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worried about my pregnant cat

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
my 1yr old cat is due to give birth in about 2 weeks ( unless ive got the dates wrong).

at the end of january this yr she got pregnant for the first time but we didnt realise untill she was about 6 weeks, i didnt realise i needed to change her food so kept her on the same food i also had my mind on other things as i had a baby of my own on feb 25th.

she was due to have her kittens first/second wk in april but at the end of march she went into labour at the time i didnt realise she was early. At first i wasnt sure if she was in labour or not it started on the thursday night she wouldnt eat or drink wasnt really moving about and stayed where we cud see her and she was very quiet i kept trying to get her to eat or drink but she wouldnt she stayed the same on the friday then finally on saturday evening she decided to have them on the chair in the lounge

i first realised it was definately happening when i noticed water all on the chair from her she then started pushing the first one came out and she seemed like she didnt know what to do she slightly licked it then left it alone my partner had to take the sack off of it and rub it but unfortunately nothing happened and it was dead

we phoned the vets and spoke to them they basically said the wouldnt treat her if we took her in because there wasnt really any complications

almost 2hrs later he started pushing again after almost 30 mins of pushing she delivered the second baby again she wasnt interested we tried but this one was dead to.

an hr later she started pushing the last one out again she wasnt interested and we tried but we couldnt do anything. all three of her babies died we phoned the vets again they said that the reason she wasnt intersested in them was probably because shes so young and didnt know what to do.

me and my partner looked at the kittens and realised that they were early and thats why they didnt live.

she became very depressed refused to eat of drink wouldnt clean herself i was having to force feed her for almost 3 weeks she was very ill and dehydrated but finally she came round and one morning started eating

because of what happened last time im very worried about her and the kittens does anyone know anything about when cats go into labour early and has anyone got any advice

please
post #2 of 21
Perhaps you can inform your vet of her previous delivery and he can help. Also, with her previous complications, I would definitely reccomend getting her spayed after these kittens are born and weaned. I hope that everything goes well!
post #3 of 21
I am curious why you didn't get her spayed after the first delivery? Some cats just do not want to be a mom, and have no such instincts. I would read up on complications during birthing, talk to your vet, and get this cat spayed after this litter is born. Be as informed as possible and prepare for the worst and hope all goes well.
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
i know it sounds stupid but i know my cat and i know she wanted them shes that type of cat

i was planning to get her spayed but time flew by and i didnt realise untill she was on heat my head was on other things my 2 kids planning my wedding for sept plus an access case going on in court with my daughters father so it slipped my mind i definately wont be forgetting this time though.

last night she has been eating alot, double what she normaly eats does anyone know if this is a sign that its gonna happen in the next week or so i know the other signs which she isnt really showing yet apart from trying to find somewhere to have them ive placed boxes with blankets in them in two of the places she likes to sleep but she hasnt gone near them since i put them there oh well she will have them where she wants
post #5 of 21
Normally a cat will eat less or stop eating in general before she has them, though some cats eat the same. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think increased eating is a sign.
post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJandBilly
Normally a cat will eat less or stop eating in general before she has them, though some cats eat the same. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think increased eating is a sign.
errr unless your my cat who did just that! lol

Maverick didnt have any of the usual symptoms of going into labour though until her waters broke.

i'd ask your vet or atleast ring them and say whats happening. having had a difficlt labour before it would be good to have some expert advice or atleast someone on hand for when she does give birth.

where in the uk are you? i might be able to help yo find some low-cost spay clinics after the birth.
post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by devilgirl
i know it sounds stupid but i know my cat and i know she wanted them shes that type of cat

i was planning to get her spayed but time flew by and i didnt realise untill she was on heat my head was on other things my 2 kids planning my wedding for sept plus an access case going on in court with my daughters father so it slipped my mind i definately wont be forgetting this time though.

last night she has been eating alot, double what she normaly eats does anyone know if this is a sign that its gonna happen in the next week or so i know the other signs which she isnt really showing yet apart from trying to find somewhere to have them ive placed boxes with blankets in them in two of the places she likes to sleep but she hasnt gone near them since i put them there oh well she will have them where she wants
Might be a good idea to set up the spay appt. now. Also, make sure she has no access outdoors until she is spayed. My friends cat ended up with 5 litters of kittens....and there really isn't a shortage of kittens anywhere.

Katie
post #8 of 21
Do you have any idea when she went into heat and when she conceived? That way you can keep a close eye on her when she is approaching 60 days.

