TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › C. Fla. teacher ousted after controversial letter
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

C. Fla. teacher ousted after controversial letter

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Part of the story: An Orange County elementary school teacher was suspended Wednesday over a letter asking for laws to be changed to prevent Puerto Ricans from coming to Orlando because they are "destroying the city every day," according to a WKMG Local 6 News report.
http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbc...GNEWS/50818002
post #2 of 18
Good for the school system . If she feels that way, who knows what racist ideas she could be putting in these kids' minds?
post #3 of 18
Ok here's my thoughts on Puerto Rico. Either become a state or cut ties complely. They can enjoy all the comforts of being an american without actully being americans. They don't pay taxes, but are able to vote in the primaries. I say ask them if they are in or out, if they are in great.... they are are 51st state, if not, fine see ya bye. Stop giving them money can stop protecting them. Kick them out like a 42yr old still living at home. But that's just me

But I do agree with the school district.
post #4 of 18
There are so many problems with this woman being a role model and leader of children, I don't know where to start:

Firstly, her obviously racist and exclusive statements. But she also goes on to criticize her fellow teachers, includes a run-on sentence in her letter and "forgets" who she wrote the letter to when asked....It seems like there is something really amiss with this woman.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ugaimes
Good for the school system . If she feels that way, who knows what racist ideas she could be putting in these kids' minds?
Exactly! She has probably already had an impact on some of them. Teachers should be very careful what they say to kids. Can you believe that when I was in 4th grade my teacher actually said "anyone who is not Catholic will burn in hell." I was Protestant told my Mom what she said. My Mom told me to ask her what faith Jesus Christ was.
post #6 of 18
How about Ward Churchill the college Prof in Colorado that gave a speech saying all the victims of 9-11 were little Eichman's? Nice really nice.
He is director of Indian Studies or something. Come to find out he doesn't have one drop of Native American blood. A real role model,that one.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv
How about Ward Churchill the college Prof in Colorado that gave a speech saying all the victims of 9-11 were little Eichman's? Nice really nice.
He is director of Indian Studies or something. Come to find out he doesn't have one drop of Native American blood. A real role model,that one.
Churchill is being investigated for ethics, copyright and plagarism violations, which he could be fired for. Being an @$$ and saying those things (I've read the essay, which was horrible, but he did say "some" of those killed, not all.) and many more in his speeches was found to be covered under the First Amendment so he can't be fired for that. With the major public outcry in Colorado, he darn well better be fired!!!

Sorry for the hijack.
post #8 of 18
Wow, when it comes to political correctness, this lady is a real klutz!! That said, it would be interesting to see if any of her complaints have merit. The article mentioned the anger from the Hispanic parents; I would have liked to seen some feedback from the other side. As school budgets become tighter, I'm afraid this kind of squabbling will become more prevalent.
post #9 of 18
Quote:
"Schools are dealing with too many problems which originate in the language differences and that takes teaching time away from our American children whose parents do pay taxes," the letter said.
I can see her point. I really can. I dont want to sound racist but, when half of your kids in your class do not speak english, and you have an aide translating everything you say to the kids that dont speak english, it gets very time consuming. Then if they ask questions the question has to be translated for you and then the answer has to be translated to them. The english speaking kids only get about half the lesson being taught and the other half waiting for things to be translated to the other kids. I know that it is not the kids fault for not speaking english, and they shouldnt be punished. In some areas up here the hispanic kids out number the american kids, and many of them are illegal (sounds mean but it is true. Tyson admits to employing thousands of illegal citizens.)

Most of the hispanic kids are on free or reduced lunch and breakfasts. So for someone to say no, let them in, we will teach them all, does not realize how much of a strain it really does put on the school systems. You cannot have more than 24 kids in one class. People that live in the town pay taxes that support the school. If someone does not pay taxes then they do not help support the school. The state pays the teachers, and taxes build new classrooms. If you have 100 kids whose parents do not pay taxes in every grade (not uncommon here at all, sometimes it is more than that) you have to have 5 extra classrooms for these children, as well as 5 new teachers. This money is taken from other areas that need it (like music and art programs). This is money that could be used to buy books or computers or other things the school needs.

