TheCatSite.com › Forums › Feral Cats and Rescue › Caring for Strays and Ferals › Oh my gosh - is this common!?!?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Oh my gosh - is this common!?!? - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amandaofcols
I also understand the reality of the situation, I just get really frustrated when I think about it. I was mostly venting, again, sorry if I stepped on any toes. My emotions tend to run away with my fingers when it comes to this sort of thing...
Amanda....I understand completely...you didn't step on my toes at all. Here is what I would do....get in touch with No More Homeless Pets Atlanta and see if they can help you:

http://atlantapets.org/lifeline.zz?this=63

You can also contact local vets to see if they are aware of anyone who is doing TNR as individuals. Oftentimes there are people who are conducting TNR..but don't have an organization.

Remember...it just takes one person to change things for the better for feral cats.

Katie
post #32 of 51
Thanks so much. I will most definitely!! I do know we have an Allied Cats of Columbus, so I'm going to contact them to see what we can do. Thanks again for your help and also for listening to me vent!
post #33 of 51
Thread Starter 
Hi there!

I'm sure Katie (TNR1) would refer you to Alley Cat Allies.. you can see if there are any TNR groups in your area on their site. Sometimes if you do a google search w/ keywords like "TNR Feral Cats Columbus" you can come up w/ something. Actually, the way I was in touch w/ my group was joining the NH Animal Rights League and networking with them.

Let us know how it works out.

I do know what you mean.. your message was basically saying 'why can't we treat animals like we do humans'. People who torture and kill humans are punished severely.. yet when it comes to animal rights (I'm not referring to the spaying while pregnant) in general.. the animals really don't have many rights. It's sad but the best thing we can do is keep doing the dirty work and see the forest through the trees. I say that now but I know this rescue work is going to change my life forever. Like I mentioned (and others) - there are some HARSH, HARSH realities to this kind of rescue work- I think a lot more than meets the eyes. A lot of people just turn a cheek and pretend it's not real - I wish I could but I care too much, so if it means my heart being broken, then so be it because I know, in the end, that I will have saved thousands of lives. I know it will be rewarding but I'll definitely need a support system along the way!

It's really late so I don't know if I just made sense w/ what I was trying to say. What it comes down to is overpopulation should be taken a lot more seriously. There are a lot of threads on here about this.. so take a browse.. you'll see a lot of people wanting to fight to get tougher laws when it comes to spay/neuter, etc.

Ha, I'm going to bed now before I really just babble and say things that don't even make sense.

Have a good night.. you too Katie!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amandaofcols
BTW, if anyone has any information on how to get a similar program started here in Columbus, please share! We have become so lacadaisical (sp??) around here when it comes to animals!! It just rips my heart to shreds.
post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
Okay- I have the answer to it all!!!

Put to sleep the ones who commit animal cruelty... they're not needed/wanted on this earth anyway!

Okay, I'm way too tired!!! zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amandaofcols
To be quite honest, sometimes I think we should, but again that's just my opinion!
post #35 of 51
Thread Starter 
I know with the group I am with now.. they didn't want to be listed w/ ACA's ... ONLY because we are so swamped as it is. I convinced her we should because we can possibly get volunteers out of it as well. We are so overwhelmed w/ a 'To Be Trapped' list that we can't even fathom getting more calls about more colonies that need to be rescued.

So definitely check w/ your vets, shelters (stuff Katie suggested) - as well as the google search. There could very well be someone right down the street from you that just isn't advertising!

Good luck!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amandaofcols
BTW, thank you for the link. I just checked it out, and as I figured, there aren't any listed for Columbus. The only things we have here are Animal Control, PAWS, and the HUmane Society, but I feel there should be more, as there isn't a high level of "protection" for animals. Sorry I can't think of a better wording.
Also, I did not mean to step on any toes with my first comment on this subject. It's just that I get really emotional when I hear of things like this. People can help the situations they are in (for the most part) animals can't, some of them depend on us for there safety and survival.
post #36 of 51
Thread Starter 
I just cannot tear myself from the computer! Hehe.

I will definitely call this weeked!!

Have fun at lunch!

Thanks for all the posts on this thread- you've added a great deal!

Alright, I'm off to bed.. for real this time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
I'm meeting my mom for lunch but will be around tomorrow evening and Sunday.