Any delivery before 58 days is too early and they will die.
Good luck!
post #9 of 21
Thread Starter 
i think she concieved extactly 8 weeks ago today well at least thats when she came on heat ive rang the vet and he said just to watch her while shes in labour and if she gets into any trouble to ring them

fingers crossed
post #10 of 21
oh good luck to momma cat!!! cant wait to hear updates

awwwwwwww i love new kitties
post #11 of 21
Thread Starter 
when my cat delivers her kittens should they be moving and i mean before she has removed the sac etc
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by devilgirl
when my cat delivers her kittens should they be moving and i mean before she has removed the sac etc
No, after she removes the sac, and cleans them, that's when they should begin moving. Keep a close eye on them to see if they are.
post #13 of 21
Well, I'm no expert by any stretch of the imagination (my cat just gave birth, first one I've ever witnessed, and no doubt last, since she's getting spayed directly after weaning), but two things here that I noticed:

1 - The stillborns in my cat's litter were not moving within their sacs when they were born, and no amount of stimulation from the mom or myself could revive them. The live ones, however, were wildly moving within their sacs before they were even removed. I didn't know that some cats can be not moving and then begin to move only after the sac comes off. What I did make sure to do, though, was to remove the stillborns from the nesting box so she could tend to the next kitten that came; she almost let one die in the sac because she was still trying to revive the stillborn one. As soon as I realized she wouldn't stop, I removed the stillborn, and directed her attention to the new kitten (and had to remove the sac for her, because she was late getting to it).

2 - This one cracks me up: my cat ate during delivery! :-) I don't know what gave me the thought, but I offered her a handful of Tender Vittles in between kittens, and she just gobbled them down. She continued to gobble them down even as she began contracting, and only stopped for the final push and to tend to the new baby. As soon as that kitten was cleaned off and everything, she went right back to eating the Vittles out of my hand. I guess there's no sure eating sign to go by, huh?
post #14 of 21
Thread Starter 
she has got alot quieter the past 2 days, also when she lying down asleep she cant seem to settle or get comfy which i know cud be cuz shes so big but didnt affect her untill she started getting quieter she is also washing herself alot and i mean all over not just down below

does anyone know if these r signs?????
post #15 of 21
those definitly are signs!
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
another question, ive got a litter tray in the house for her to use and she does but she always wants to go out i read on the internet around there due date u should keep them in 24/7 i especialy want to because of what happened last time but is it true should i keep her in or let her out??
post #17 of 21
Keep her IN! During, before, and especially after. She can get pregnant again in no time. Keep her in until you can spay her after the weaning.
post #18 of 21
DO NOT LET HER OUT! If you let her out, the chances are she will have her kittens in the wild, exposed to wild animals, disease, and all kinds of danger. Please, oh please, keep her in. Also, you need to keep her inside afterwards, until the kittens are weaned because you'd be surprised how fast a cat can go back into heat after having kittens. I once had a cat who had kittens and within one week was pregnant again!
post #19 of 21
Thread Starter 
shes having her kittens 3 so far all fine except the with the third she hasnt chewed the cord or delivered the placenta and she shows no signs of doing so shes just lying there help what should i do
post #20 of 21
You'll need to cut the cord yourself.

This site has detailed directions for how to do this, as well as right here in this forum, at this post.

First, you have to make sure the sac is off the kitten and that it is free from fluids and breathing freely. Then you have to cut the cord. The first site from above gives these directions:

Sometimes the kittens come in such quick succession that the mother won't have time to attend to both. Two possible problems can occur. First, the membranes may not be cleared away from around the mouth and nose and the air passages may stay blocked. As the mother is busy alternating licking and cleaning each kitten, one may not receive enough stimulation to make him breathe on his own. This is a life-threatening problem. The second problem related to rapid births could be a failure of the mother to detach the placenta. This, however, is not a life-threatening problem.

Attend to the first problem: the kitten's breathing. Gently wipe the kitten's face with your finger wrapped in a soft towel. In most cases, simply handling the kitten will stimulate him to breathe. Wipe the kitten dry very carefully. It's very easy to tear a newborn's skin, especially around the flank folds and inner thighs. If the kitten doesn't start breathing, cradle him in a towel in the palms of your hands. Put him on his back with the hind feet toward you and gently swing the kitten downward toward the floor. This causes the fluid in the airways to flow upward and out the nose and mouth. Be especially careful not to fling the kitten out of your hands. Hold the kitten properly and do not swing aggressively.

If you are confident that a kitten is breathing but his attachment to the placenta is still intact, tie the umbilical cord off tightly with a piece of thread or dental floss. Place one knot about an inch from the kitten's abdomen and a second one just a little bit beyond. Sever the cord between the two. Do not tie the cord if it is thick or irregular in diameter. A loop of intestine may have herniated through the abdominal wall and may still be inside the umbilical cord. If you're not sure, call your veterinarian rather than make a serious misjudgment.


You can sever the cord with sterilized scissors (sterilize with soap and hot water, not alcohol).


After this is done, put the kitten next to the mother's body to keep it warm, or put it on top of a heating pad on the lowest degree of warmth and covered with a towel. If you don't have a heating pad, you can fill a sock with rice and microwave it for a minute. Make sure it's not hot! Cover that with a towel to keep it from being directly in contact with the kittens if it seems hot to you.

After you have cut the cord and put the kitten safely aside, the placenta out has to come out. Hopefully, the mother will expel it herself. If she does not, then you have to take her to the vet to have it removed, because a retained placenta can cause infection.

Good luck!
post #21 of 21
If she hasn't delivered the placenta, you need to call your vet.
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