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Read this!

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Taken directly from a letter my vet gave out (I bolded the important points just in case you didn't want to read the entire thing):

New Diet Recommendations for Cats
Timothy J Govers, D.V.M.
Diplomate, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, Avian Specialty

"Good nutrition is the single most important step you can take to improve your cat's health. Yet, most cats are not on a healthy diet, and the veterinary community needs to shoulder a large part of the blame. For years, with the emphasis on dental health, we have been recommending dry foods for cats, thinking "crunching" the dry food is healthier for the teeth and gums. Now, West Valley Pet Clinic is taking a 180 degree turn in recommending canned food over dry food for cats.

Why the dramatic change? The credit goes to Dr. Elizabeth Hodgkins, a veterinarian who has been working on a protocol for the prevention and treatment of feline diabetes, with an emphasis on the role of diet. Here's her reasoning:

During its evolution, the cat became very dependent on meat, high in protein and fat, for energy. The pathway for metabolizing protein for energy production became primary. The cat will even begin to consume its own structural proteins (muscle) for energy during starvation or protein restricted diets. The pathways for metabolizing carbohydrates for energy became less important, and eventually less functional. The bottom line: the cat has a huge protein requirement and a very low carbohydrate need (in fact, cannot handle carbohydrates well at all).

The Problem: all dry cat foods are very high in carbohydrates, and relatively low in protein. This is a requirement in the extrusion process (the process where the food is subjected to high heat and high pressure) that "pops" the food into a pellet. This won't happen unless there is a certain level of carbohydrates. Low quality meat meal is then sprayed on the surface to increase palatability. As a result of this process, the carbohydrates are predigested and easily enter the cat's blood stream as sugar. Corn is the cereal most commonly used in dry cat foods which has a high glycemic index. That is, corn raises the cat's blood sugar levels to high values shortly after eating.

Another Problem: in the same evolutionary process, the signal to the cat that it ate enough (satiety signal) was related to the amount of protein and fat consumed. Consumption of carbohydrates has minimal effect on the satiety signal. As a result, cats over eat dry food since the carbohydrates in the kibble don't satiate them, and constantly overload on sugars. The end result is fat cats, and worse, because the excess sugar causes repeated surges of insulin from pancreatic reserves, diabetic cats.

Compare the types of food. Canned cat foods are relatively high in protein (40-55% on a dry matter basis), moderate fat (25-35% on a dry matter basis), and low carbohydrates (2-8% on a dry matter basis). A dry food will typically have 20-33% protein, 10-25% fat, and 20-50% carbohydrates. And the only reason for these differences is that this dry food ratio is necessary to make a kibble (with no regard to the cat's nutrient requirements).

Of course, not all cats that eat dry food exclusively become obese, or develop diabetes. But an alarming percent do, and it is impossible to predict which individual will. Inherited factors make some animals more resistant to environmental and nutritional maladies than others. Not all people who smoke a pack of cigarettes daily for 60 years will develop emphysema or lung cancer. Yet we don't question the harm of cigarette smoking. For the same reason, we can't ignore the harmful effect of carbohydrate laden dry foods, and we should consider all cats at risk for obesity and diabetes if fed a commercial dry cat food.

ADDITIONALLY, THERE ARE NO SCIENTIFIC STUDIES THAT PROVE DRY FOODS PROVIDE BETTER DENTAL HEALTH THROUGHOUT A CAT'S LIFE THAN WET FOODS DO."
post #2 of 19
good article but most have heard this... Evan the vets where I live are preaching wet food
post #3 of 19
Doesn't surprise me at all...and matches the article I usually post a link to re dental health NOT being worsened by canned food. Thank you for sharing this...I think hearing it from our vets helps
post #4 of 19
I have always done this - and my vet agrees completely. I call the dry food their junk food. Sort of their drive thru stuff, lol For their teeth, I brush them with kitty toothpaste.
post #5 of 19
Good Lord! I have been saying this for years, so it is nice to finally see it in writing from someone who can validate it. After caring for three geezer cats, all diabetics who ate a crap diet of dry food all their lives, it is about time we woke up and understood the real problem with dry food! Thank you for posting this - friends and family have all told me I was nuts for hating dry food the way I do.

~gf~
post #6 of 19
When you think about what a cat was born to eat, mice, moles, gophers, snakes, birds, you will see that those prey items are about 90% liquid. Then man comes along and wants something easier to feed, so dry food was invented. I have long maintained that all this CRF problems result from the lack of liquid in a cat's diet. My guys have gotten primarily wet food now for about 3 years, they munch on dry, but it isn't the primary food here and never will be.
post #7 of 19
So can anyone help me try and get Rosie to eat more wet food?.

Sophies no problem as long as she has the same wet food i give her, but Rosie since being a kitten will only eat a small amount and licks the jelly off but leaves most of the "real" fish chunks.

