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Will Foreign countries send aid to Katrina victims? - Page 2

post #31 of 131
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
Wow. That's harsh. That slant never even entered my mind...

Besides the tsunami in Indonesia, where has a worst natural disaster happened? OK, so it may not be physically affecting the whole country since this is a HUGE country, but this has devastated hundreds of square miles. There are, right now, 500,000 people from New Orleans alone who are essentially homeless. The governor of Mississippi said today that 90% of the buildings on the gulf coast of his state are destroyed. According to the banner headline on cnn.com, there are 78,000 people in shelters right now (there was no link so I don't know how inclusive that number is). There are thousands of people (again, in New Orleans alone because that is what is getting the most coverage) who are stuck on rooftops or wandering on the interstates because they have no where to go. Most have not eaten or drank in 2 days. It will take years to recover, if the area can ever recover at all. And this is minimal?

The US does, like it or not, respond to natural disasters around the world with aid, assistance and hard cash in most cases. Not necessarily because we have to, but because it's the right thing to do. Now we need some assistance to deal with this disaster.

Why is it there seems to be some who act like the US doesn't even deserve some help?
post #32 of 131
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatrawfish
What assistance does the US need? I'm not trying to be smart or imply that the US doesn't need assistance. I'm curious, is money needed? More manpower?

I remember with Indonesia at a certain point assistance wasn't useful because people couldn't get to it. It sounds like some of that is happening in New Orleans, there are already a lot of people there helping.

But I will be the first to admit I have a very low understanding of what is going on, so what do we need from other countries?
Maybe not the US in general needs help, but more specifically the victims. Thousands and thousands of people don't even have a home to go back to. No home, no workplace, no clothes, no NOTHING.
post #33 of 131
Thread Starter 
Well it looks like some countries will be giving humanitarian aid to the victims of Katrina.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050831/...NlYwMlJVRPUCUl



Meanwhile, some idiots are rejoicing in this disaster. I hope they rot in hell for celebrating this.
post #34 of 131
MSNBC has reported that Vladimir Putin has offered assistance, as has the Chancellor of Germany. The Pope is "praying and urging the rescue workers to persevere".

The US Navy is sending 4 ships, carrying food, water and medical supplies to the Gulf Coast. Boat owners, from Texas to Florida, are converging to help with rescues.

Evacuees are being bussed to Houston's Astrodome and to shelters in Alabama, Georgia, Texas and the Carolinas.

Until the Army Corps of Engineers can repair the breech in New Orleans' levee, that city is effectively shut down.
post #35 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kellyyfaber
Well it looks like some countries will be giving humanitarian aid to the victims of Katrina.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050831/...NlYwMlJVRPUCUl



Meanwhile, some idiots are rejoicing in this disaster. I hope they rot in hell for celebrating this.

I understand that is your opinion and I can respect that, but I think what you are saying is pretty harsh. Yes what has happened to these people is terrible, and in Northwest Arkansas we are housing people fleeing from the hurricane. In some places though we are not seen in the best of lights. Remember there is two sides to every coin, in some places where we think we are doing the right thing, we are seen as the terrorists. Not nessc. Iraq, but other places in the middle east. If someone from some forigen country was fighting a war in your home town, when you feel they have no business there in the first place, they are seen as being bad. I dont want to hijack (no pun intended) this thread, but to remind people that just because something seems right to one person or one country or one religion, whatever, may not seem right to another. Yes the US is seen as the bad guys in some places, and it may seem that we are getting what we deserve.

What it all comes down to is no matter what anyone feels or thinks about anyone else, we are all human beings, and right now, there are many people who have had their entire lives washed away. They have nothing to go back to, and often smaller families. It doesnt matter if another country decides to help or not. I personally cant control that and neither can most other individuals. What matters is that each and every person does what they can to help. If it is monetary donations, fine. If you can give blood, great. If you decide to train with the red cross and go down there to help, super. In times like this we all have to pull together and help both people and animals try to be safe and healthy, and do as much as we can to help them regain normalcy in their lives.
post #36 of 131
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy_loves_CJ
I understand that is your opinion and I can respect that, but I think what you are saying is pretty harsh. Yes what has happened to these people is terrible, and in Northwest Arkansas we are housing people fleeing from the hurricane. In some places though we are not seen in the best of lights. Remember there is two sides to every coin, in some places where we think we are doing the right thing, we are seen as the terrorists. Not nessc. Iraq, but other places in the middle east. If someone from some forigen country was fighting a war in your home town, when you feel they have no business there in the first place, they are seen as being bad. I dont want to hijack (no pun intended) this thread, but to remind people that just because something seems right to one person or one country or one religion, whatever, may not seem right to another. Yes the US is seen as the bad guys in some places, and it may seem that we are getting what we deserve.

