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Help: about declaw

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hello, i'm from Israel,

There are efforts to make this surgery illegal in Israel, to do this i need Material and opinions from vets.
Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks a had.
Ravit
post #2 of 24
Ravit, contact valanhb I believe she has a pamphlet that you might find useful. Good luck getting this unneccessary surgery banned in your country-

You can find valanhb posts on the board and send her a private message-
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 
post #4 of 24
Declawing IS illeagal in most civilized countries. And thankfully some municipalities in both the US and Canada - who due to lack of education or profit motives of some vets - continue the practice. (sighhhhhhhhhhh!!) - have taken steps to ban the procedure. I am glad to hear Israel has joined the rest of the world in banning this horrible practice. Good for them!!! And thx for the info.

Perhaps with the recent info in that country - greater awareness about feline health and rescue work (and many cats surrendered due to behaviour probs changed post their horrible declaw surgery so perhaps these rescues in that country looked at the stats and realized how awful the procedure is and the psychological and sometimes medical toll it takes on kitties. We certainly know it takes a phsyical toll - that is a given)

Good luck in getting this legislation passed!
post #5 of 24
in canada declawing is legal...my sister got it done with her to cats and they are doing really well....they r indoor cats and never been outside since she got them..


I don't think declawing should be illegal....


why do you think that anyways???
post #6 of 24
Please if anyone feels they must debate the declaw issue, do so in the existing thread in IMO. I will scare up the link

Here's a declaw debate
post #7 of 24
Yay for you in helping get this legislation passed. Declawing is a vicious, awful practice and should be banned every, IMO.

There is plenty of information on the internet, and also this site has some good articles on declawing as well - see the link below:

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/sho...&threadid=8450

Good luck!
post #8 of 24
We have a lot of resources about Declawing on Stray Pet Advocacy, including our article (that has also been published here on TCS) that takes a non-biased look at the procedure. We have it both as HTML and as a PDF. On the SPA page Declaw = Detoe (yes, we are very anti-declaw, but do still try to find objective articles when available) we have the sections: What is Declawing?, Official Position Statements on Declawing (including from veterinary organizations), and Alternatives to Declawing.

I hope this helps!
post #9 of 24
I think you are doing a wonderful thing. Although I don't think declawing is illegal in the UK, it certainly isnt something that is done very often - in fact, I have never heard of it being done.
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrAzYbAsH
in canada declawing is legal...my sister got it done with her to cats and they are doing really well....they r indoor cats and never been outside since she got them..


I don't think declawing should be illegal....


why do you think that anyways???
As you said, it is legal in Canada, but many vets I've known refuse to do it. I was interested in doing it to my cats at one time but my vet talked me out of it, and I'm so glad she did now that I've become more educated on the practice of declawing. And I was happy that she is more interested in animal welfare than making a quick buck.
post #11 of 24
For some reason I can't post on Hissy's thread because it says I'm not authorized....

I truly don't mean to be argumentative, but it is my TRUE feeling that people who declaw are just lazy and looking for a "quick fix". Many people get a kitty because they know the reputation of it being "independent" - but that doesn't mean that a certain amount of training is not involved. Just like any living, breathing being - training to a certain extent is ALWAYS necessary.

This might sounds harsh, but think about it - how many people have puppies and are exasperated because they are chewing (and therefore damaging) everything! How would society react if you just started ripping their teeth out?

How about human babies when they start doing something bad? If they steal? Should you chop off their fingers?

ok kitties claw....TRAIN them appropriately! Give them access to scratching pads/posts right where they sleep AND eat! That means more than one! If that doesn't work, sometimes the water bottle will (if they are young). If that doesn't work, then try different sprays (the internet is a wealth of information on this). If this doesn't work then try Soft Paws/Soft Claws, they are little caps that fit on the end of their nails and are actually quite reasonable in price (considering the cost of replacing furniture). There are also furniture corners you can try, or tin foil on furniture...etc etc etc

This is why I say people who declaw are lazy. I have yet to see "something" out of this list NOT work. It does take patience, unfortunately some people don't have that.

As for personally...I know of 3 people who have declawed their cats - and this is no lie, I can provide references - the first one, her cat took 6 months to heal and she has admittedly told me (without me asking) "She absolutely suffered. I was so worried about her because her personality totally changed after. I will never do that again"....Friend number 2 "She couldn't walk for about a month properly. Even now, she has trouble jumping, it's like she can't gauge her distance anymore"....Friend number 3 "If I had known what I know now I never would have done it. He is SOOOO aggressive with my other cats. He BITES them because he can't fight any other way."

Those are honest feedbacks I've received from people that I know, they are not friends per se except #1 but just people I know. I really hope to educate people, even if it's one at a time, but with the proliferation of the internet now-a-days, there really is no excuse.

Declawing should be outlawed, and those who do it, are just to lazy to research and commit to the alternatives out there.

Sorry this was long. But it is an issue I'm passionate about, when they don't have ANY CHOICE in it!