Katie
post #37 of 51
I have rescued 16 cats 12 of those were females, the last one I rescued had 5 babies with her all females, when I got them home I took mommy first to the vet she was not even a year old with 5 babies and she was pregrant again, I had her spayed and once the 5 babie girls were old enough I had them all spayed as I did with the other 10 I rescued, spayed and neutered, tested, shots, wormed and treated for fleas, I have 6 of the ones I rescued in my home and I Love them dearly, it took me a year to get all of those 16 and it is alot of hard work but more heartache when you don't get them, they came from a busy shopping center parking lot all of them, I dare to think how many would be there now had I not got what I did, it is a major crises for sure. The county I live in puts thousands to sleep every year, People have still not gotten the spay and neuter message and it's just heart brakeing, and it's not just 1 shopping center there everywhere anymore, I have alway's said I don't beleive that Cats get the same respect as dogs, as I have yet to see a litter of puppies wondering around in a busy shopping center parking lot, I don't think you would, at least the Humane society or pound would go and get them.
post #38 of 51
Thread Starter 
I totally understand what you mean. I do have to say w/ dogs.. they don't 'multiply' like cats do.

Over a seven year period, a cat and her kittens can theoretically have 420,000 cats... a dog and her pups can theoretically have 64,000 (I believe what the number I read.. correct me if I'm wrong) dogs. So, that's one major reason.. cats totally outnumber dogs in the first place. But yes, a dog roaming the streets would absolutely be rescued before a cat roaming the streets.

**OH, and let me add. In NH anyway, if someone hits a dog - it's the law that they have to stop and get out. Hmm... not that way with cats!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by halfpint
I have rescued 16 cats 12 of those were females, the last one I rescued had 5 babies with her all females, when I got them home I took mommy first to the vet she was not even a year old with 5 babies and she was pregrant again, I had her spayed and once the 5 babie girls were old enough I had them all spayed as I did with the other 10 I rescued, spayed and neutered, tested, shots, wormed and treated for fleas, I have 6 of the ones I rescued in my home and I Love them dearly, it took me a year to get all of those 16 and it is alot of hard work but more heartache when you don't get them, they came from a busy shopping center parking lot all of them, I dare to think how many would be there now had I not got what I did, it is a major crises for sure. The county I live in puts thousands to sleep every year, People have still not gotten the spay and neuter message and it's just heart brakeing, and it's not just 1 shopping center there everywhere anymore, I have alway's said I don't beleive that Cats get the same respect as dogs, as I have yet to see a litter of puppies wondering around in a busy shopping center parking lot, I don't think you would, at least the Humane society or pound would go and get them.
post #39 of 51
This practice is common as well it should be. Would you prefer a mama cat have kittens who die a slow death of starvation and cruelty on the street, eaten alive by some larger mammal, picked up someone who uses them as snake food, hit by a car and left to die, freeezes to death as it gets colder, attacked by people who hate cats (and there are too many ailophobes out there!) or something worse. Most feral cats brought to pounds - kittens included - are immediately euthenized. If the kittens are never born, they never suffer. Sadly, there are something like 1 person for every 10 cats in North America and of course not every family wants a cat. That is the sad reality and spaying mama while she is pregnant is a Godsend to her and the yet developed fetuses.
post #40 of 51
Any pregnant stray that shows up here, is trapped, and taken to the vet to be spayed. It is a sad reality but there are no homes for feral and stray kittens because people usually want a nice, wonderful lap kitty to sit on them while they watch television. Having a spitting hissing clawing kitten puts a lot of people off. The females are spayed, the males neutered and they are re-released on our land. My one feral cat turns 11 years old soon and he has only been inside 3 times in his lifetime. He hates confinement and will fight you tooth and nail if you try. He is a total love outside though.
post #41 of 51
Thread Starter 
Still up... barely..

Just to clear it up .. I am not saying I would "prefer" any of those things. This post was to understand why something so tragic like aborting kittens is happening (or even common, is how it started).

We all know the horrible things that can happen to cats, it's why all my 8 are strictly indoors and why I'm such an advocate for indoors! No one 'prefers' for those things to happen... we (me anyway) needed to make sense of it because like we all keep saying - it's a very tragic reality and difficult to swallow at first, until you understand the logic behind it.