What it all comes down to is no matter what anyone feels or thinks about anyone else, we are all human beings, and right now, there are many people who have had their entire lives washed away. They have nothing to go back to, and often smaller families. It doesnt matter if another country decides to help or not. I personally cant control that and neither can most other individuals. What matters is that each and every person does what they can to help. If it is monetary donations, fine. If you can give blood, great. If you decide to train with the red cross and go down there to help, super. In times like this we all have to pull together and help both people and animals try to be safe and healthy, and do as much as we can to help them regain normalcy in their lives.
I have no sympathy for people who rejoice in the deaths of innocent people by natural disaster. Sorry, but I don't see where I'm being harsh.
post #37 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy_loves_CJ
I understand that is your opinion and I can respect that, but I think what you are saying is pretty harsh. Yes what has happened to these people is terrible, and in Northwest Arkansas we are housing people fleeing from the hurricane. In some places though we are not seen in the best of lights. Remember there is two sides to every coin, in some places where we think we are doing the right thing, we are seen as the terrorists. Not nessc. Iraq, but other places in the middle east. If someone from some forigen country was fighting a war in your home town, when you feel they have no business there in the first place, they are seen as being bad. I dont want to hijack (no pun intended) this thread, but to remind people that just because something seems right to one person or one country or one religion, whatever, may not seem right to another. Yes the US is seen as the bad guys in some places, and it may seem that we are getting what we deserve.
I don't think what Kelly was saying has anything to do with their personal "views." It has to do with the fact that people are rejoicing the suffering of other human beings. Regardless of views, being glad over the suffering of others is SICKENING. Just because we're seen as the bad guys to some doesn't mean them feeling like "we got what we deserve" is acceptable. Would you find it acceptable for groups of Americans to celebrate the suffering of a group of innocent Afghani's if some disaster were to happen there?
post #38 of 131
I know other countries have offered to help.
post #39 of 131
JMO -
We don't need the help. We are the richest country in the world. We have the resources to deal with this. It'll be wonderful if other countries lend a hand, but really...we don't need it, so I don't think we should cririticize other countries if they don't send help. It'd be really cold of them if they didn't, but really. We got the means. It's be like taking up a collection for Bill Gates if his house burnt down. It's a terrible tragedy, but we have the means to deal with it.
I'm sure that we will get some assistance from the international community. And that's great.
I think what we might need most is engineers from the Netherlands to help in the rebuilding of the city. Most of Holland is below sea level, so they are experts at keeping water out!

BWT- I have read reports that the death toll in N'awlins alone might be in the 1000's.
A beautiful historic city is possibly gone as we know it forever, people's home and communities are leveled, so many are dead....
This is a huge deal, and here we are arguing over whether or not other countries should or will send us help....
Call the Red Cross. Call the Salvation Army. Call the Humane Society (lots of people are caring for the humans; let's make sure their beloved pets don't get forgotten).
post #40 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe'n'MissKitty
This is a huge deal, and here we are arguing over whether or not other countries should or will send us help....
Come on people, just pull together on this one.

Your country needs you!!
post #41 of 131
i think some countries will send aid. at least i hope they do.

what im really wondering is will all these big name celbrities and such donate money like they did for the tsunami. i would like to see everyone who had there name out the for publicity saying they donated money to the tsunami give money to new orleans. i really doubt this will happen. it should have already happened. if it doesnt then our country has serious issues.
post #42 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe'n'MissKitty
JMO -
We don't need the help... <snip>
No, we don't "need" the help, but in this case it's the gesture that counts.
post #43 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoe'n'MissKitty
JMO -
We don't need the help. We are the richest country in the world. We have the resources to deal with this. It'll be wonderful if other countries lend a hand, but really...we don't need it, so I don't think we should cririticize other countries if they don't send help. It'd be really cold of them if they didn't, but really. We got the means. It's be like taking up a collection for Bill Gates if his house burnt down. It's a terrible tragedy, but we have the means to deal with it.
I'm sure that we will get some assistance from the international community. And that's great.
I think what we might need most is engineers from the Netherlands to help in the rebuilding of the city. Most of Holland is below sea level, so they are experts at keeping water out!