Lora
post #12 of 24
Declawing should be outlawed, and those who do it, are just to lazy to research and commit to the alternatives out there.

post #13 of 24
Is there a place you can go to find out the countries, municipalties etc that HAVE banned the procedure?
post #14 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by booktigger
I think you are doing a wonderful thing. Although I don't think declawing is illegal in the UK, it certainly isnt something that is done very often - in fact, I have never heard of it being done.
Thankfully, it IS illegal here
post #15 of 24
I have heard that declawing can cause litterbox problems. Is this true? I must admit that I did have Rotten declawed when she was much younger and I greatly regret doing so now. Not because she suffered or has issues, other than her annoyingly nasty litterbox problem, but because I have more information and am better educated on the procedure.
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by booktigger
I think you are doing a wonderful thing. Although I don't think declawing is illegal in the UK, it certainly isnt something that is done very often - in fact, I have never heard of it being done.
it is illegal here
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purity
Thankfully, it IS illegal here
whoops, didnt see this post before i posted.
post #18 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for the responses.
All I need is objective information, which meen vets' opinion and detailed stories about declawed cats.
Its very important, in Israel all the vets are unified in their opinions and only few courageous vets object at loud.
I hope soon I'll be able to tell you that this surgery is not legal in Israel too.

Regards,
Ravit
post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ravit2b
Thank you all for the responses.
All I need is objective information, which meen vets' opinion and detailed stories about declawed cats.
Its very important, in Israel all the vets are unified in their opinions and only few courageous vets object at loud.
I hope soon I'll be able to tell you that this surgery is not legal in Israel too.

Regards,
Ravit
before i was 'adopted' by my kittens, i thought declawing was the way to go. then, my sponsor told me that declawing was the equivalent of getting the top third of each of my fingers lopped off

ouch.

best of luck to you and to others brave enough to decry this mutilation.
post #20 of 24
Cheers, as the only site i could find had a list of countries that it was illegal/not practised. We were on it, but didn't know which catagory it came under. I am so glad it is illegal here.

I have heard that declawing can cause litterbox problems. Is this true? I must admit that I did have Rotten declawed when she was much younger and I greatly regret doing so now. Not because she suffered or has issues, other than her annoyingly nasty litterbox problem, but because I have more information and am better educated on the procedure.

Yes, it can cause litterbox problems, as it can hurt them to scratch the litter. Maybe using a very soft litter like something paper based wont be as harsh to her little paws.
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amandaofcols
I have heard that declawing can cause litterbox problems. Is this true? I must admit that I did have Rotten declawed when she was much younger and I greatly regret doing so now. Not because she suffered or has issues, other than her annoyingly nasty litterbox problem, but because I have more information and am better educated on the procedure.
Hi Amandaofcols, yes declawing can and very often does cause litterbox problems. Litter is very hard, and once declawed, stepping on tiny rocks and getting them embedded in their raw toes is extremely painful for them.

Even after healing, some cats remain sensitive to regular clay & crystal litters and may have to use only newspaper pellets. Others also have a tough time adjusting to litter because they have difficulties "burying" it since they can no longer "scoop" or "dig" with their paws anymore when trying to scratch in their litter since part of each toe was amputated.

Hope this helps. And I'm very glad to see that you are reading up on this issue. Good for you! I'm sure Rotten (love that name LOL!) is going to be one very spoiled kitty!

Lora
post #22 of 24
I'm with you!!
post #23 of 24
Here is a list of countries where declawing is illegal: http://www.declawing.com/list.html

Ravit, here is another source with great links about declawing: http://amby.com/cat_site/declaw.html I'm sure there are duplicates of what we have on SPA, but I'm sure they have some we don't.
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by loraandjeff
Hi Amandaofcols, yes declawing can and very often does cause litterbox problems. Litter is very hard, and once declawed, stepping on tiny rocks and getting them embedded in their raw toes is extremely painful for them.

Even after healing, some cats remain sensitive to regular clay & crystal litters and may have to use only newspaper pellets. Others also have a tough time adjusting to litter because they have difficulties "burying" it since they can no longer "scoop" or "dig" with their paws anymore when trying to scratch in their litter since part of each toe was amputated.

Hope this helps. And I'm very glad to see that you are reading up on this issue. Good for you! I'm sure Rotten (love that name LOL!) is going to be one very spoiled kitty!

Lora


Hello.
I have owned 3 cats, and can attest to the fact that they all have had some litterbox issues. All 3 were declawed by previous owners and then just dumped at local shelters/rescue groups because no one seemed to take the time to get to know them and realize what they needed to do for them after being declawed. All of them have needed to use only soft litter (compared to hard crystals), and they all preferred covered litterboxes. One, PJ, doesn't bury most of her stuff in the box and the other, Teddy, ends up with litter in his paws all the time.

That being said, they are wonderful kitties. They're the most loving, friendly, active cats, and I wouldn't trade them for anything else. While I'd never declaw a cat, I do plan to adopt mostly declawed cats in the future because so many are just dumped because their owners didn't take the time to try different litters or boxes, or to help the declaws deal with their situations.

So my thing is - if you're interested in a declawed cat, don't get one and declaw it - instead, check out your local shelters and rescue groups - almost every one in my area has declawed cats who are wonderful and are just waiting for homes!



Jen
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