I consider myself pretty knowledgeable w/ cats - but rescue, I don't know much at all... well, at least since I've started doing rescue work- I now know that I pretty much knew nothing! (Can you tell I'm tired)

Heading to bed.. apologize if I didn't make sense but wanted to clarify that not many on this board would 'prefer' those horrible things to happen to anyone or anything, never mind a cat.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberKitten
This practice is common as well it should be. Would you prefer a mama cat have kittens who die a slow death of starvation and cruelty on the street, eaten alive by some larger mammal, picked up someone who uses them as snake food, hit by a car and left to die, freeezes to death as it gets colder, attacked by people who hate cats (and there are too many ailophobes out there!) or something worse. Most feral cats brought to pounds - kittens included - are immediately euthenized. If the kittens are never born, they never suffer. Sadly, there are something like 1 person for every 10 cats in North America and of course not every family wants a cat. That is the sad reality and spaying mama while she is pregnant is a Godsend to her and the yet developed fetuses.
post #42 of 51
Thread Starter 
This is a very honest question- something I've been wondering.

What are the chances of kittens 'acting' feral if taken from their mom at 8 wks old and adopted out?

I know they say the chances are much greater if you can get kittens by 10-12 wks old.

If a pregnant cat is about to deliver any minute- will the spay still be performed? Is there any cut off whatsoever?? I may have already asked this/or may have already been answered, but I just can not remember right now.

I'm off to bed.. hehe, I keep saying that - I said that 2 hours ago and it's 3 now..

Goodnight! Thanks for the post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
Any pregnant stray that shows up here, is trapped, and taken to the vet to be spayed. It is a sad reality but there are no homes for feral and stray kittens because people usually want a nice, wonderful lap kitty to sit on them while they watch television. Having a spitting hissing clawing kitten puts a lot of people off. The females are spayed, the males neutered and they are re-released on our land. My one feral cat turns 11 years old soon and he has only been inside 3 times in his lifetime. He hates confinement and will fight you tooth and nail if you try. He is a total love outside though.
post #43 of 51
it depends on the vet doing the spay, but most will abort the kittens. Do they like it, no, but they understand it is a necessary thing to do. The lesser of two evils.

When you work with feral cats they don't all want to be indoors. Some will never adapt no matter what. You will find your windows ripped open, your door off the hinge, wallpaper shredded, holes chewed in walls. Some cats won't stay indoors.

The kittens can be socialized at any age. It just takes time- and most people do not want to invest the time it takes to reach them. I have four upstairs right now, I have had just under two weeks- One is coming around, I hope to adopt her out tomorrow morning- the other three are still not trusting and will take work, and patience and love. They are 7 months old, found in an old abandoned campground.
post #44 of 51
This was posted recently on Best Friends Forum and I thought it was worth sharing:

Question from Merry:
What do you think about spaying pregnant cats, especially those who are in the latter stages of their pregnancy?


Response from Celeste Crimi:
Eek--I'm scared to answer this one! I wish I could just hide behind Faith Maloney of Best Friends' excellent response when she was a forum guest during the Ethical Dilemmas week (see her post at http://www.bestfriends.com/archives/...dilemmas.html).

But, it's an important topic so I'll chime in, even though I can only speak to my own feelings and what I have witnessed both in the animal welfare and veterinary arenas.

My introduction to animal rescue was short-term fostering of young, attractive, brightly colored animals, for a foster network which pulled animals from a county shelter. Another volunteer pulled the animals, so all I ever saw was an adorable kitten/cat delivered to my house. At an adoption outreach event, one of my fellow volunteers mentioned that she had used to work for a feral cat Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) organization, but she couldn't take it that they spayed pregnant females. Since the thought of the kittens not being born saddened me, even though they didn't know pain or suffering during the procedure, her perspective made sense to me.

Then I moved and started volunteering at an actual shelter on adoption days, and fostering one adult, special needs, often plain-looking cat at a time. And at adoption events I started realizing that during kitten season it was much more difficult to get people to even look at my wonderful, smart, loving, unique foster cat with a history of love and loss. Eighty percent of the adoptions at this particular shelter were kittens. Females were not spayed if they were pregnant, so there were always lots and lots of kittens to choose from.

I got to the point where every time I saw a cute, little kitten face, I'd visualize the sad eyes of a homeless adult cat who would now be put to sleep so that the baby could get the available home, instead. There are a finite number of stellar adopters out there. No amount of marketing is going to change that, for now. Even for the kittens there were too many to go around--at the end of the summer there'd be cages full of gangly, adolescent 'leftover' kittens--all black and brown. The ones who hadn't gotten picked. Sure, we could have launched a 'Black is Beautiful' campaign--but then the orange, calico and Siamese colorings would be left! My opinion began to turn around a bit. I thought maybe I should look into this further before forming an opinion.