BWT- I have read reports that the death toll in N'awlins alone might be in the 1000's.
A beautiful historic city is possibly gone as we know it forever, people's home and communities are leveled, so many are dead....
This is a huge deal, and here we are arguing over whether or not other countries should or will send us help....
Call the Red Cross. Call the Salvation Army. Call the Humane Society (lots of people are caring for the humans; let's make sure their beloved pets don't get forgotten).
We don't need help?
Don't we really? Yersterday I saw many people on the news down there saying they don't have food, water, and haven't seen any help.
post #44 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by katspixiedust
I don't think what Kelly was saying has anything to do with their personal "views." It has to do with the fact that people are rejoicing the suffering of other human beings. Regardless of views, being glad over the suffering of others is SICKENING. Just because we're seen as the bad guys to some doesn't mean them feeling like "we got what we deserve" is acceptable. Would you find it acceptable for groups of Americans to celebrate the suffering of a group of innocent Afghani's if some disaster were to happen there?
There are always religious wackos with extreme views and I do not mean just the foreign brand. For example, Stan Goodenough believe that "What America is about to experience is the lifting of God's hand of protection; the implementation of His judgment on the nation most responsible for endangering the land and people of Israel," Goodenough writes. "The Bible talks about Him shaking His fist over bodies of water, and striking them."

Just as every natural disaster brings pain and tragedy, it also brings out the religious wackos who claims the disaster is sent by god for things done.
post #45 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kellyyfaber
Funny.....I don't recall making the claim that the US was the most generous. I don't recall ANYONE making that claim in this thread. I don't understand why you made this point in a thread about a tragedy that has occurred in our nation. Don't kick a man while he's down.
Others have answered this for you already, but I was simply responding to Cklbv's post about how the (US) gives "more than anyone by far"..

On that note, Canada's Red Cross is sending 100 volunteers down there asap to help.

The ironic thing is that we were planning a trip down to New Orleans in about a month. I asked BF if we should possibly go down there to help instead. He vetoed that by asking how we would pay our rent for that couple of months that we were down there.
I am going to still think about it. Maybe if we just went for a week or so, we could still accomplish something.
post #46 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
Wow. That's harsh. That slant never even entered my mind...

Besides the tsunami in Indonesia, where has a worst natural disaster happened? OK, so it may not be physically affecting the whole country since this is a HUGE country, but this has devastated hundreds of square miles. There are, right now, 500,000 people from New Orleans alone who are essentially homeless. The governor of Mississippi said today that 90% of the buildings on the gulf coast of his state are destroyed. According to the banner headline on cnn.com, there are 78,000 people in shelters right now (there was no link so I don't know how inclusive that number is). There are thousands of people (again, in New Orleans alone because that is what is getting the most coverage) who are stuck on rooftops or wandering on the interstates because they have no where to go. Most have not eaten or drank in 2 days. It will take years to recover, if the area can ever recover at all. And this is minimal?

The US does, like it or not, respond to natural disasters around the world with aid, assistance and hard cash in most cases. Not necessarily because we have to, but because it's the right thing to do. Now we need some assistance to deal with this disaster.

Why is it there seems to be some who act like the US doesn't even deserve some help?
I think I love you.
post #47 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
We don't need help?
Don't we really? Yersterday I saw many people on the news down there saying they don't have food, water, and haven't seen any help.
I think what she meant was, we don't need help from other countries. Yes, of course the victims need help. But do they need Russia to come help them? Or can the US help them?
post #48 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatrawfish
I think what she meant was, we don't need help from other countries. Yes, of course the victims need help. But do they need Russia to come help them? Or can the US help them?
Can US help them? You tell me. So far, we haven't been doing so hot.
post #49 of 131
1. I stand by what I said, we give more than any other country. In many
ways and things. I don't care about "per capita" of whatever. Add it all
up and the total is what I care about.

2. we do need help, people are still on roofs down there for God's sake.

3. If you want to do something, go out and give blood. It is free and it WILL
help.

Lastly, I cannot believe the bickering of this horrible situation. We should be glad and give thanks that we are sitting in our safe little houses, chilling in the AC, and munching down on PLENTY to eat.
post #50 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
We don't need help?
Don't we really? Yersterday I saw many people on the news down there saying they don't have food, water, and haven't seen any help.
I hear they haven't seen any help yet as it takes a few days for rescue agencies to be able to co-ordinate and arrange the transportation methods of distributing the large cargos of food/drink/med. supplies. These trucks are supposedly being filled as we type and are making their way down to the critical areas but that this will take a few days. The problem is there is little to no communication between the survivors and the rescue crews. T.V/Radios/phones/cells/ are all out.
post #51 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
Can US help them? You tell me. So far, we haven't been doing so hot.
That could be true, I'm not well read enough on what is happening. I'm just not sure how we expect any other country to do any better when we are having so much trouble. Maybe they DO have better rescue workers, I certainly don't know.

