or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New Babies

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
My cat had kittens. She is a himalayan and the dad is a himalayan/persian.

I can't tell what kinda of cat they would be consider. Mom is a seal point and dad is a flame point. They seem to have a silver coat with dark brown almost black points. Does anyone know what they would be called????

Please help! E-mail me at tanya_dent@hotmail.com

post #2 of 21
Not sure of the coat color without pictures, but if you have those colors as points, you'd have seal point (m), seal tortie pt (f). How old are the kittens?
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
I do have pictures, but i don't know how to post them

I have one boy and one girl. They are 4.5 weeks old right now.
post #4 of 21
Bet they are adorable, by any name. I envy you!

post #5 of 21
Tayna, with pointed cats you have a whiter coat-especially with young kits. The seal/sealtortie points will usually end up with a little darker coats- maybe that's the color difference in you saying "silver".

You might have to wait on the female getting the red color in - but with those parents you HAVE to have a tortie as mom and dad will give her the color and they are both carrying a different color.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Seems that the girl does have a ting of red in her , but definately not much. They literally have like a dark skin and their fur is silver. Really silver!!!! But put up against mom (seal point) they don't look like her except for the points).

Do you know how I post pictures up on here so you could see them?

post #7 of 21
Not really - I'm trying to post pics too. Anyway I have strange kittens too and can't explain the color changes. I had blue tabby/white kittens when born; they developed points up till 6-8 weeks (seal) and now the kittens are black/white with faint points.

Blue just cannot change to black...or so I thought - weird color genetics going on now.
post #8 of 21
PM on the way - hopefully it will help you to post piccies. Feel free to ask if the instructions aren't clear
post #9 of 21
YA!!!! You got the picture up there . Drat - I knew there was something I forgot - hold on, PM on the way about how to resize.

Oh - the most important thing - the kittens are adorable
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
This is a picture of Mommy (Tessa Jane)

post #11 of 21
Awww she is such a beautiful kitty and the photo is a better size too. You're really getting the hang of it now
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 

Pictures of Babies - Anyone with any ideas on what type they are????
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 

a smaller pic...but you get the drift...they are like silver
post #14 of 21
Great job on the resizing Don't know about the type of kitten though - although they do look like they're probably heart-stealers
post #15 of 21
I've seen himi kittens like that before. Usually the parents are darker coated in the shading. Were they born white tho?

The kitten coat may shed out to a lighter color (hopefully). I don't call it siilver.
post #16 of 21
aww they look like little gremlins! ahah very very cute though!
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Yes...they were born like an off white (more like a dirty white). They have just kept getting darker.
post #18 of 21
Tanya I have no idea - my kittens are weirder then yours. I have no clue as to what is going on genetically now...this defies explanation so far. I have a breeder friend who is good with genetics - she's working on it.
post #19 of 21
Wow, I've never seen Persians like that before! Weird..Hope somebody has some answers for you
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

More piccies of the babes
post #21 of 21
Originally Posted by tanyadent

a smaller pic...but you get the drift...they are like silver
These are young seal points with a lot of shading. Color should drop out around 10-14 weeks.

From my experience with Siamese, those kittens which have the most body coloring when the age of your kittens wind up with the clearest coats and best contrast of points to body color.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Showing and Ethical Breeding