Another thing is the no child left behind thing and standardized testing. If a school tests below the government standards they are put on a warning and have 4 years to bring up their scores. The tests they used are standardized tests which are very VERY biased to white middle class students. Many tests are at least 10 years old. So you have students who are esl (english as a second language) trying to take a test in a language they may or may not be fluent in. Tests scores drop (not because the kids are stupid, I couldnt take a standardized test in spanish and do any better) and the school tries to find ways to bring up their scores. This means concentrating on the students who did poorly on the test before, leaving the students who did really well, or even just average to sit there and wait for others to catch up, generally the esl students. If this test was fair, which is much harder than it sounds, taking in account both language and cultural differences (how can a kid who has never seen snow know what you wear when it snows? ) then maybe schools wouldnt be so worried about teaching the test, and on the same hand would not see the esl kids as such a problem. Schools are graded and held accountable for their test scores, much of which is beyond their control.

I guess to sum it all up, I see and understand where she is coming from, but she could have worded it better and explained her reasoning for feeling so. If it is just because they are not american kids, then yes she is wrong. If it is because of things she is seeing, and facts like those above, then she does have a point and should try to do something to help the situation not just call the problem out and expect someone else to decide to fix it. I used hispanics because that is what we deal the most with over here. I have no problem with the kids, I just get frusterated with the situation.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy_loves_CJ
I can see her point. I really can. I dont want to sound racist but, when half of your kids in your class do not speak english, and you have an aide translating everything you say to the kids that dont speak english, it gets very time consuming. Then if they ask questions the question has to be translated for you and then the answer has to be translated to them. The english speaking kids only get about half the lesson being taught and the other half waiting for things to be translated to the other kids. I know that it is not the kids fault for not speaking english, and they shouldnt be punished. In some areas up here the hispanic kids out number the american kids, and many of them are illegal (sounds mean but it is true. Tyson admits to employing thousands of illegal citizens.)

Most of the hispanic kids are on free or reduced lunch and breakfasts. So for someone to say no, let them in, we will teach them all, does not realize how much of a strain it really does put on the school systems. You cannot have more than 24 kids in one class. People that live in the town pay taxes that support the school. If someone does not pay taxes then they do not help support the school. The state pays the teachers, and taxes build new classrooms. If you have 100 kids whose parents do not pay taxes in every grade (not uncommon here at all, sometimes it is more than that) you have to have 5 extra classrooms for these children, as well as 5 new teachers. This money is taken from other areas that need it (like music and art programs). This is money that could be used to buy books or computers or other things the school needs.

Another thing is the no child left behind thing and standardized testing. If a school tests below the government standards they are put on a warning and have 4 years to bring up their scores. The tests they used are standardized tests which are very VERY biased to white middle class students. Many tests are at least 10 years old. So you have students who are esl (english as a second language) trying to take a test in a language they may or may not be fluent in. Tests scores drop (not because the kids are stupid, I couldnt take a standardized test in spanish and do any better) and the school tries to find ways to bring up their scores. This means concentrating on the students who did poorly on the test before, leaving the students who did really well, or even just average to sit there and wait for others to catch up, generally the esl students. If this test was fair, which is much harder than it sounds, taking in account both language and cultural differences (how can a kid who has never seen snow know what you wear when it snows? ) then maybe schools wouldnt be so worried about teaching the test, and on the same hand would not see the esl kids as such a problem. Schools are graded and held accountable for their test scores, much of which is beyond their control.

