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What would ovarian cysts do to a cat?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I took my formerly-feral cat, Elsa, in to the vet today to get her spayed. (Finally, yay! ) The clinic called me to let me know all had gone well, but both her ovaries had multiple cysts.

She's been biting me for a few days when I touch her sides, and has been really hissy with the other cats, so that probably explains that. Has anyone ever had a cat with these? Will the cat become a bit better tempered? Thanks, Kim.
post #2 of 9
As a human with them, sometimes they don't do anything and go away on their own, but sometimes they ar too big and need to be removed. Perhaps ask your vet what options you have.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
My understanding is that they removed the ovaries with the uterus. I was just hoping I'd get back a little better-tempered cat! So I was just seeing if anyone else had experienced it. Thanks!
post #4 of 9
I would have thought that now she is spayed there wont be any problems.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
She's back home, and you're right - she seems much better. Poor thing. I thought she was just bad-tempered, and she was in pain.
post #6 of 9
Just so you know, and I have told this story a few times here but my bf had a pretty nasty little female cat that he found and she gave plenty of bites and scratches before she was spayed. I watched her being spayed and it turns out that she had ovarian cysts as well.
The cysts are part of what they remove when they do the spay. I don't know all the technical terms and what exactly is removed, I just watched it but I do know that they did remove the cysts and that is probably what they did with your cat too. After she was spayed and the cysts were gone, it took a few days to recover but now she is the happiest little cat ever. She is affectionate, loving and sweet and if you annoy her she will just growl a warning instead of biting your arm off. That is my experience with ovarian cysts, I don't know if it is similar for all cats, but I hope it helps.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta
I took my formerly-feral cat, Elsa, in to the vet today to get her spayed. (Finally, yay! ) The clinic called me to let me know all had gone well, but both her ovaries had multiple cysts.

She's been biting me for a few days when I touch her sides, and has been really hissy with the other cats, so that probably explains that. Has anyone ever had a cat with these? Will the cat become a bit better tempered? Thanks, Kim.
So what if the cat had ovarian cysts? The only way that would have affected her was when she was whole - it would have caused her to come into multiple heats but even if she was bred she wouldn't have become pregnant nor would she have stopped going in and out of heat constantly.

You said she was formerly feral. Not entirely "formerly" apparently. When your cat was spayed, what the vets performed was known as an ovio-hysterectomy (I sure can't spell). Did they see fit to give her pain medication after the spay? It's perfectly normal for cats who get along well with their companions at home to behave hissy and cranky when they come home, and the cats they live with to be hissy at them, since they smell like the vet's office.

BTW, removing the ovaries does not instantaneously stop the hormone levels which were already quite high if she had ovarian cysts and had probably been cycling very often. Neutering or spaying does not change a cat's underlying personality - it merely reduces the sex drive.

Barb Amalfi
post #8 of 9
Hi Kim,

This may be totally useless information., but in humans ovarian cysts are extremely common among those of us diagnosed with hyperthyroid later. Much more common than the general population, or I would not bother you with this little tid-bit.

So... since they do not know why kitties or humans end up hyperthyroid... it may be a good thing to keep in mind years from now when your girl is older. The main reason is the symptoms are normally passed off as something else for a long time. This creates a situation where the disease has caused damage to all the bodies systems and organs. Much more difficult to treat then. And very easy to treat if it's caught early.

So...Notice the symptoms lists, and listen for a bit when some one you know has a hyperthyroid kitty. It could save you and kitty a lot of grief.
Girl Scout motto...remember ? "Be Prepared."

-Pam L-
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
I probably wasn't very clear with my question.

There was a cat at my work living under a trailer. She ran away from humans, but I fed her for a few months and got her used to me. Then I noticed she was in heat, and didn't really know what to do, and of course she got pregnant. Three weeks before she gave birth, I took her to the vet and had her tested so I could take her home with my cats. So...she had 8 kittens in April.

She is a bit standoffish to the rest of the family, but usually she's ok to me. So I was surprised that for the past week she's nipped at me when I petted her. Not to mention that (you're right...!) she's been in heat almost constantly since the kittens were weaned!

So...I took her to be spayed Friday, and found out about the cysts. I knew they'd take both the ovaries and the uterus, which they did. I was just wondering if anyone knew if that was probably what was making her nip at me.

Probably a better question would have been..."do ovarian cysts hurt when cats have them?"

Thanks so much for the replies. I just thought I garbled it a little in my first post, so I thought I'd set it straight. I picked her up from the vet that same day, and I do think she feels a lot better, and that the ovarian cysts DID hurt!
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