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Independence day in the USA, is it really taken seriously?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Do any of us americans take the 4th seriously? Most people see it as a day to BBQ and shoot fireworks. Do you take it seriously?
I grew up in a family where the 4th of July was about going to the beach and having fun, not until I was older did I understand its importance. What do you do to stress it's importance?
post #2 of 18
I remember and honor it by re-affirming a silent promise that I will keep the faith with those whose blood has poured in defense of our flag and country and do my part to see that their supreme sacrifice was not in vain, and stand ready myself to do the same.

When I joined the military service in 1949 I took a vow to defend my country, and I don't recall there being a time limit on the vow.

The above lines are deadly serious, and the below thoughts are on a lighter note . . .

I may even invite a Limey to a cook-out.

Not that I'm all that fond of them, just that I like them where I can watch them.

The sun never sets on the British empire, and it has been suggested that perhaps God doesn't trust all Englishmen in the dark at the same time.

Leonard
post #3 of 18
Leonard, I hope that was a joke! And you should hear what people over here say about 'Glupi Stranki' (stupid foreigners) by whom they almost always means Americans!
post #4 of 18
Please don't tar us all with the same brush Leonard!!
post #5 of 18
On the original topic, I certainly do take it seriously. Sure, we'll go and do something "traditional" (i.e. cookout or fireworks), but the importance of this as America's birthday, for lack of a better term, is definetly not lost on me. This is a grand country, for all of its ups and downs and turmoil since its inception, and I'm very proud of Her. And I'm very proud to be a part of Her.
post #6 of 18
I've always thought people took it quite seriously, but then I'm from Philly, which gets lots of tourists interested in seeing where the nation was "born".
post #7 of 18
Oh I take it seriously, I mean I think it's a neato holiday. Love or hate the US, the declaration of Independence is an amazing event.
post #8 of 18
I take it very seriously. and I take this day to remind myself and those I come in contact with that..freedom did not come free. and freedom will not be something we can keep for free..Bless our troops than and now. we have made it possible to be free.

But that being said. I do not see anything wrong with cookouts..and fireworks. Its a celebration! And I sure would like fireworks to celebrate my bday!

And i have nothing wrong with "limeys" as you said lenoard. My dad married a brit..and heck this happened sometime ago. i think we can all get along now
post #9 of 18
I hang out my flag.
post #10 of 18
We take it very seriously. My son is now 5 and we had a talk with him yesterday about what the "4th of July" really means. He recited the entire Pledge and then we explained why we say that. Until this year, he has always seen it as a day to do fireworks but from now on, he will understand it's importance.

Each year I will gradually tell him more about the day and how our country fought for our freedom. We've already taught him to respect our soldiers and when he sees one in uniform, he salutes them. His great-grandfather was in WWII and his grandfather was in Nam. We just want him to realize that it's an honor to serve our country and an honor to live in the USA.
post #11 of 18
I've always know what the 4th of July was about and have taken it seriously. Even more so now that I've joined an Soldier's Angels (an organization that supports deployed troops) and "adopted" several troops serving in the middle east. After hearing about everything they have to deal with it makes me thankful for what we take for granted.
post #12 of 18
Jenny, et al, as I said, the below thoughts are in a lighter vein, or, yes, I was joking. I have much respect for our (and my) friends in the UK.

Good friends are a bit thin on the ground these days, so thank you for being our (my) friend.

Leonard
post #13 of 18
I take the 4th both seriously and lightly. It does have great meaning, honoring those soldiers and great people who went before, to create the land of the free and the brave. But it is also a day to spend enjoying those freedoms with friends and family.