FYI I do think other countries who are In A Position To Offer Aid should (and are, so what's the debate about?), but I also think the US should be able to help itself as well.
post #52 of 131
This is the text of an email that a friend of mine sent to our local Rotary club. I agree with these sentiments wholeheartedly. (I'm Canadian).

Quote:
Like all of you I am horrified by the scenes of the devastation and suffering as the result of the assault of Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast U.S. States. The Canadian Red Cross is in the process of providing help and support to out friendly southern neighbours in distress.

...

I have already made a donation. Our American friends and relatives, are always first in line to provide both financial and material help wherever it is required in the world in every disaster. We have the opportunity to show now our real concern for their suffering at this time.
post #53 of 131
Also, just a note to my fellow Canadians, its not advisable for us to donate physical items due to the high costs of transporting these items to the US.

This is an excerpt from the Canadian Red Cross' 2005 Hurricane Relief Fund.
At the bottom is the link to how you can donate in CDN dollars to allow the Canadian Red Cross volunteers to go down and help and to purchase local US items.

"In-kind donations of food, clothing and other items, while well intentioned, are not the best way to help those in need. There are tremendous processing and transportation costs involved in shipping these items to beneficiaries. Local purchases of food and clothing are more culturally appropriate and effective. Red Cross supplies can be purchased in the immediate area, thereby reducing transportation costs. Cash transfers to the affected region provide the optimum flexibility to our Red Cross colleagues so they can meet the most urgent needs. "

http://www.redcross.ca/article.asp?id=014034&tid=001
post #54 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpy
There are always religious wackos with extreme views and I do not mean just the foreign brand. For example, Stan Goodenough believe that "What America is about to experience is the lifting of God's hand of protection; the implementation of His judgment on the nation most responsible for endangering the land and people of Israel," Goodenough writes. "The Bible talks about Him shaking His fist over bodies of water, and striking them."

Just as every natural disaster brings pain and tragedy, it also brings out the religious wackos who claims the disaster is sent by god for things done.
Right, I'm not saying that these things don't happen every time a tragedy strikes. These people may have the right to believe that innocent people or the country in general deserve something like this, but that doesn't make it any less disturbing. IMO, sensitivity is not necessary to the viewpoints of those who lack the sensitivity to sympathize with anothers suffering. I was replying in response to the feeling that Kelly needed to be more understanding of the beliefs of those making these statements.
post #55 of 131
Understand this IS a national disaster. The Port of New Orleans is the busiest in the nation and supplies the entire central part of the US. The bulk of the food grown in the the plains states is shipped down the Mississippi basin through New Orleans. The ports in that region handle more oil than any other area in the country.

As for donations, I've seen those numbers before and they are carefully compiled to only include specific sources of funding and do not reflect total donations (clearly indicating a bias in the reporting). The bulk of US contributions to international disaster relief are and historically always have been from private donations (not included in those numbers.) The military resources and human services provided are not included. (For example, the carrier fleet that sailed into Indonesia had a HUGE impact on the relief efforts, but this very expensive contribution is not included.) International Red Cross relief in largely funded and staffed by the US (there are major contributions from other countries.) Doctors without Borders is largely funded and staffed by US personnel. UNICEF is largely funded by the US (including heavy private donations which are, again, not included.) Programs provided by churches and other organizations, all privately funded, are not included. (The Presbyterian Church alone provides as much in medical and educational services as some small countries.) When all things are included the Americans absolutely ARE the most generous people in the world. (These numbers were published after the condemnations following the disaster in Indonesia.)

Why the current condemnation? Remember the Indonesian disaster and the condemnation of the US? Where are those UN people (and others) now? My guess is they're out finding other programs such as the Oil for Food program that they can use to skim off for their own profit.

Want some history:
-When the flooding hit along the Mississippi in 1969, no one else helped (and one Canadian broadcaster recorded a record about this - in disgust with his own country.)
-When earthquakes hit the west coast, no one came
-When earthquakes and fires hit Anchorage and the surrounding area, no one came
-When massive hurricanes hit Eastern North Carolina and devistated the state for hundreds of miles inland, no one came
-Where was the international assistance when multiple hurricanes tore through Florida?

-When the world was rebuilt after WWII the US was there, largely funding and providing resources through the American manufacturing capabilities. (Though the politically correct are now trying to alter the reality of this period.)
-When there were floods in India which killed tens of thousands the Americans were there providing relief
-When the earthquakes and mud slides hit Mexico, the Americans were there
-Time after time the Americans have responded on a massive scale to disasters around the world. We do it not for recognition, but because it is the right thing to do.

