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Declawing - story's from those who have. - Page 3

post #61 of 80
Growing up I never had a cat. I am 32 years old, and I adopted Ellie (female Himalayan 2 years old) about 5 1/2 months ago. After bringing Ellie home I did research on caring for cats, bought books etc. Then I heard of declawing read articles and saw some horrible pictures. IMO that is awful. After reading and seeing that, I went by Ellie and kissed her paws, and thought to myself I would never do that to you. Then about 3 weeks about I brought home a 12 week old Persian (male). Of course he is alot more energetic than Ellie. I have cat trees and scratch posts on every floor of the house for them, but Smokey loves to climb the couch. LOL Hopefully he out-grows that. But if he doesn't a couch doesn't last forever and can be replaced. I am happy hubby doesn't mind it. One of my friends just bought a kitten and told me she was going to have him declawed I asked her if she knew what it actually was and she had no idea, I explained the procedure and now she is against it and feels bad for not researching it first.

When I brought Ellie to the vet to be spayed they did ask me if I wanted her declawed for a reduced price. I was really mad!!! Said no and just kept quiet. I think a lot of people are not educated on what the procedure is and what can happen.
post #62 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
Well, to be fair, humans do have plastic surgery. The surgery is not beneficial to their health, only to their appearance, and there is a small risk that human will be harmed or even die from it.
Personally, I know people with declawed cats and the cats are fine. If it's a choice between a cat being declawed and owner having to get rid of the cat, then it's better, in my opinion, to declaw the cat. For instance, if the owner is renting and the lease ageement states the cat has to be declawed, I would suggest to the owner to declaw the cat rather than getting rid of the cat.
Humans choose plastic surgery. Cats do not choose to be declawed.
post #63 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat
Humans choose plastic surgery. Cats do not choose to be declawed.
Do cats choose to be spay or neutered?
post #64 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purity
Humans have a choice when they decide to have plastic surgery done to themselves, a cat has no choice whatsoever when it's owner decides it would be better off without its claws. Plastic surgery has a benefit to a human, declawing has no benefits to a cat.

It's amazing the cultural differences here. In the UK it's illegal and would be considered animal cruelty, whereas in other countries it's not only legal but encouraged
If the cat was given a choice, he/she might not want to be spayed or neutered either. What if the cat wants to go outside? Should I then allow it because it's cat choice? As owners, we decide what's best for our cat, not the other way around. Saying that can wouldn't chose it doesn't make much sense, considering we are the ones making all the major decisions for the cat.
post #65 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
Do cats choose to be spay or neutered?
I think being speutered is a surgery in which the benefits completely and totally outweigh the risks. Declawing saves our couches (maybe), while neutering keeps the population down. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but neutering inevitably has less of a lasting effect on the kitty and the kitty's way of life as a companio animal as far as I've ever read.
post #66 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
I think being speutered is a surgery in which the benefits completely and totally outweigh the risks. Declawing saves our couches (maybe), while neutering keeps the population down. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but neutering inevitably has less of a lasting effect on the kitty and the kitty's way of life as a companio animal as far as I've ever read.
Still, cat isn't the one deciding to do it. If he/she was asked, he/she might prefer not to be spayed or neutered, even if there are health risks. As an owner, I make that choice.
Arguing that cat didn't choose something doesn't make much sense in that context.
post #67 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by lionessrampant
I think being speutered is a surgery in which the benefits completely and totally outweigh the risks. Declawing saves our couches (maybe), while neutering keeps the population down. Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but neutering inevitably has less of a lasting effect on the kitty and the kitty's way of life as a companio animal as far as I've ever read.
EXACTLY!!!
post #68 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
If the cat was given a choice, he/she might not want to be spayed or neutered either. What if the cat wants to go outside? Should I then allow it because it's cat choice? As owners, we decide what's best for our cat, not the other way around. Saying that can wouldn't chose it doesn't make much sense, considering we are the ones making all the major decisions for the cat.
An owner can chose to keep their cat inside, this reduces the chances of the cat getting hit by a car, getting killed by a wild animal, getting hurt by non-cat loving people, getting FIV, getting leukemia, getting fleas and ticks. I think we can agree that the owner has the cats best interests at heart?

An owner can spay/neuter their cat, this reduces the chance of the cat mating (if an outside cat) and contracting FIV or having a difficult kitten birth which leads to death. if the cat is inside only then a spay/neuter will prevent the cat from going into heat and spending a large proprtion of it's life miserable inside, trying to get out. Spaying also reduces the risk of ovarian cancer in females. Again, I think we can agree this course of action is best for the animal.

