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PETA at it again regarding Feral Cats

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
This is posted in the LaCrosse Tribune:

Feral cats

By Lindsay Pollard-Post Norfolk, Va.

Thank you for your article "Feral cats are back: Group to give population control seminar," (Aug. 25). Let's hope that, in addition to legal and financial issues, La Crosse County also will consider the hardships feral cats face in deciding whether to allow trap-neuter-return programs.

Unless they are located in a temperate climate in an area isolated from roads, people and other animals and are provided with food, water and veterinary care, feral cats struggle to survive. Feral cats don't die of old age. Many suffer terribly from contagious diseases like rhinotrachitis, feline AIDS and rabies. Others sustain puncture wounds, broken bones, brain damage, or lose eyes or limbs after being attacked by other animals, abused by cruel people, or hit by cars.

Given these gruesome fates, and until the cat overpopulation is stemmed through spaying and neutering, euthanasia is a humane option for feral cats. PETA offers brochures on helping feral cats and how to introduce a local spay/neuter ordinance. Readers can get our free literature from Helping Animals.com.

Lindsay Pollard-Post is a staff writer for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

http://www.lacrossetribune.com/artic.../letters29.txt

Again....I do not understanding how they can justify killing of cats as humane....especially given the fact that these cats are surviving against all odds against them.

PETAs full stance on feral cats:

http://www.peta.org/mc/factsheet_display.asp?ID=38

Notice again...they recommend euthanasia over allowing them to live outdoors once they have been spayed/neutered:

Because of the huge number of feral cats and the severe shortage of good homes, the difficulty of socialization, and the dangers lurking where most feral cats live, it may be necessary and the most compassionate choice to euthanize feral cats. You can ask your veterinarian to do this or, if your local shelter uses an injection of sodium pentobarbital, take the cats there. Please do not allow the prospect of euthanasia to deter you from trapping cats. If you leave them where they are, they will almost certainly die a painful death. A painless injection is far kinder than any fate that feral cats will meet if left to survive on their own.
post #2 of 25
ETHICAL treatment of animals??
It always gets me when they say things that basically amount to "Well, this animal is going to DIE OUT THERE, so it's better if someone who claims to love and respect animals kills it first!"
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
ETHICAL treatment of animals??
It always gets me when they say things that basically amount to "Well, this animal is going to DIE OUT THERE, so it's better if someone who claims to love and respect animals kills it first!"
This is Nathan Winograd's take on it:

And the mother of all cat myths, that feral cats live short, miserable lives. Many animals (raccoons, foxes, deer, mice) face hardships and yet we would NEVER advocate they be killed for their own good. In addition, this is often simply not the case.
post #4 of 25
At the very least, they could try to find them homes before they take away their lives.
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purr
At the very least, they could try to find them homes before they take away their lives.
Problem is....many domesticated cats are euthanized in shelters because there aren't enough homes....trying to place feral cats that aren't adoptable for the most part...isn't going to be successful. That is why there is TNR.

Katie
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
Unless they are located in a temperate climate in an area isolated from roads, people and other animals and are provided with food, water and veterinary care, feral cats struggle to survive. Feral cats don't die of old age. Many suffer terribly from contagious diseases like rhinotrachitis, feline AIDS and rabies. Others sustain puncture wounds, broken bones, brain damage, or lose eyes or limbs after being attacked by other animals, abused by cruel people, or hit by cars.
What interesting to me is that there are parts of the world where the people suffer these problems as well, but I'd like to see how euthenasia would work as a suggestion for that problem.

What I think works even better as an arguement however, is that euthanasia doesn't actually reduce the population. Every year roughly the same number of animals were being put to sleep in the shelter, so obviously it wasn't actually solving anything.

Correct me if I am wrong, but there are now animal shelters that are refusing to take in ferals? I don't think it's widespread, but I read about it some in the Maddie's newsletters. I think that's great.
post #7 of 25
how....not..cool but typical Peta
post #8 of 25
Flipping heck! Peta really are cracked aren't they?

Fancy saying they're better off dead, I bet the cats wouldn't agree. You might as well say that any living thing would be better off dead than having to face the realities of life, people get hit by cars all the time, better kill them before it happens. People get sick too, are Peta advocating euthanasia of all people entering A&E?

And what on earth do they mean when they say "until the cat population is stemmed"? Perhaps we see their real agenda here - the elimination of pet cats as a species. Personally I don't think they have a chance of achieving this, we all love our cats too much.

Sue
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
Problem is....many domesticated cats are euthanized in shelters because there aren't enough homes....trying to place feral cats that aren't adoptable for the most part...isn't going to be successful. That is why there is TNR.

