nutrient that cats need.  If the additive you are referring to is plain old salt, then why does the CD cat food work for urinary problems when regular cat food does not? They both contain salt.  So the salt  analogy doesn't quite make sense.  I am sure that Hills does add something to the medicated food, because it works where regular food does not.  Of course, they are not going to tell the general public what that "medicine" is.

I thought I had explained that methionine, not salt, is the "medicine" that makes c/d and s/d effective against the formation of struvite crystals.

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