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Who knows how to knit.

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I took a knitting class last night.
Talk about all thumbs.
I finished casting off my teeny little knitting last night and tried to cast on a new sample right away and couldn't do it!!!

ACKKKKKKKKKKKKKK.................................

I will try again during lunch!!!!!!!!! I don't know what problem my brain has learning this!!
post #2 of 20
lol I'm trying to learn but I can't keep my stitches regular. My "scarf" is getting wider and wider! Casting on took me a little bit to learn, but after I figured it out, it got easier and easier, and now its kind of fun to do. Best of luck when you try again!
post #3 of 20
My mother-in-law taught me this past winter. It took A LOT of PRACTICE before I really got the hang of it. She gave me a book full of how to make the different stitches that I refer to regularly. Don't give up! It's good that you've got someone to look over your shoulder while you're learning. Knitting is easy to do, BUT TRICKY TO LEARN!
post #4 of 20
You know, of all the things I have ever done, craftwise or artswise, only two "whupped my a**" as the Southern parlance goes---crocheting and knitting.

You have my admiration for even trying it!

Cindy
post #5 of 20
I haven't done any in years, but I used to love it. And yes, it takes some practice to get your head, and your fingers, around the casting on and casting off, and keeping the tension consistent, but once you get there, it's very satisfying and quite relaxing. Good on ya!!
post #6 of 20
I taught myself to knit using the internet and books last year. I've only complete three or four small projects. All you need is practice. Once the stitches become second nature to you, you will find your tension is mostly consistent. It sounds like you are already on the right track. Knitting small swatches until you get used to the stitch is definitely the way to go. Practice only the knit stitch first (also known as garter stitch). Then make a swatch practicing the purl stitch only. Once you're comfortable with both, make a new swatch practicing both. Knit one row, purl the next row, repeat. This is called Stockinette or Stocking stitch. You can make yourself a potholder set or a scarf. I recommend potholders first though, because if you find that your tension is inconsistent and your piece is getting wider or thinner then you have less to rip out in order to start again. Use larger needles, such as size 10 or 11, until you get used to holding them. Casting on and off just takes practice too. You'll get it. Trust me, I'm not very crafty, but if I can learn it anyone can. I recently took up crochet as well and I find that to be much easier than knitting. If you find that you really don't like knitting, crochet may be the way to go. Good luck.
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
Well I did print some other instructions off the internet and tried that casting on method. That seemed to work better after I went back and forth with two different sets of directions. The instructor said there was the english and continental methods and it the casting on way she showed me last night I can't get the hang of but the stuff I printed off this morning seems easier.
I'm left handed and I'm doing it right handed so it seems awkward for now.
I work on the casting on more tonite however.
post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GailC
I took a knitting class last night.
Talk about all thumbs.
I finished casting off my teeny little knitting last night and tried to cast on a new sample right away and couldn't do it!!!

ACKKKKKKKKKKKKKK.................................

I will try again during lunch!!!!!!!!! I don't know what problem my brain has learning this!!

Gail, are you still knitting? I'm looking for knitting buddies here, too!

Here's a link to a Web site that shows video clips on how to cast on, knit, etc. It was very helpful to me when I also learned recently (been knitting only since July, so I am very much a beginner, as well).

http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/basic_techniques/

You might also want to buy the book "Stitch 'n B***h" (yes, that is the actual name, don't want to write it here!). It is so helpful! I had to learn the knit and purl in person and from the video, but once you know how to do both, you can decide on a pattern, like stockinette stitch (knit 1 row, purl 1 row), seed stitch which looks very earthy and hippy-like, or 1 x 1 rib or 2 x 2 rib, etc. There are so many different patterns and it's so cool to be able to make your own creations!

Here's another link a friend sent me, if you are interested in making little animals and such. There is no end to the possibilities!!!

Pattern for cute knit bunny:
http://www.jesshutch.com/bunny.html

She also has a blog:
http://www.jesshutch.com/update.html (It appears that she has book coming out (at the end of the month) with all of the patterns to make these toys).

Lastly - Her Knitted Toys:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jesshutch/sets/492439/
post #9 of 20
People entering the wonderful world of knitting!

As you guys may or may not know, I LOVE knitting - I use in in my artwork (which you can see in a thread here somewhere!)

I learned to knit when I was about 4 or 5, so if I can give anyone any hints and tips, I'd be very pleased to!
post #10 of 20
Learning to knit as a left hander is really difficult if you're being taught by a right handed person or from instructions for right handed people. Some books have instructions specifically for left-handed people. You might find it helpful to look the pictures in the instructions reflected in a mirror.