I've tried every brand under the sun, even the food my vets sell and she still turns her nose up
post #8 of 19
I agree - I have a similar problem, though I have long preferred to feed wet - most cats I have had have only had that. I feed mine wet food night and morning and some dry to snack on - one problem here is that I cannot get quality wet, only Whiskas and Friskies, and so I am reduced to bringing in quality dry (Royal Canin) when I go abroad. That will change next year, I hope, when we move. But Dushka much prefers the dry, only eating a tiny bit of the wet. The others are fine, and Ellie will eat anything in her or anyone else's bowl!
post #9 of 19
My cats don't like canned food either. I haven't tried the Nutro canned yet, but I've tried enough other ones to get the idea that they don't much care for it. I'm leaving for the vet's office with Gizmo in about 15 minutes, I'll ask him. I need to get her on a better weight loss plan, too, and I know dry food can make them overweight. I just wish canned wasn't so expensive! It will cost me more to feed my 2 cats canned food than it does to feed all three of my dogs dry food! And my dogs equal the size of about 16 cats!

Amber
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatkitties
My cats don't like canned food either. I haven't tried the Nutro canned yet, but I've tried enough other ones to get the idea that they don't much care for it. I'm leaving for the vet's office with Gizmo in about 15 minutes, I'll ask him. I need to get her on a better weight loss plan, too, and I know dry food can make them overweight. I just wish canned wasn't so expensive! It will cost me more to feed my 2 cats canned food than it does to feed all three of my dogs dry food! And my dogs equal the size of about 16 cats!

Amber
Have you thought of some homemade ??/

Make sure to try pate as well as gravyed and some very chunked
post #11 of 19
Home made as in?

Rosie has to be the fussiest cat known!. She won't entertain fresh fish of any type, but mackeral is one i havent tried yet!. She won't touch chicken and turkey but she likes the odd piece of chopped up steak on her birthday, christmas etc..and i've tried putting a bit gravy over and still nothing!
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiemac
Home made as in?

Rosie has to be the fussiest cat known!. She won't entertain fresh fish of any type, but mackeral is one i havent tried yet!. She won't touch chicken and turkey but she likes the odd piece of chopped up steak on her birthday, christmas etc..and i've tried putting a bit gravy over and still nothing!
Have you tried freeze-dried chicken? It crunches like dry food...it's how I transitioned my Leo into eating moist cooked chicken.

Granted, that we're stuck in the cooked chicken phase and have been for a good 3 weeks now with no signs of accepting wet food anytime soon...

Let me know if you can get her to eat wet. If you can get Rosie to eat wet food, maybe I'll be able to get Leo to eat it.

As for my kitten, I have had SOME success in mixing wet with chicken, so I guess that's an idea, too.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiemac
So can anyone help me try and get Rosie to eat more wet food?.

Sophies no problem as long as she has the same wet food i give her, but Rosie since being a kitten will only eat a small amount and licks the jelly off but leaves most of the "real" fish chunks.

I've tried every brand under the sun, even the food my vets sell and she still turns her nose up
Mine is like that too. He isn't too interested in wet food.
He does drink a good amount of water though, so that's good.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
Have you tried freeze-dried chicken? It crunches like dry food...
I've never seen it anywhere?, who makes it?

Marge they drink ok so would that do?
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiemac
I've never seen it anywhere?, who makes it?

Marge they drink ok so would that do?
I hope so. I mean we can't force feed them, and I note he does go for a drink after each dry food eating.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosiemac
So can anyone help me try and get Rosie to eat more wet food?.

Sophies no problem as long as she has the same wet food i give her, but Rosie since being a kitten will only eat a small amount and licks the jelly off but leaves most of the "real" fish chunks.

I've tried every brand under the sun, even the food my vets sell and she still turns her nose up
I will try to help but what brands do you have??

Rosie likes jelly??? have you tried graveys or the few fancy feast flavors without by products??
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
I will try to help but what brands do you have??

Rosie likes jelly??? have you tried graveys or the few fancy feast flavors without by products??
I've never seen Fancy Feast over here?!

I've tried Whiskas(pouches and tinned), Felix, Gourmet Gold and Petit Pate( she used to eat those, but turns her nose up at them now! ) Hills Science wet food, Sheba.

All the other brands that the supermarkets sell are cheap in price like whiskas, so i don't like to give them those ones

We have a department store over here who do their own line of foods, clothing etc... and are known for quality, so when i tried them on their "Luxury" Sardine in lobster jelly wet food they loved it!, plus this one has chunks of sardines in!.

I don't understand though when i give her fresh she looks at me as if to say "if you think i'm eating that!"

I wonder if she would eat tinned sardines?, or would they be bad for her?
post #18 of 19
Good news!!!I have always done this too - and my vet agrees completely. I call the dry food their junk food. , lol For their teeth, I brush them with kitty toothpaste.


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post #19 of 19
I spoke to my vet breifly about food/weight (my daughter was making a bunch of noise and interrupting me, though!). His personal feelings were that dry food is good for the teeth, BUT it should make up a small portion of the diet, and canned is better. He suggested I go with the Nutro Indoor Weight Management food for dry, and the Nutro cans for the majoirty of the diet. So tomrrow I'll pick out a few of the more popular flavors and see what they think. Gizmo has GAINED a pound since last year, NOT good!

Amber
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