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How do I get myself into these things??

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I'm taking in two kittens.

A coworker of mine came across them (he was in a rush and didn't say how) and cannot keep them. It's either this or, as he said, 'dumping them'. Whether that means shelter or street, I don't know, but I do know shelters are overburdened right now with kittens.

All I know is they are eight weeks old, males, and unvaccinated.

I CANNOT KEEP THEM! I have six cats already and cannot take in any more. I agreed to take them and find homes for them. Until then, they will be isolated from my group until and if I can get them vaccinated and health tested. I just moved and am very tight on the budget right now.

So, anyone in Western Washington want a kitten or two?
post #2 of 21
You get yourself into these things because you have a big kind heart and you can't bear to let anything suffer!

I would love a kitten or two but am a tad further west than Washington, sorry!

Good luck though - I'm sure everything will work out fine
post #3 of 21
You get into these things because you show more responsibility to our fellow creatures than other people do! And BLESS you for it! You are dealing with someone else's problem that they foisted onto your coworker. I hope that someone takes in those kittens for you. Are there any rescue groups that would help with the vaccines? Maybe the local news media would run a story? that always brings in response. I think that many people are good-hearted and would love to help, even if with a dollar or two, which really adds up. After all, kitten chow is expensive! I hope that you have good answers soon! Susan
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, the kitties are here, and its going to be even harder than I thought to find them homes. They're both black shorthairs, one solid, the other has a bit of white on his toes and chest, and white whiskers. I've talked to dozens of people already and they either don't want a kitten or they don't want a shorthair or they don't want black.

Jack, the solid black one seems okay, but Sparrow has goobery eyes. I cleaned him up a bit and he snuggled and purred. No sneezing that I heard, but I'm going to keep an eye on him the next couple of days. If he's got a respiratory infection he's going straight to the vet. Unless I find a home in the next few days, they're both getting their shots and such taken care of. Apparently, the reason the guy had to give them up was because their apartment manager doesn't allow MALE cats, only females. Roll Eyes

So seriously, anyone in the Western Washington area want a kitten or a pair thereof, lemme know!
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, bad news. Both kitties just saw the vet and both tested positive for FIV.

*sigh*
post #6 of 21
Oh I am sorry. That is bad news. What are your options now?
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Well, I'm going to keep them as long as I can and continue to find homes where they can either be the only kitties, or where there are other FIV positive cats. If not, I'll have to find a rescue that deals with FIV positive cats. I had a woman interested in the black one, but she's got another cat so the adoption is off now. I only hope I can find someone willing to take them.
post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravyn
Well, I'm going to keep them as long as I can and continue to find homes where they can either be the only kitties, or where there are other FIV positive cats. If not, I'll have to find a rescue that deals with FIV positive cats. I had a woman interested in the black one, but she's got another cat so the adoption is off now. I only hope I can find someone willing to take them.
How old are they? I believe FIV test can be misleading on young kittens because it could just indicate their mother was FIV positive. Maybe as they get older, they will test negative?
"There are complications in identifying FIV infection in young kittens based on antibody testing because kittens from FIV-infected dams may have obtained anti-FIV antibodies from their mother, via the colostrum. Therefore, they will test positive by a test for antibodies but may not be infected themselves. There is also a chance of kittens born to infected queens becoming actively infected from their mother. If screening is to be performed by antibody testing, this should be delayed until 20 weeks of age, by which time maternally derived antibodies may no longer be present. The kitten should have antibodies of its own if it is infected (i.e. a positive result will indicate true infection). It is suggested that kittens less than 20 weeks old which test FIV-positive should remain at the rescue facility and be re-tested after 20 weeks of age. An alternative is to test for the presence of virus using PCR or virus isolation from eight to 10 weeks of age."
http://www.fabcats.org/fiv_000.html
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
So, from what I understand about that, it's pretty much impossible to tell if a cat has FIV at eight weeks old, or if it is just leftover antibodies from the parent? The vet sounded pretty sure, but I've been screwed over by vets before, and I don't know this one very well.

I wonder if I can do the virus isolation test, and how much that would be. I can't in good conscious adopt these kitties out to homes (unless they are the only kitties) knowing they may have FIV, whether I'm sure or not, but nor do I want to keep them locked in the bathroom until they are twenty weeks and I can know for sure!!

Ugh! I'm going to call around to my regular vet and see what she has to say as well. Thanks for the info. I've had experience with Feline Leukemia and Panleukopenia but this is my first time dealing with FIV.
post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravyn
So, from what I understand about that, it's pretty much impossible to tell if a cat has FIV at eight weeks old, or if it is just leftover antibodies from the parent? The vet sounded pretty sure, but I've been screwed over by vets before, and I don't know this one very well.

I wonder if I can do the virus isolation test, and how much that would be. I can't in good conscious adopt these kitties out to homes (unless they are the only kitties) knowing they may have FIV, whether I'm sure or not, but nor do I want to keep them locked in the bathroom until they are twenty weeks and I can know for sure!!