I guess to sum it all up, I see and understand where she is coming from, but she could have worded it better and explained her reasoning for feeling so. If it is just because they are not american kids, then yes she is wrong. If it is because of things she is seeing, and facts like those above, then she does have a point and should try to do something to help the situation not just call the problem out and expect someone else to decide to fix it. I used hispanics because that is what we deal the most with over here. I have no problem with the kids, I just get frusterated with the situation.
Very, very thought provoking post.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv
Very, very thought provoking post.
Yes, a point well made. A point I can agree with.
post #12 of 18
She must be related to Anita Bryant! Bigot pure and simple. I do have one question though, and certainly not in her defense. If she wrote this letter to a public official, did he have a right to send it to a newspaper. While I guess the reciever can do anything he wants when the letter is in his hands, what about privacy. I would hate to think if I wrote anything personal (lets say my personal medical history) that it might become public record. Maybe I missed somethin in the article.
post #13 of 18
The article states that it was sent to a congressman and published in a local paper..Though it doesn't state whether the congressman in fact handed over the letter or the media simply got a hold of it or she perhaps, herself, sent out other copies to the media..Its not really clear.
I could see the congressman bringing it the attention of the school board first (in a perfect world) and the media simply got wind of it...

I don't know the history of how Puerto Rico became part of the US and what the relations are at present..Why are people that come to the US tax exempt?
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of Franz
She must be related to Anita Bryant! Bigot pure and simple. I do have one question though, and certainly not in her defense. If she wrote this letter to a public official, did he have a right to send it to a newspaper. While I guess the reciever can do anything he wants when the letter is in his hands, what about privacy. I would hate to think if I wrote anything personal (lets say my personal medical history) that it might become public record. Maybe I missed somethin in the article.
Good point! Sounds like maybe the politician took advantage of the situation when he passed the letter on to a Hispanic newspaper, maybe to earn points with the Hispanic community - it would be a very easy sell!
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme
Good point! Sounds like maybe the politician took advantage of the situation when he passed the letter on to a Hispanic newspaper, maybe to earn points with the Hispanic community - it would be a very easy sell!
It doesn't state though that he passed it on or not. I would think that it would state that if he did.
It simply states he received one AND it was published in the paper....
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveysmummy
The article states that it was sent to a congressman and published in a local paper..Though it doesn't state whether the congressman in fact handed over the letter or the media simply got a hold of it or she perhaps, herself, sent out other copies to the media..Its not really clear.
I could see the congressman bringing it the attention of the school board first (in a perfect world) and the media simply got wind of it...

I don't know the history of how Puerto Rico became part of the US and what the relations are at present..Why are people that come to the US tax exempt?

The US does not know how many people are here. They have no social security numbers, they do not have bank accounts (because you need a social security number to open one). To the system they basically do not exist. You cannot tax people you do not know are there. At their jobs they try to be paid as "contract workers" meaning taxes are not taken out of their paychecks. It is like when you pay the plumber, it is assumed that he will take taxes out of it later.
post #17 of 18
I would like to see some comments about Post #9 by Roxy. Puts a totally different spin on things I feel. I would be irritated if my child was in a class such as Roxy describes and was being held back because of the situation she talks about.
There is more than one side to every story.
But I haven't seen one comment on Roxy's post just a blasting of the teacher that had some good points but doesn't know how to express them in a tactful manner.
post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckblv
I would like to see some comments about Post #9 by Roxy. Puts a totally different spin on things I feel. I would be irritated if my child was in a class such as Roxy describes and was being held back because of the situation she talks about.
There is more than one side to every story.
But I haven't seen one comment on Roxy's post just a blasting of the teacher that had some good points but doesn't know how to express them in a tactful manner.
Here's a thread that I posted: http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=56850
titled "Should we taxpayers fund English as Second Language Classes?". It has some interesting replies. It seemed to me that both sides had excellent representation. I also think that it's difficult to have just one opinion on the subject: it really depends on the situation of the county you're in.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: IMO: In My Opinion
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › C. Fla. teacher ousted after controversial letter