TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Should this native american mom be able to let "white" people adopt her child??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Should this native american mom be able to let "white" people adopt her child??

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...option_dispute
I agree with her tribe that the child needs to be adopted by someone active in the tribe. Usually I agree that people should be able to adopt who ever they want, but I disagree this time. Native americans need to be taught the culture we ( USA) have destroyed. I don't think that this tribe should lose another possible member. It doesn't matter that the father is white, because many native americans are mixed with other races and still native americans. I hope the tribe can do something to keep hime part of the family.
post #2 of 28
I think a good, stable home for the child should be the main priority over race issues
post #3 of 28
It's definitely important for this child to know where he came from and be exposed to his Native American heritage if he so chooses. But, the welfare of the child and the mother's wishes should be a priority. There's also a strong possibility that his adoptive parents, regardless of their race, will want him to know about Native American culture and will make an effort to ensure this happens.
post #4 of 28
he's as equal white as he is native american and if his adoption wasnt an issue the mother expressed doubts that he would have even been accepted or welcomed into the tribe in the first place.

as long as he is provided for he has his whole adult life to decide whether or not he wants to be part of this tribe.
post #5 of 28
Should all Chinese babies only be adopted by Chinese parents? Or any other country/culture?

The concern should be the welfare of the child. Nothing more. His culture will be there his whole life, and as long as it isn't hidden from him where he came from culturally, it shouldn't be an issue.
post #6 of 28
My Native American sister was adopted into our white home.
She was loved as much as the rest of us, and had the same benefits as the rest of us.
She was brought up able to embrace her own culture, in fact, she was encouraged to do so, and the rest of us embraced her culture as well.

Generally, agengies try to adopt babies/kids into homes that share their own culture, but it's not always possible.
To restrict adoptions would only harm the child.
My sister was a toddler when she joined our family.


addendum;
She is right, the child will likely have a better future outside of the tribe.
Having spent a great deal of time on various plains states reservations, I can't even begin to describe how sad a state most are, and how poverty stricken.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick_kitten
I think a good, stable home for the child should be the main priority over race issues

post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick_kitten
I think a good, stable home for the child should be the main priority over race issues
post #9 of 28
I think whom ever can give the child the best life possible should be able to adopt that child. The mother must find a caring and loving family, regardless of net worth.
post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick_kitten
I think a good, stable home for the child should be the main priority over race issues

I agree!!
post #11 of 28
This mother should be commended for trying to provide the best life possible for her child. That is HER baby and it should be HER decision.

BTW: where is the father, in all of this? Does he have any input?
post #12 of 28
I agree that a good home should be the first priority
post #13 of 28
I don't understand.. the article said his father was white and it is "unlikely the child will ever be formally enrolled in the tribe". But then it also said: Larry Lassley, executive director of the tribe, said the tribe has the authority under the Indian Child Welfare Act to intervene in adoption cases involving children of tribal members.

But if he's not a member now and will unlikely become one then why are they involved in this matter? It should be the mother's decision.