Below is what I learned in the subsequent years, and the conclusions I reached as a result.

We often hear of cats having to bear young because a vet told the clients she was 'too far along to spay.'

I also know and volunteer with many surgeons who will spay at any stage of pregnancy. Any stage includes up to delivery date.

It seems that spaying pregnant females elicits the same response as does prepubescent spay/neuter from certain veterinarians, who state arbitrary dates about whom they'll consider surgical candidates. I've heard 2 months, 3 months, 4 months, 5 months, 6 months, 7 months and even 8 months as the minimum, safe age for spaying. I've also heard, "after she's gone through her first estrus/heat"--yes, from licensed veterinarians!

Similarly, it would seem that some veterinarians are making up their own rules about who they'll feel comfortable spaying. I've heard if she's detectably pregnant, if she's through her first term (cats are pregnant for 8-9 weeks, which is divided into 2 terms, and they generally start showing at the beginning of the 2nd term, at 4-5 weeks), if she's a week or two away from delivery, if she's 'about to pop,' etc.

However, many vets have extensive experience relieving females, no matter how far along they are, of the burden of bearing and nursing litters whom they're almost always destined to be separated from, usually never to see their babies again. Far from appearing lost or grieving, most would-have-been mothers bear an air of palpable relief upon awakening from spay surgery. At least it's looked that way to me.

Furthermore, when we deal with cats who come from a long line of mal-nourished, over-taxed parents and grandparents, it becomes almost commonplace to have mother/kittens not make it after the birth. I can't tell you how many times I've heard reports from recipients such as, "She had 5 kittens, but 2 of them died..." or, "We don't know what happened to the mama, we found her dead one morning about 2 weeks after the kittens were born..." My anecdotal observation is the possibility for problems goes up the more litters a particular cat has.

Make no mistake; I'm not intimating that a late-term spay is just as easy as for an early-term or non-pregnant female. She loses more fluid and a greater portion of her total body mass (administering subcutaneous fluids post-op can offset this phenomenon). Her more venous uterus is more likely to have a vein that continues to leak a bit, causing post-op bruising or bleeding. The incision may be about an inch longer than usual. She may be under general anesthesia slightly longer, especially with a surgeon unused to the procedure. She may require more anesthetic, due to hormonal and metabolic changes in a pregnant female, and she'll typically wake up from anesthesia more quickly.

The alternative, of course, is that the mother bears the young, enduring probable growth stunting as she gives all her nutrients to nurse her young--it's expected for a lactating feline to lose 25% of her body weight while her kittens outgrow her in combined weight. Mastitis (infected teats) is always a possibility, along with the usual birthing complications, such as partial births, retained placentas, post-partum infection, etc. Not to mention the overpopulation statistics and realities we're all too familiar with. Bottom line: if more babies are born, an equal number of adult shelter animals will be put down as the newborns elbow out the 'second hand' adoptables in competition for available homes. That's a pretty high 'complication rate,' much higher than for late-term spays!

Spaying females at any stage of pregnancy is often considered a kindness to the mother, since birth and lactation are also high-risk undertakings. After much consideration, I have taken a Mothers First stance on this issue. I look forward to the day when there will be homes a-plenty and puppies and kittens a treasured rarity, which ties into POPPA's motto: "People working together can make pets precious again!"
post #45 of 51
I'm going to add my 2c here. I have been a foster carer for almost 200 kittens - orphaned, abandoned, feral and even premature kittens. I love what I do but I also realise that there are many, many more kittens out there who aren't so lucky. I would much rather that there was not even a need for people who do what I do. I am all for spaying a pregnant female cat, no matter how old the kittens are. It's not as if there's a shortage of kittens - far from it. Some of the kittens have come to me to be socialized, as they were born of a feral mumcat. It is very, very hard to find a home for a semi or formerly feral kitten when there are thousands of cute, cheap kittens in the petshops. Others were rejected by their mumcats - cats who were too young, too weak or too ill to be able to care for their kittens or are from cases where mumcat has died either while giving birth or nursing the kittens. Still others were taken from their mumcat only days after birth and left in a cardboard box somewhere. Pregnancy and birth can actually be fatal for some cats, especially if they're stray or feral. I have seen the result of cat pregnancies being completed and it sometimes results in sick, debilitated, premature or deformed kittens. It can be heartbreaking at times.
post #46 of 51
Thread Starter 
Thank you!