Ugh! I'm going to call around to my regular vet and see what she has to say as well. Thanks for the info. I've had experience with Feline Leukemia and Panleukopenia but this is my first time dealing with FIV.
What test did the vet do? Sounds like if he did the antibody test, that all that is known at this point is their mother was FIV positive. It's not clear if they are themselves have FIV. If he did that virus isolation test, then they do have FIV. You should definetly ask what test did he do, and show him that info.
post #11 of 21
my vet says theres no point in testing for fiv any earlier than 16 weeks and by then you'd have a fair idea any way as the kittens will be quite sickly (she was talking about from birth, dont know if 'sickly' would apply to eight wk old kittens).

fiv is a lot harder to spread than most people realise, thats not to say there isnt dangers. the cats would have to be indoor only but unless prone to biting deeply or fighting would pose little risk to another cat.

this of course is widley debated but was my conclusion when researching fiv when i thoughy my cat might be fiv+
post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
She did an FeLV/FIV test, so I think that's just the antibody one. I'm not sure though, I'll call her tomorrow and ask. I still would not feel right letting the kitties go to a home with other kitties until I know for an absolute surety they do not have it. So unless I can find a home with no other kitties, I guess they're staying right here until they are six months old. I can isolate them from the other cats in my bedroom and bath. It's not the most ideal situation, but the shelters that deal with infected kitties are all booked up (all two of them) and they have no fosters available. And as I said, I would feel horrid giving them to someone with another cat only to end up passing it to that kitty.

I'm going to call the vet back tomorrow and see the exact test done. If it was the antibody test I will test them again in six months. That said, they'll probably end up just being my kitties unless they test positive at that time, in which case, I'll have to see what options are open to me. I'll probably be far too attached after six months old to let them go, and if finding a home for an eight week old black kitty is hard, a six month old black kitty is harder.

But we'll just see what we see. Right now, its one day at a time. They're spunky, Sparrow's eyes have cleared up, they've been wormed and flea-treated, they have toys and a soft bed, they love my dogs, and I'm pondering a name change for them. Their names just don't seem to fit to me.
post #13 of 21
Sounds like a plan. Hopefully they will test negative later on.
Although ones' eyes being infected probably not a good sign.
But maybe it's unrelated.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by KitEKats4Eva!
You get yourself into these things because you have a big kind heart and you can't bear to let anything suffer!
And thank goodness for people like you
post #15 of 21
your an amazing person - simple as that

I am so sorry to hear that they both might be FIV positive - poor little darlings - thankyou for all your doing for them

I will continue to check in for updates, and will send lots of love & vibes your way from across the ocean
post #16 of 21
I agree that until they are re-tested, you cannot know for sure. Also, most FIV+ cats are healthy a large majority of their life, although infections etc take longer to clear up, so there may be no signs. Here is a good link - it also says what the current stats for it being passed on in a multi-cat household.

http://www.catchat.org/fiv.html
post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 
Wow, I'm not liking this vet more and more, the more I read. She made it sound like they had it, no questions, that they could give it to the other cats through saliva and sharing a litter box, and that they would only live about five years and be sick the whole time. Now I'm seeing that's not the case at all!
post #18 of 21
That is so so not true, but unfortunately a lot of vets dont know the facts about FIV. Might be worth you printing info off for her. If you go to the link i gave you and go to the forums, you will see pics of cats with it (i know one is 7, dont know how old the eldest is), all looking very healthy, and another really good article.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ravyn
Wow, I'm not liking this vet more and more, the more I read. She made it sound like they had it, no questions, that they could give it to the other cats through saliva and sharing a litter box, and that they would only live about five years and be sick the whole time. Now I'm seeing that's not the case at all!
good on you for doing your own research into this... time to chat with another vet I think.
post #20 of 21
You'd think a vet would know the difference between fiv and feline leukemia.
post #21 of 21
Thread Starter 
You would think. I tried this new vet out because I just moved and she's closer to where I am, but it looks like I'm going to be driving the extra distance and sticking with my own wonderful tried and true vet...who actually KNOWS what she's talking about, and more...doesn't charge up the yin yang.

The two kitties are still doing wonderfully. They're taking their Clavimox fine and they're eating and bouncing and playing with each other and the toys I set up for them. I'm hoping more and more that they'll end up testing negative and be just peachy.

I talked to my coworker who originally gave them to me, and told him the situation. His first worry was if it was contagious to humans, which I reassured him it isn't. Then he was wanted to know if his new kitten would catch it (he just got a new FEMALE kitten since he couldn't have the boys), and I assured him that she was safe. Then he apologized right and left and thanked me for all I'm doing.

It's really not a problem. I mean, I couldn't imagine being in this situation and NOT doing what I'm doing. It just seems like only normal compassion and common sense. It's not any one's fault and they deserve not to be tossed just because they're boys or because they might be sick.

He told me he got them from 'free kittens' classified ad in the paper, so its likely their mother is one of these 'can't bother to get the cat fixed or keep it indoors' so that makes sense if she has FIV and gave antibodies to them. Which looks better for them in the long run, I'm hoping. I don't mean to sound accusatory or stereotypical, because I don't know the person or their situation. It could be this was a case of not spaying fast enough, or just not being educated. Things happen, I know. Our first cat got pregnant because she got out on us and we hadn't got her fixed fast enough, so I really can't judge too harshly. But this is the reason all my cats ARE and WILL BE fixed and are strictly INDOOR.

Anyway, I'm rambling. I'll keep everyone updated on how they're doing, and thanks for listening
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