I was lucky that my grandma who taught me how to knit was left-hyanded too and gave me a book with instructions for left handed people.

Good luck - I love knitting, but I haven't done any for such a long time now.
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by flisssweetpea
Learning to knit as a left hander is really difficult if you're being taught by a right handed person or from instructions for right handed people. Some books have instructions specifically for left-handed people. You might find it helpful to look the pictures in the instructions reflected in a mirror.

I was lucky that my grandma who taught me how to knit was left-hyanded too and gave me a book with instructions for left handed people.

Good luck - I love knitting, but I haven't done any for such a long time now.
How funny, my sister is left handed and she knits the right handed way (if that makes any sense! ) Although my sister and I do have some odd methods somethimes - makes my Mum laugh, as she taught us!!

OOh and while we're on the subject of knitting, I taught myself to crochet flat items (on Monday!) Everything I used to crochet turned into a ball!
post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 
Haven't picked the knitting up yet-too many fall projects yet to be completed around the house.
How do you keep the cats away from the yarn???
post #13 of 20
I just started! I'm not good, but it's very relaxing. My kitty will usually just try for one grab at the yarn, but I can usually make her stop. She loves to watch though. I think she's trying to figure out what the hell I'm doing with my hands and this yarn!
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by GailC
Haven't picked the knitting up yet-too many fall projects yet to be completed around the house.
How do you keep the cats away from the yarn???
I don't really stop them from playing with the wool! If they want to have a go, they can - they usually find something else after a while!

If you keep enough wool around you, loose from the ball, then the cats can play and you can still knit!
post #15 of 20
Like Sar, I've been knitting, crocheting, embroidering and sewing since I was a very very young girl. My mom even taught me how to make a mat (rug) out of feed bags and strips of old woolen clothing.

I admit I prefer crochet over knitting and love to embroider. I knit a turquoise short sleeve top using cotton yarn in a rather intricate pattern and won first prize and best of show at our local fall fair. I was pretty proud since I was up against some older and very talented ladies.
post #16 of 20
I do but I have not done it in awhile. My grandmother taught me before I went to school. She was a mega knitter - and quilter!

I lost a fav scarf recently tho - a certain tartan I really like - and have been unable to find it anywhere, well except for a Tartan place that wanted to sell it for a small fortune. So I may have to find a pattern and make one. Not sure I can knit a tartan though - that might involve sewing which would be easier to have my mom do, lol
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
Like Sar, I've been knitting, crocheting, embroidering and sewing since I was a very very young girl. My mom even taught me how to make a mat (rug) out of feed bags and strips of old woolen clothing.

I admit I prefer crochet over knitting and love to embroider. I knit a turquoise short sleeve top using cotton yarn in a rather intricate pattern and won first prize and best of show at our local fall fair. I was pretty proud since I was up against some older and very talented ladies.
Oooh, Rag Rugs?! I remember making them too! Selecting the different colours to make a picture! Have you seen how much they sell for in shops now though?! We should be making and selling them!

Well done for getting first, I knwo that the older lot have so much more experience - but younger, you can make more exciting things! (don't envy you knitting with the cotton yarn though! )

Was it you that mentioned you had a knitting machine at some point?! I have had mine serviced and it's working great now! Still hand knitting a more though!
post #18 of 20
I thought about trying to learn how to knit a while back, I love woollen jumpers and it would be wonderful to be able to make my own. I remember watching my Nan when I was little, and she made some great clothes (if a little old fashioned, but then she was nearly 70!)

Is it difficult to knit a jumper? How long would it take?
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purity
I thought about trying to learn how to knit a while back, I love woollen jumpers and it would be wonderful to be able to make my own. I remember watching my Nan when I was little, and she made some great clothes (if a little old fashioned, but then she was nearly 70!)

Is it difficult to knit a jumper? How long would it take?
Oh you should learn! It is easier to learn from a person than from a book, but it is possible!

It is quite difficult to knit a jumper as to have to create the shape (increasing and decreasing stitches) but there are simple patterns out there!

I would recommend that you buy this month's Simply Knitting magazine (i've only just discovered it), as it has a lovely simple jumper pattern and knitting instructions in the back to help you learn! It also has a key of the abreviations - which is helpful!
post #20 of 20
Keep practicing....if you want to do it you will be able to. I`d say not to worry about keeping the stitches too even right now....mainly you need to get the knack of it down first....the eveness and speed will come later. have fun!
Linda
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