And now? Yes, we do need help. The impact of this disaster will be felt for years, maybe decades. The scale of the logistical nightmare is overwhelming. Relief materials have to be moved into this area, and the infrastructure that is essential for this movement has been devistated (roads, bridges, railways, even waterways are now dangerous and not easily navigated.) Trained personnel must be moved in to coordinate and direct the relief efforts, and now it seems they need to be provided protection from a violent criminal element (probably a very small number, but still dangerous.) The people still in the area need to be moved to safe areas and their needs provided for (and some will still need to be found!) Communication needs to be re-established to coordinate the efforts and provide an ability for people outside the region to contact their loved ones in the area. The levees need to be patched and the water pumped from low lying areas. The port needs to be repaired and brought back into operation as quickly as possible (including essential associated services.) The longer this massive port is shut down the greater the impact on the entire country (and the world for that matter - since so much of the exported food goes through there.) Other essential ports in the area need to be brought back into operation. Refineries and pumping stations need to be brought back on line. Infrastructure needs to be repaired at least to the point it can be used to transport people and materials to central points.

And then the rebuilding can begin.

On top of it all, someone fired at a helicopter this morning so all rescue and relief efforts have been shut down for several hours.
post #56 of 131
I think the majority of people feel that if we can take care of helping other countries in crisis, we should be able to handle our own in a crisis.

I do know Venezuela offered to help and I thought I remembered hearing about Germany offering to help as well. Also, there have probably been more offers of help we haven't heard about because the media is so caught up in what is happening down there right now. We don't know other countries haven't offered to help.
post #57 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by eatrawfish
That could be true, I'm not well read enough on what is happening. I'm just not sure how we expect any other country to do any better when we are having so much trouble. Maybe they DO have better rescue workers, I certainly don't know.

FYI I do think other countries who are In A Position To Offer Aid should (and are, so what's the debate about?), but I also think the US should be able to help itself as well.
I know many countries have offered to help, but I don't think we have accepted any help from other countries so far. Meanwhile, the help effort we do seem completely disorganized and very slow. The people on the news down there say they haven't gotten any food or water and it's not like people are going to last forever unless they have a clean water to drink.
post #58 of 131
You know what? I honestly think we do need help. It will cost billions to repair the infrastructure alone. That's not counting what it will cost to stage temporary communities for the refugees. That's not counting feeding, clothing, or providing basic amenities (i.e. showers) for thousands of people for up to a year. Or helping them to get back on their feet once the area is re-built. They won't have any money to buy new homes, or have deposits for rental housing. Many won't have cars, nor the means to get one.
post #59 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
I know many countries have offered to help, but I don't think we have accepted any help from other countries so far. Meanwhile, the help effort we do seem completely disorganized and very slow. The people on the news down there say they haven't gotten any food or water and it's not like people are going to last forever unless they have a clean water to drink.
Efforts to rescue and bring necessities take quite some time. They absolutely are doing what they can right now to help the people there. As someone else mentioend, the trucks to deliver food and water are continually being loaded up. Helicopters have been flying over to search for those who need to be rescued from rooftops; however, a/some looter/s shot at a helicopter and efforts had to be shut down for a few hours. There are also buses going in and out of the city to transport those still in the Superdome or other places to get them out of there. I know two people at my university whose hometown was New Orleans and I have heard them say that whatever can be done to rescue people, is being done. You just don't hear about it as much on the news, and quite frankly, it just can't be done fast enough. The flood waters are incredibly dangerous and practically all means of getting to the city are impassible. So help is coming, and more than we'll get to see from the news, but it will take a considerable amount of time.
post #60 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by katspixiedust
Efforts to rescue and bring necessities take quite some time. They absolutely are doing what they can right now to help the people there. As someone else mentioend, the trucks to deliver food and water are continually being loaded up. Helicopters have been flying over to search for those who need to be rescued from rooftops; however, a/some looter/s shot at a helicopter and efforts had to be shut down for a few hours. There are also buses going in and out of the city to transport those still in the Superdome or other places to get them out of there. I know two people at my university whose hometown was New Orleans and I have heard them say that whatever can be done to rescue people, is being done. You just don't hear about it as much on the news, and quite frankly, it just can't be done fast enough. The flood waters are incredibly dangerous and practically all means of getting to the city are impassible. So help is coming, and more than we'll get to see from the news, but it will take a considerable amount of time.
Unfortunately, human beings don't last for quite some time without food or water.
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