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White cats with blue eyes - deaf?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hi there,
I have a question about white cats with blue eyes. I know they have a 60-80% chance of being born deaf - but if they are not deaf when born, do they have the same chance of BECOMING deaf later in life?

thank you!
post #2 of 26
I'm not sure of the anwser. I also have heard about blue-eyed white cats being deaf. I'd like to know the anwser to that. I think if they're not born deaf, they will not become deaf, but I'm not sure.
post #3 of 26
I don't think so but I will look into it. Your ? got me to wondering about it.
Off hand I'd say not but I just am not sure.
post #4 of 26
I wouldnt think so - my white cat with blue eyes is deaf but I believe he was born that way.
post #5 of 26
Cirrus is about two years old, has white fur and blue eyes, and has perfect hearing. My guess would be that if a cat is white w/blue eyes, that the genetic defect that causes deafness would be present from the start and not develop later in life. That's just a guess, however.
post #6 of 26
Sampson has one blue and one green eye. He is deaf, the vet said that usually they have a 50/50 chance of being deaf with two different colored eyes. I have never heard of a white cat with blue eyes going deaf later in life though.
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by snosrap5
Sampson has one blue and one green eye. He is deaf, the vet said that usually they have a 50/50 chance of being deaf with two different colored eyes. I have never heard of a white cat with blue eyes going deaf later in life though.
I know that in an odd-eyed white cat, the cat is deaf on the blue-eyed side. Also, if the cat is not born deaf, they have a very small chance of becoming deaf--unless they have an accident, or they grow deaf from old age.
That's my only knowledge on the deaf white blue eyed cat scenario!
post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by OllyExtra05
I know that in an odd-eyed white cat, the cat is deaf on the blue-eyed side. Also, if the cat is not born deaf, they have a very small chance of becoming deaf--unless they have an accident, or they grow deaf from old age.
That's my only knowledge on the deaf white blue eyed cat scenario!

Sampson is deaf in both ears. He sleeps through everything and anything.
His foster mom said that they had him tested. I dont know what that means but even our vet said he was deaf. I know when he is lonely or looking to snuggle he will walk through the house crying until someone picks him up or his sister goes and gets him.
post #9 of 26
I'm pretty sure a white, blue-eyed cat that is not deaf from birth has only as much chance of becoming deaf as any other cat. Also, a cat could be deaf from birth for reasons other than the white coat/blue eye combo.

There is more than one gene that causes white coats/blue eyes, and only that particular gene also causes deafness. So, it's congenital.
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
purrrrfect - thank you all so much! I did a search of my own in google, but will do an extensive search later, but I have a feeling that if they are not born deaf, they have the same chance as other cats of becoming deaf later in life.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by evnshawn
I'm pretty sure a white, blue-eyed cat that is not deaf from birth has only as much chance of becoming deaf as any other cat. Also, a cat could be deaf from birth for reasons other than the white coat/blue eye combo.

There is more than one gene that causes white coats/blue eyes, and only that particular gene also causes deafness. So, it's congenital.
Also... I've heard that if kitty has a dark smudge of the top of it's head, between it's ears, it will not be afflicted by deafness. Same with odd-eyed white cats.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by journey
Hi there,
I have a question about white cats with blue eyes. I know they have a 60-80% chance of being born deaf - but if they are not deaf when born, do they have the same chance of BECOMING deaf later in life?

thank you!
If the cat isn't born deaf, then he/she won't become deaf later in life. Why are you asking? Are you getting one of those white blue eyed beuaties?
post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
If the cat isn't born deaf, then he/she won't become deaf later in life. Why are you asking? Are you getting one of those white blue eyed beuaties?
yeah - i'm going to meet 2 sisters this weekend, and i don't think they are deaf. the foster mom didn't say they were, and she's pretty caring and honest, so we shall see!
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by journey
yeah - i'm going to meet 2 sisters this weekend, and i don't think they are deaf. the foster mom didn't say they were, and she's pretty caring and honest, so we shall see!
If they are not deaf already, then they should be just fine.
They are white with blue eyes? How cute is that?
Congrats!
Here is a link to an article on why some white cats with blue eyes are deaf.
"It is evident from those studies that blue eyed whites exhibit a higher incidence of deafness than do orange/green eyed whites or non-white cats! But not all blue eyed whites are deaf and here's why:-

There is a known link between white coat color, blue eyes and deafness - but since the coat and eye color can be caused by different genes it means that only some blue eyed whites are deaf. There is a gene/gene complex which causes white coat, blue eyes and deafness, but not all cats get their white coat and blue eyes from that particular gene, so not all white cats will be deaf. "
http://www.messybeast.com/whitecat.htm
post #15 of 26
I have two odd-eyed white American shorthairs, and one is not deaf, and the other is. CJ isn't deaf, and when she was a kitten, she had a dark smudge in between her ears, and she can hear. Annie is deaf, had now dark mark. But she has a cerebular vestibular disease, which is what they call an "inner ear" infection, and I don't know if that would have anything to do with it. I've wondered that. I don't think it does, but I really don't know.

