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Cats With Thumbs?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
This photo and query appreared on the Coast to Coast A.M. site today.

Have you heard of a cat with thumbs?

I'm not a breeder but wanted to ask if any of you have seen cats with opposing toes that appear to be thumb-like?

Thanks.
post #2 of 24
Yes, they are called "polydactyl".
post #3 of 24
Nothing more then a polydactyl cat - extra toes. Not that unusual at all. The danger is that people need to make sure those extra nails get cut!
post #4 of 24
Yes, we have a male Pixie-Bob that has these *thumbs* on his front feet and extra toes on his back feet also. as GoldenKitty45 said it is VERY important to trim these extra nails or they will cause serious trouble. His front feet look just like mittens.
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNCatFancier
This photo and query appreared on the Coast to Coast A.M. site today.

Have you heard of a cat with thumbs?

I'm not a breeder but wanted to ask if any of you have seen cats with opposing toes that appear to be thumb-like?

Thanks.
I have one like that!!! She has 6 toes on all her feet!
post #6 of 24
Yep, Chuckie does!!
Here's a pic of one of his feet

post #7 of 24
this made me think of them having actual opposing thumbs. somehow, that frightened me.
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by stormy
Yep, Chuckie does!!
Here's a pic of one of his feet

Here is a picture of one of Mandarin's back feet!!
post #9 of 24
My parents have one now and we had one when I was growing up. One sort of learned to use her 'thumb' to grab things like pens away from you. She was the best!
post #10 of 24
I've got a polydactyl kitty with "mitten paws."

-Qit
post #11 of 24
Polys are SO cute - they do look like mittens awwwww.....
post #12 of 24
I've definitely heard of polydactyl cats who become quite adept at using their extra toes.

I have to admit that this kind of scares me because I am certain that the only thing that has prevented my cats from taking over the world is their lack of opposable thumbs. As long as I am the only one who can operate the can opener, my place in the household should be secure. But if any of them should develop that capability, I'd be in a huge heap of trouble!
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by semiferal
I've definitely heard of polydactyl cats who become quite adept at using their extra toes.

I have to admit that this kind of scares me because I am certain that the only thing that has prevented my cats from taking over the world is their lack of opposable thumbs.
Aw, Circe'd make a sufficiently benevolent Supreme Dictatrix...and she's spayed, so she'd have to go out and find a heir...

Ehh, Roko wouldn't let Circe be the Supreme Dictatrix anyway, poly or no.

-Qit
post #14 of 24
Just remember they aren't a breed, it's a deformity and I believe no cats should be allowed to be bred that have this fault.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Just remember they aren't a breed, it's a deformity and I believe no cats should be allowed to be bred that have this fault.
I'm curious: Do you also think that Manx cats (spina bifida, IIRC) have a "fault" and should not be allowed to reproduce? Or does the fact that they're an established breed make such a difference?

-Qit
post #16 of 24
I don't think they should be bred either.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
I don't think they should be bred either.
Then at least you're consistent. Most people who malign polys have no problem with selective breeding for rumpies, blue-eyed whites, peke-faces, et cetera.

-Qit
post #18 of 24
post #19 of 24
My snowshoe uses his thumbs all the time. He use the fifth toe on both of his formt feet to grab my finger and toys. His sixth toe on the one foot doesn't get any use though. It just kinda sits there. I can post a pic of his feet later on when I get back to my home pc.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Just remember they aren't a breed, it's a deformity and I believe no cats should be allowed to be bred that have this fault.
What about persians? How did they get the flat face? some would consider that a deformity as well. Am I wrong or does that sometimes cause breathing problems like it does for pugs? I don't know much about persians but I am curious.
post #21 of 24
While we are getting a bit off topic here, I think there is much to be learned from this discussion. However, I do want to remind everyone to post with respect and maturity. While opinions and ideas may differ, one thing always remains constant - What might be right for YOU isn't always right for SOMEONE ELSE.

I have reopened this thread now.

~gf~
post #22 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Just remember they aren't a breed, it's a deformity and I believe no cats should be allowed to be bred that have this fault.
Sam, just for the record, polydactylism is a spontaneous mutation, not a defect. Granted, there exists the possibility polydactyl cats do not meet show standards in certain registries, but it is not now, nor has it ever been a "defect".

In order to understand the difference, one must understand the terminology. In very, very simple terms, a defect is normally not good, mutations can be either good or bad depending (polydactylism is not considered a bad one) and anomolies are exactly that ... a thing that occurs and no one can explain why.
post #23 of 24
Even if it was a deformity it does no harm to the cat. The cat is not affected one bit by it. I think if you have a problem with one mutation you should have a problem with them all, especially the ones that have mutations that affect the animals health in some way.
I personally don't have a problem with mutations that do not in any way compromise the health of the cat/animal.
post #24 of 24
bengalbabe......I'm with you on this one 8*) PROUDLY owned by a *big-footed* Pixie-Bob
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