Here's my question.. and it may be stupid but..

If I am taking these cats in as fosters.. how do I socialize them when I basically have to keep them in the cage because I can't have them interacting w/ my cats. That's the one biggest concern I have- taking cats in that aren't healthy and possibly getting my cats sick.

Any suggestions?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
it depends on the vet doing the spay, but most will abort the kittens. Do they like it, no, but they understand it is a necessary thing to do. The lesser of two evils.

When you work with feral cats they don't all want to be indoors. Some will never adapt no matter what. You will find your windows ripped open, your door off the hinge, wallpaper shredded, holes chewed in walls. Some cats won't stay indoors.

The kittens can be socialized at any age. It just takes time- and most people do not want to invest the time it takes to reach them. I have four upstairs right now, I have had just under two weeks- One is coming around, I hope to adopt her out tomorrow morning- the other three are still not trusting and will take work, and patience and love. They are 7 months old, found in an old abandoned campground.
post #47 of 51
Thread Starter 
Thank you for sharing that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
This was posted recently on Best Friends Forum and I thought it was worth sharing:

Question from Merry:
What do you think about spaying pregnant cats, especially those who are in the latter stages of their pregnancy?


Response from Celeste Crimi:
Eek--I'm scared to answer this one! I wish I could just hide behind Faith Maloney of Best Friends' excellent response when she was a forum guest during the Ethical Dilemmas week (see her post at http://www.bestfriends.com/archives/...dilemmas.html).

But, it's an important topic so I'll chime in, even though I can only speak to my own feelings and what I have witnessed both in the animal welfare and veterinary arenas.

My introduction to animal rescue was short-term fostering of young, attractive, brightly colored animals, for a foster network which pulled animals from a county shelter. Another volunteer pulled the animals, so all I ever saw was an adorable kitten/cat delivered to my house. At an adoption outreach event, one of my fellow volunteers mentioned that she had used to work for a feral cat Trap, Neuter, Return (TNR) organization, but she couldn't take it that they spayed pregnant females. Since the thought of the kittens not being born saddened me, even though they didn't know pain or suffering during the procedure, her perspective made sense to me.

Then I moved and started volunteering at an actual shelter on adoption days, and fostering one adult, special needs, often plain-looking cat at a time. And at adoption events I started realizing that during kitten season it was much more difficult to get people to even look at my wonderful, smart, loving, unique foster cat with a history of love and loss. Eighty percent of the adoptions at this particular shelter were kittens. Females were not spayed if they were pregnant, so there were always lots and lots of kittens to choose from.

I got to the point where every time I saw a cute, little kitten face, I'd visualize the sad eyes of a homeless adult cat who would now be put to sleep so that the baby could get the available home, instead. There are a finite number of stellar adopters out there. No amount of marketing is going to change that, for now. Even for the kittens there were too many to go around--at the end of the summer there'd be cages full of gangly, adolescent 'leftover' kittens--all black and brown. The ones who hadn't gotten picked. Sure, we could have launched a 'Black is Beautiful' campaign--but then the orange, calico and Siamese colorings would be left! My opinion began to turn around a bit. I thought maybe I should look into this further before forming an opinion.

Below is what I learned in the subsequent years, and the conclusions I reached as a result.

We often hear of cats having to bear young because a vet told the clients she was 'too far along to spay.'

I also know and volunteer with many surgeons who will spay at any stage of pregnancy. Any stage includes up to delivery date.

It seems that spaying pregnant females elicits the same response as does prepubescent spay/neuter from certain veterinarians, who state arbitrary dates about whom they'll consider surgical candidates. I've heard 2 months, 3 months, 4 months, 5 months, 6 months, 7 months and even 8 months as the minimum, safe age for spaying. I've also heard, "after she's gone through her first estrus/heat"--yes, from licensed veterinarians!

Similarly, it would seem that some veterinarians are making up their own rules about who they'll feel comfortable spaying. I've heard if she's detectably pregnant, if she's through her first term (cats are pregnant for 8-9 weeks, which is divided into 2 terms, and they generally start showing at the beginning of the 2nd term, at 4-5 weeks), if she's a week or two away from delivery, if she's 'about to pop,' etc.