But, seriously, if I didn't tell you Annie was deaf, you wouldn't really know.
post #16 of 26
Ummm...sorry to some people but cats can develop deafness at any stage of their life for a variety of reasons. Just like humans. However a Blue Eyed White cat born with perfect hearing has the same chance of developing deafness later on in life as a Black copper eyed cat.
post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Ummm...sorry to some people but cats can develop deafness at any stage of their life for a variety of reasons. Just like humans. However a Blue Eyed White cat born with perfect hearing has the same chance of developing deafness later on in life as a Black copper eyed cat.
Yeah, any cat can, but I think what they were meaning is that they won't have increased chances just because they are blue eyed.
post #18 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJandBilly
Yeah, any cat can, but I think what they were meaning is that they won't have increased chances just because they are blue eyed.
yes, that's exactly what I was asking....
post #19 of 26
Well that's what I said.

If you read my second sentance.
post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJandBilly
I have two odd-eyed white American shorthairs, and one is not deaf, and the other is. CJ isn't deaf, and when she was a kitten, she had a dark smudge in between her ears, and she can hear. Annie is deaf, had now dark mark. But she has a cerebular vestibular disease, which is what they call an "inner ear" infection, and I don't know if that would have anything to do with it. I've wondered that. I don't think it does, but I really don't know.

But, seriously, if I didn't tell you Annie was deaf, you wouldn't really know.
Cassie, what does now dark mark mean???
post #21 of 26
CJ had (it eventually goes away) what looked like a black grease smudge, and I read in a book that that means a blue eyed or odd eyed white cat will not be afflicted by the deafness if they have a dark colored, as in black, smudge on their head.
post #22 of 26
My one Aunt is almost completely deaf and wanted to get a cat that shared the non-hearing lifestyle... she ended up adopting a little pure white, blue-eyed baby whom she named Princess Maple. After doing research, she found that white, blue-eyed cats are in fact more likely to be deaf at birth, but all aren't necessarily deaf. Also, if the cat is not born deaf, it has just as much chance as any other cat to become deaf (usually due to old age). Recently, my aunt kitty-sat her friend's 3 pure white cats: Mama, who is only paritially deaf, one of her babies who is fully deaf and another non-related pure white cat that was fully hearing. Princess Maple responds to vibrations of people walking or pounding the floor to get her attention ... also, my Aunt has taught her sign language for things like "cookie" and "dinner"... I think it's great when people decide to adopt non-hearing cats and take the extra time with them that they need instead of looking at it as a burden... good for you!
post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BuzbyJLC10
my Aunt has taught her sign language for things like "cookie" and "dinner"... I

awwww! cute!
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJandBilly
CJ had (it eventually goes away) what looked like a black grease smudge, and I read in a book that that means a blue eyed or odd eyed white cat will not be afflicted by the deafness if they have a dark colored, as in black, smudge on their head.
I'm a breeder of Orange eyed, Blue Eyed & Copper Eyed White Persians & Exotics.

It is called a Genetic Spot. A cat can be deaf that has had one. It doesn't mean that the cat wont be affected by deafness but shows what colour the cat is masking.
post #25 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
I'm a breeder of Orange eyed, Blue Eyed & Copper Eyed White Persians & Exotics.

It is called a Genetic Spot. A cat can be deaf that has had one. It doesn't mean that the cat wont be affected by deafness but shows what colour the cat is masking.
Okie dokie. Thanks for the info!
post #26 of 26
We used to have a non-deaf odd-eyed white. I think I understand that she was actually a white cat (dominant white, blue eyed) with white spots (which accounts for the green/gold eye.)

Right now I have a white kitten that is odd-eyed. He has 7 siblings, who have all gone to homes now, and I am wondering about him a little. When he finds himself alone he makes a strange meowing sound. Like he doesn't know how to find his mom without calling her to him?

Oh, and my vet said (and I had never heard this before) that blue eyed boys had more chance of being deaf. Not sure where he got that! How do you test for deafness? I've tried noises behind him but I think I give myself away somehow.
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