An owner can decide to declaw a cat. How is this in the cats best interest? What does the cat gain from this procedure?
post #69 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purity
An owner can chose to keep their cat inside, this reduces the chances of the cat getting hit by a car, getting killed by a wild animal, getting hurt by non-cat loving people, getting FIV, getting leukemia, getting fleas and ticks. I think we can agree that the owner has the cats best interests at heart?

An owner can spay/neuter their cat, this reduces the chance of the cat mating (if an outside cat) and contracting FIV or having a difficult kitten birth which leads to death. if the cat is inside only then a spay/neuter will prevent the cat from going into heat and spending a large proprtion of it's life miserable inside, trying to get out. Spaying also reduces the risk of ovarian cancer in females. Again, I think we can agree this course of action is best for the animal.

An owner can decide to declaw a cat. How is this in the cats best interest? What does the cat gain from this procedure?
I don't think there are any benefits to declawing for the cat.
But I don't think the argument that a cat can not consent to declawing is valid.
After all, cat can not consent to spay and neuter either. And to many other things.
We decide for the cat, not the other way around.
post #70 of 80
I preface this with the fact that my three have their claws, and Tizi had all her claws and that was fine!


I know that not everyone has had the option that should have been available about declawing-and in some cases it is medically neccesary to have at least a partial declaw. Molly's littermate Harley is a polydactly with fused claws on one paw- they can't be retracted and can puncture her pad if not kept a close eye on.. this would be a case where perhaps the problem claws should be removed. i love polydactyls but that's something that requires medical attention in that case.

Also, We have thought about getting Molly declawed because she has severe agression issues that are finnicky at best. also, she always leaves her claws somewhat extended. We haven't yet decided to , and probably will not because we don't want to cause her so much pain but it has been an issue that has been addressed after thinking very seriously about it.

I can see where the choices must be made.

This does not however mean that I condone it. If one is going to be forced into declawing thier cat, they need to be properly educated and need to select a vet that is trustworthy to do it. Laser surgeries have come a long way and while i wish it weren't neccesary, sometimes to save the cats life, it is neccesary (IE: having to give it up where it will probably be put to sleep or declawed anyway.)
post #71 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
Still, cat isn't the one deciding to do it. If he/she was asked, he/she might prefer not to be spayed or neutered, even if there are health risks. As an owner, I make that choice.
Arguing that cat didn't choose something doesn't make much sense in that context.
Neither does comparing declawing to plastic surgery.
post #72 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat
Neither does comparing declawing to plastic surgery.
I compared them in terms that both are un-necessary in most cases.
post #73 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by ugaimes
I did not forsee ever having to move back in with my mother when I adopted Eponine. Life doesn't always work out the way we want. To my mother, the furniture was more important than my cat's claws. I did not agree with her whatsoever, but at the time I honestly didn't have much of a choice and I did the best I can before putting Eponine through that.
I am just seeing this thread now...But it took courage to say all that and I am not one to pass judgement. You did what you thought was best.
When my sister was moving out and couldn't take her two cats with her, a family friend offered to take them into her wonderful loving home where they would be doted upon. The only catch was she was adamant that they be declawed. My sister said "no way" at first.

I explained to her that it was her the one being selfish and not finding a way to move out and take her cats with her.. The next stop is to send them to the Humane society! At first she said she would rather do that...and I emphasized again how selfish she was being. The kits may have to be declawed but you are lucky you found someone to take them into a loving (if misinformed) home rather than face certain death...
She finally saw things my way and the lady decided not to go through with the declaw in the end!! You just have to do what is best for the cats in bad situations sometimes.
post #74 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
I compared them in terms that both are un-necessary in most cases.
Well, then, I agree with you!
post #75 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
I don't think there are any benefits to declawing for the cat.
But I don't think the argument that a cat can not consent to declawing is valid.
After all, cat can not consent to spay and neuter either. And to many other things.
We decide for the cat, not the other way around.
The argument that a cat can not decide whether or not to have surgery is a perfectly valid rebuttal against your comment that both humans and animals face dangers in surgery. Humans have a choice to put themselves at risk for a non-urgent unnecessary operation. An animal has no choice, it is our responsibility as owners to ensure they are not put under unnecessary stress and do not suffer unnecessary pain.

A child can not consent to an operation either, does this mean that anything the parents decide to do to it is acceptable?
post #76 of 80
Ugaimes, although I have never declawed a cat, I probably would have done the same thing you did, if I had been in your situation. From what I can see, you didn't have a choice. I'm glad there were no bad side effects or physical problems from the declawing.Your mother gave you an ultimatum, so what choice did you have?