post #14 of 28
It still makes me wonder why people dont have protection.
post #15 of 28
If a good home can be provided within the tribe I think that would be a great thing. (but not at the expense of his welfare) - Its a shame to lose our individuality.
post #16 of 28
She should be able to adopt him to a couple she wants to adopt him out to.
Especially considering the tribe won't even enroll him into itself because his father was white.
I presume there is a reason this woman thinks a white couple will be able to give him a better life.
post #17 of 28
I know that for many many years in Canada, that the law allowed Native men to marry white women and keep their status in the tribe.
However, if a native woman married a white man, she was ex-communicated and left without any status or privileges.
She was often driven out of the community and harrassed as well.
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by catlover7731
http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=stor...option_dispute
I agree with her tribe that the child needs to be adopted by someone active in the tribe. Usually I agree that people should be able to adopt who ever they want, but I disagree this time. Native americans need to be taught the culture we ( USA) have destroyed. I don't think that this tribe should lose another possible member. It doesn't matter that the father is white, because many native americans are mixed with other races and still native americans. I hope the tribe can do something to keep hime part of the family.
I agree with you for the most part but most native americans live in bad conditions on the reservations. If a white person adopts the child, then the child could have a better life and still be exposed to his native american roots.
post #19 of 28
It appears from the article that the mother is the one who claims that the baby won't be allowed into the tribe. Usu. the tribes let in persons up to 1/8% Indian onto their rolls. And as far as assuming that the baby will grow up poor, please note that the tribe operates a lucrative casino. Also of interest is the fact that the mother prefers white men, to people of her own race; there may be other reasons that the tribal council has concerns with her decision. After all, keeping the baby in the tribe means less resources, land grants, etc. for the rest of them. I just hope & pray that the tribal council uses wisdom; I am sure there is much information, whether good or bad, that the tribe has which wasn't presented in the article.
post #20 of 28
The Pocatello Tribe of Idaho runs lucrative casinos as well, but the tribe as a whole is in poverty.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arlyn
My Native American sister was adopted into our white home.
She was loved as much as the rest of us, and had the same benefits as the rest of us.
She was brought up able to embrace her own culture, in fact, she was encouraged to do so, and the rest of us embraced her culture as well.

Generally, agengies try to adopt babies/kids into homes that share their own culture, but it's not always possible.
To restrict adoptions would only harm the child.
My sister was a toddler when she joined our family.


addendum;
She is right, the child will likely have a better future outside of the tribe.
Having spent a great deal of time on various plains states reservations, I can't even begin to describe how sad a state most are, and how poverty stricken.


Totally agree!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme
It appears from the article that the mother is the one who claims that the baby won't be allowed into the tribe. Usu. the tribes let in persons up to 1/8% Indian onto their rolls. And as far as assuming that the baby will grow up poor, please note that the tribe operates a lucrative casino. Also of interest is the fact that the mother prefers white men, to people of her own race; there may be other reasons that the tribal council has concerns with her decision. After all, keeping the baby in the tribe means less resources, land grants, etc. for the rest of them. I just hope & pray that the tribal council uses wisdom; I am sure there is much information, whether good or bad, that the tribe has which wasn't presented in the article.
It seems she has less rights as an individual than any of us. Any of us could give up a child for adoption, if we so wanted. And because she is indian, she can not. Is that even fair?
post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by elizwithcat
It seems she has less rights as an individual than any of us. Any of us could give up a child for adoption, if we so wanted. And because she is indian, she can not. Is that even fair?
thats such a good point.

she obviously has her own reasons and issues with the tribe, why cant we trust her judgement?