Katie
TNR?
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purr
TNR?
TNR = Trap/Neuter/Release


I will definitely be doing my best to convince my mother to adopt a small feral colony for working barn cats.
She loves cats, but can no longer have them in the house.
I think this would be a great solution for her as well as the cats.

I think if these PETA idiots actually bothered to try, they would find many rural homes that would welcome feral colonies as working cats.
Afterall, PETA has the money, and the manpower, whereas most other, better Animal welfare orgs do not.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purr
TNR?
Trap-Neuter-Return/Release

It stabilizes the population, reduces or (best case) eliminates the reproduction cycle of the colony. The cats are healthier, and the population won't continue to increase exponentially.
post #12 of 25
Some groups that say they are all about animal rights are anything but

Just north of here there are feral dogs running all over the place. When we fly into some of the reserves you have to be careful not to hit them. I was told that once a year they have a "dog day". On that day of the year, if they see a dog outside they shoot it!, Hello!!! what ever happened to spaying and neuteriing as a long term solution, also if they gathered them up they could adopt them out down here.

but no the "humane society" just shoots them
post #13 of 25
Our last cat, Straycat, was from a feral colony where he lived for eight years; we coaxed him in when the colony was dissolved due to construction, had him neutered and vetted, and he lived another six years. The other members were trapped, neutered, housed, and many were eventually socialized and adopted. Jamie is the product of a feral colony; his pregnant mother was trapped at a feeding station and placed in a foster home. TNR does work, so I find PETA's claim that euthanasia is "better" simply outrageous.
post #14 of 25
I cant believe that people are still thinking in the rattlesnake roundup mantality... I live in a unique area in the city but a fairly wooded area ... If i could fine the ferals I would trap and fix and release not kill them
post #15 of 25
Hypocrites. First they say they hope for a day when people don't own animals, that animals will all be free, now they're about killing cats who are free. Hah.
post #16 of 25
Well.... I would have to agree with PETA a tiny bit. It depends on the cat of course. I would euth only the very very sick or very very very injuried cats. If you can find them. If someone brings a feral in as a stray, then you might have problems. depending on the age of the cat, you may never get that cat to trust you. Unless you have a huge cat problem I'd leave them alone. Spay and neuter of course, but don't kill them for the sake of killing them.
post #17 of 25
I wouldnt have my Zoey if they got there way.... She was found as a pregnent feral./.. She is very cute sweet and ultra intellegent... May I euthanize all the wild humans>>>???
post #18 of 25
PETA, what a bunch of MORONS!!!!
post #19 of 25
Yeah John, we agree on that!
post #20 of 25
I have 3 ferals who I rarely see. They are wild animals. I did lose one this year, and she had a painful end, probably after a fight with a raccoon. So does it help lessen her pain any to kill her best friend Tommy? Or the brothers I have, who live their lives free of human interaction, except a bowl of kibble once a day. Do they deserve death just because someone didn't tame them as kittens?

Why not kill all the wild animals? PETA is a horrible organization. I wish more people knew.

If a feral cat has no place to return to, no place to be released after neutering, euthanasia may be an option. But done to all is madness. And we need to get to the place where no cat is ever euthanized, unless for severe illness or injury.
post #21 of 25
I have never agreed with peta until now. Not that I want cats to die, but I think that would be the most humane thing for the ones that can't be rescued or rehabilitated or cared for.
post #22 of 25
It seems PETA have gone from a "caring for the animals" association to now "playing God" and deciding what is best for the world.

God help us all!
post #23 of 25
Quote:
PETA is a horrible organization. I wish more people knew
I know it and would NEVER agree with ANYTHING that PETA does. They are a horrible orginization.
post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by annabelle33
I have never agreed with peta until now. Not that I want cats to die, but I think that would be the most humane thing for the ones that can't be rescued or rehabilitated or cared for.
Annabelle....feral cats are not cats that came from homes...these are cats that live outdoors and do not often do well in an indoor home. Who are we to say whether they should live or die because they have a different existance than their indoor companions. To me, that is like saying that we should kill all squirrels or all racoon.

Katie
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
Annabelle....feral cats are not cats that came from homes...these are cats that live outdoors and do not often do well in an indoor home. Who are we to say whether they should live or die because they have a different existance than their indoor companions. To me, that is like saying that we should kill all squirrels or all racoon.
Katie

I'd liken it more to the Chincoteague ponies or the mustangs.
Formerly domestic feral animals living wild.
Only difference is, the horses are treated better, they have the government on their side.
They are rounded up yearly, vetted, some auctioned off, and some stallions gelded to keep the populations stable, really no different than what TNR programs are doing for cats.


Should we just start rounding up the horses and destroy them as well?
I don't think one has any more rights to live as the other.
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