My sister declawed her cats, and even though I've tried to explain how bad it can be, she simply doesn't believe me. The Vet told her it was OK, and she believes him.

I've also done things in the past that TCS doesn't agree with, and it was BEFORE I educated on things here on TCS. I bought Shane from a BYB. I didn't see anything wrong with that at the time, but now I understand not to support BYB. I'm sure we all have done things in our pasts.

Like I said, if I were living with my mother and she demanded that I get rid of my gets or declaw them, I'd probably declaw them, if I couldn't afford to move out of my mothers house.
post #77 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by Purity
The argument that a cat can not decide whether or not to have surgery is a perfectly valid rebuttal against your comment that both humans and animals face dangers in surgery. Humans have a choice to put themselves at risk for a non-urgent unnecessary operation. An animal has no choice, it is our responsibility as owners to ensure they are not put under unnecessary stress and do not suffer unnecessary pain.

A child can not consent to an operation either, does this mean that anything the parents decide to do to it is acceptable?
To which I already pointed out that if we waited for cat to decide wheter or not to have surgery, we couldn't spay or neuter either. Yes, those surgeries have health benefits, but if we could actually ask the cats, who is to say whether they would prefer to be un-spayed and un-neutered despite having health risks? After all, it's only natural for cats to breed. Spay or neuter also have risks as well, and some cats had even died from it.
Any surgery has risks, even plastic surgery in humans can lead to death in rare cases. Cat can not decide whether to have surgery or not. So, we have to decide for them.
post #78 of 80
I feel really bad for Charlotte because she already had been 4-paw declawed when I adopted her. She has absolutely no way to protect herself other than with her teeth. She's very cautious and observant of where she's about to leap or walk.

I only realized after I adopted Izzie how limited Charlotte is. Izzie can climb the cat tree like a squirrel (or like a cat should) and really has few fears of falling. When I adopted Izzie, a lot of people said "I bet you can't wait to get her declawed. She's gonna tear up your furniture." When I told them I had no plans to declaw, they reacted like I was completely nuts!! My boyfriend thought I was too, especially when I wanted to buy a scratching post and told hm I was going to trim Izzie's claws. I worked with Izzie and she LOVES her scratching post!! I swear she scratches it every time she passes it.

I totally do not regret my decision to not declaw Izzie. My sister had her two kittens declawed and I did try to educate her about it. However, she was more worried about her furniture and I think she was too lazy to teach the kittens how to use the scratching post.
post #79 of 80
I think what angers me is the fact that so many vets have a vested interest in declawing. I got my first cat, Petunia, declawed 16 years ago because I just thought that was the thing to do. I probably got the spay and declaw package. Fortunately, I did not have serious problems though I wonder if her shyness was compounded by it. After I started trimming the nails of my husband's cat, I realized how simple it was and how it limited the damage.

People should be fully informed about what the surgery entails - both during and after; what behavior changes could happen; training in alternatives (such as how to trim the nails, apply soft-paws, create a cat-friendly environment). But this isn't as lucrative.

Also - these cats must strictly be kept indoors. My MIL irritated me by getting her cat declawed and letting it outside. A coyote got the poor thing who couldn't climb a tree. So far we've succeeded in keeping the replacement with claws.
post #80 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by katachtig
I think what angers me is the fact that so many vets have a vested interest in declawing. I got my first cat, Petunia, declawed 16 years ago because I just thought that was the thing to do. I probably got the spay and declaw package. Fortunately, I did not have serious problems though I wonder if her shyness was compounded by it. After I started trimming the nails of my husband's cat, I realized how simple it was and how it limited the damage.

People should be fully informed about what the surgery entails - both during and after; what behavior changes could happen; training in alternatives (such as how to trim the nails, apply soft-paws, create a cat-friendly environment). But this isn't as lucrative.

Also - these cats must strictly be kept indoors. My MIL irritated me by getting her cat declawed and letting it outside. A coyote got the poor thing who couldn't climb a tree. So far we've succeeded in keeping the replacement with claws.
I was asked numerous times by them wether I would want the declaw included in spay-neuter combo. Never once did the vet mentioned any complications with declaw. I declined. Unfortunately, a lot of vets are only interested in money and not so much in the welfare of the animals. People who aren't very knowledgeble in cat care might obviously decide that it's the right thing to do, since the vet is the one recommending it.
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