has the world become so pc that a childs safety is less important than appeasing minority groups.
post #24 of 28
My husband handles conservatorships, wardship petitions, etc. for the county, and far too often there are family problems, not necessarily those of the grandparents & aunts & uncles, that cloud the reasoning of a parent. This is true, even in divorces, where spite & revenge becomes the motivating factor, not what's truly in the best interest of the children. Our area is a poor area for the locals, and our casino in Bishop has made a tremendous positive financial imipact, both for Indians and some non-Indian. The Pala, San Miguel, and Pechanga tribes are doing incredibly well, and give back to the community, not just the tribe, by donating computers to public schools, funding youth events, and even contributing to the public school's meal program, so that the children in some poor districts can have fresh salad with their meal. I'm just saying that we need to reserve judgment because we don't know the facts. In fact, think about it - she got pregnant by a man who didn't stick around, she alienates herself from her family & community - does that sound like someone you'd allow to decide where a cat should be adopted out to , much less a child?
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme
My husband handles conservatorships, wardship petitions, etc. for the county, and far too often there are family problems, not necessarily those of the grandparents & aunts & uncles, that cloud the reasoning of a parent. This is true, even in divorces, where spite & revenge becomes the motivating factor, not what's truly in the best interest of the children. Our area is a poor area for the locals, and our casino in Bishop has made a tremendous positive financial imipact, both for Indians and some non-Indian. The Pala, San Miguel, and Pechanga tribes are doing incredibly well, and give back to the community, not just the tribe, by donating computers to public schools, funding youth events, and even contributing to the public school's meal program, so that the children in some poor districts can have fresh salad with their meal. I'm just saying that we need to reserve judgment because we don't know the facts. In fact, think about it - she got pregnant by a man who didn't stick around, she alienates herself from her family & community - does that sound like someone you'd allow to decide where a cat should be adopted out to , much less a child?
I think there are circumstances where the mother in question may not be the best person to decide where the child is adopted out to (and that goes for people of all backgrounds and cultures). However, if there is to be interference in the mother's choice, I think there needs to be an impartial body that decides that and it needs to be for good reasons (e.g. the mother is mentally unstable, etc). Hi, by the way! I'm a Bishop gal myself, though now my husband and I just visit at the Mom and Dad Bed and Breakfast! And you're right, despite some of the grumbling and hostility floating about when that Casino was being proposed, it has had a positive financial impact on both the native american community and the community as a whole.
post #26 of 28
Obi, this is too cool! What a small world, this is! I graduated Round Valley School in '70 and B.U.H.S. in '74, my girls graduated from Mammoth High in '95 & '99. Maybe some of us went to school with you. My dad worked for CalTrans, and retired from being Senior Administrator in '80 - he ran the paving crew that paved Tioga Pass, and he planned Coso Junction Rest Area - took him years to get that rest area approved (his promotion, and then his approval signature!! ) My husband has been a contract public defender for Mono County for about 15 years. I'm glad that you've been able to see some of the positive effects from the casino (I've only been there maybe 3 times, the last time to use their ATM machine) but that's cuz I don't gamble and I hate cigarette smoke.
post #27 of 28
By the way, I copied this from the Sac&Fox (they preferred to be called Meskwaki) Consitution, regarding enrolling the baby in the tribe:
ARTICLE 1 - MEMBERSHIP OF TRIBE
The membership of the Sac and Fox Nation shall consist of the following:

SECTION 1.All enrolled persons whose names appear on the official Tribal Roll as of the date of the ratification of this constitution.

SECTION 2.All persons of one-fourth (1/4) or more degree of total combined Sac and Fox Indian blood at least one of whose parents is a member of the Sac and Fox Nation.
post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by catsknowme
My husband handles conservatorships, wardship petitions, etc. for the county, and far too often there are family problems, not necessarily those of the grandparents & aunts & uncles, that cloud the reasoning of a parent. This is true, even in divorces, where spite & revenge becomes the motivating factor, not what's truly in the best interest of the children. Our area is a poor area for the locals, and our casino in Bishop has made a tremendous positive financial imipact, both for Indians and some non-Indian. The Pala, San Miguel, and Pechanga tribes are doing incredibly well, and give back to the community, not just the tribe, by donating computers to public schools, funding youth events, and even contributing to the public school's meal program, so that the children in some poor districts can have fresh salad with their meal. I'm just saying that we need to reserve judgment because we don't know the facts. In fact, think about it - she got pregnant by a man who didn't stick around, she alienates herself from her family & community - does that sound like someone you'd allow to decide where a cat should be adopted out to , much less a child?
If a caucasian woman got pregnant, and the man had run off, would you even suggest the same thing? Would you suggest that a group of people in her community decided who the child should be adopted out to, instead of the mother and against her wishes? Many women get pregnant, for whatever reason don't or can't raise the child themselves, and nobody suggest they can not decide who their child should be adopted out to.
It's because this woman is native american, we are even having this discussion. Furthemore, just because this woman's boyfreind had run off-you don't know anything else about her character to suggest she is not rational or that she is not trying to do what's best for her child.
I don't understand why she has less rights than any of us just because she is a native american.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: IMO: In My Opinion
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › IMO: In My Opinion › Should this native american mom be able to let "white" people adopt her child??