However, many vets have extensive experience relieving females, no matter how far along they are, of the burden of bearing and nursing litters whom they're almost always destined to be separated from, usually never to see their babies again. Far from appearing lost or grieving, most would-have-been mothers bear an air of palpable relief upon awakening from spay surgery. At least it's looked that way to me.

Furthermore, when we deal with cats who come from a long line of mal-nourished, over-taxed parents and grandparents, it becomes almost commonplace to have mother/kittens not make it after the birth. I can't tell you how many times I've heard reports from recipients such as, "She had 5 kittens, but 2 of them died..." or, "We don't know what happened to the mama, we found her dead one morning about 2 weeks after the kittens were born..." My anecdotal observation is the possibility for problems goes up the more litters a particular cat has.

Make no mistake; I'm not intimating that a late-term spay is just as easy as for an early-term or non-pregnant female. She loses more fluid and a greater portion of her total body mass (administering subcutaneous fluids post-op can offset this phenomenon). Her more venous uterus is more likely to have a vein that continues to leak a bit, causing post-op bruising or bleeding. The incision may be about an inch longer than usual. She may be under general anesthesia slightly longer, especially with a surgeon unused to the procedure. She may require more anesthetic, due to hormonal and metabolic changes in a pregnant female, and she'll typically wake up from anesthesia more quickly.

The alternative, of course, is that the mother bears the young, enduring probable growth stunting as she gives all her nutrients to nurse her young--it's expected for a lactating feline to lose 25% of her body weight while her kittens outgrow her in combined weight. Mastitis (infected teats) is always a possibility, along with the usual birthing complications, such as partial births, retained placentas, post-partum infection, etc. Not to mention the overpopulation statistics and realities we're all too familiar with. Bottom line: if more babies are born, an equal number of adult shelter animals will be put down as the newborns elbow out the 'second hand' adoptables in competition for available homes. That's a pretty high 'complication rate,' much higher than for late-term spays!

Spaying females at any stage of pregnancy is often considered a kindness to the mother, since birth and lactation are also high-risk undertakings. After much consideration, I have taken a Mothers First stance on this issue. I look forward to the day when there will be homes a-plenty and puppies and kittens a treasured rarity, which ties into POPPA's motto: "People working together can make pets precious again!"
post #48 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by xomycatsxo
Thank you!

Here's my question.. and it may be stupid but..

If I am taking these cats in as fosters.. how do I socialize them when I basically have to keep them in the cage because I can't have them interacting w/ my cats. That's the one biggest concern I have- taking cats in that aren't healthy and possibly getting my cats sick.

Any suggestions?
There are no stupid questions here, remember that!

If you were to foster cats, you would most likely need a whole room that they can call their own. You're right to be concerned about illness. The best way to deal with this is to wash your hands and forearms throrughly after interacting with the fosters and many carers keep a separate set of clothes, so they are not transferring bugs to or from their own cats on the clothes.
post #49 of 51
Thread Starter 
Thank you!

What do I do if I don't have a sep. room for them?

Hmm.. I've been thinking of putting my dining room table in my living room (I started a thread that had pics of a new floor I put in- so you can get an idea of how huge the LR is) and closing the dining room off and making a bedroom or something out of it. We had ideas for that room, but maybe, for now - we could put a door on the two entries and put the cats in there? Where I would be putting the cages is right near the wood stove as well.. so that may get a little warm.

However, if I don't have a room anytime soon - what would you suggest? I was thinking of gathering all of my cats in my bedroom upstairs and bringing the fosters out to be socialized?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kumbulu
There are no stupid questions here, remember that!

If you were to foster cats, you would most likely need a whole room that they can call their own. You're right to be concerned about illness. The best way to deal with this is to wash your hands and forearms throrughly after interacting with the fosters and many carers keep a separate set of clothes, so they are not transferring bugs to or from their own cats on the clothes.
post #50 of 51
You could perhaps build or buy a large cage but you would need to find a way to block access to the cage by your cats as even just sniffing each other is enough to transfer bugs.
post #51 of 51
Thread Starter 
Hmm.. okay. Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kumbulu
You could perhaps build or buy a large cage but you would need to find a way to block access to the cage by your cats as even just sniffing each other is enough to transfer bugs.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Caring for Strays and Ferals
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Feral Cats and Rescue › Caring for Strays and Ferals › Oh my gosh - is this common!?!?