It is thunderstorming here, so I can't hang the flag, but if its dry again tomorrow I will hang it then.
post #14 of 18
I honestly never was very into the flag waving that so many americans were into. Then my best friend when to iraq. I started dating someone who had just gotten out of the army (broken up now). When I watched the news everyday hoping to see a glimpse of my friend in the background, when I read the paper hoping not to see his name, that is when it all started to sink in. I went to washington DC and saw the wall with all the names on it, saw all the landmarks, went into the capitol building, saw the room where the constitution was signed, saw the declaration of independence with my own eyes, I started to get it. Then last year we had a college football game (arkansas vs. texas, last one ever, big game) on 9/11 and we (the u of a band) did a tribute show where we played TAPS and scrolled the names of the soldiers who died from arkansas on the big screen, played amazing grace and sang the last line (and grace will lead us home) and then the soldiers who had returned home came onto the field in dress. The entire stadium was standing and cheering, all 73,000 people. Lights were flashing, F-16's flew over head, the soldiers who were standing there were crying, and I started to cry. I looked at my best friend who was crying, and at that point, I got it. I think its more than anyone can get from a text book, its so much deeper than that......



On a lighter note, if I EVER hear or have to play stars and stripes forever (known in the piccolo world as suicide) AGAIN I SOMEONE WILL GET HURT!
post #15 of 18
In a letter from John Adams, we rote just how we should celebrate the 4th. He mentions parades and picnics at least, he may even mentioned fireworks, not quite sure if fireworks were here then or not. I see the 4th as a day to celebrate our founders. they risked life and limb when they signed the Declaration of Indpendance 229 years ago. It really is amazing that we even won. If we had lost at Seratoga, the French would have never have helped out. You have to thank men like Ben Franklin, for helping in getting the help of the French. You have to thank George Washington, Alexander Hamleton, Aaron Burr, John Adams, Samuel Adam, Thomas Jefferson, and the other men who helped get this country off the ground. You have to thank those who rose against the new American government during Shay's Rebellion, with out them we would not have our Consitution. You have to thank those who took charge of this nation in the 1st 50 or so years of this nation. Without these men and the countless others who will forever remain nameless, this country would never have gained it's freedom.
I think we focus too much on WWII and the Civil War. Not that they shouldn't be remembered, but on the 4th of July our main focus should be on the founders, but that's just me.
post #16 of 18
I take it very seriously. I love the USA!!! Given all our faults, to me there is no more beautiful, wonderful country in the world. I am grateful to all of the servicemen/women who have died or risked their lives giving me the freedoms that I enjoy today God Bless the USA!!!
post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roxy_loves_CJ
I honestly never was very into the flag waving that so many americans were into. Then my best friend when to iraq. I started dating someone who had just gotten out of the army (broken up now). When I watched the news everyday hoping to see a glimpse of my friend in the background, when I read the paper hoping not to see his name, that is when it all started to sink in. I went to washington DC and saw the wall with all the names on it, saw all the landmarks, went into the capitol building, saw the room where the constitution was signed, saw the declaration of independence with my own eyes, I started to get it. Then last year we had a college football game (arkansas vs. texas, last one ever, big game) on 9/11 and we (the u of a band) did a tribute show where we played TAPS and scrolled the names of the soldiers who died from arkansas on the big screen, played amazing grace and sang the last line (and grace will lead us home) and then the soldiers who had returned home came onto the field in dress. The entire stadium was standing and cheering, all 73,000 people. Lights were flashing, F-16's flew over head, the soldiers who were standing there were crying, and I started to cry. I looked at my best friend who was crying, and at that point, I got it. I think its more than anyone can get from a text book, its so much deeper than that......

On a lighter note, if I EVER hear or have to play stars and stripes forever (known in the piccolo world as suicide) AGAIN I SOMEONE WILL GET HURT!
That story brought tears to my eyes!!! What a beautiful tribute.
And as a former band nerd (albeit a saxophone player), I'm with on the whole playing Stars and Strips deal!
post #18 of 18
I take it very seriously. My father was a WWII veteran and was shot down over Germany. He was a POW for almost 2 years when he and my mother were first married.
This country has faults, but I would never want to live anywhere else.
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