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How to go about becoming an Ex-Pat?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I thought it best to post here, in IMO, since some may have strong feelings as why not to. If I am wrong please move this

Do not get me wrong, I love Canada. But it is just not "doing it for me" anymore. I adore many parts of Europe, especially the UK and Italy (family reasons) and I am growing more and more restless to be there.

I have heard all of the "you are too young to know what you want", "why don't you go for a while and see", ect. I am not too young, I have been, and I just want out.

For me this is a major decision, for Brandon it is more of an adventure. That bothers me, but ultimately, I want out, and I will do what I need to do.

This will not be for at least 5 years, but why not plan ahead?

If anyone has any advice for me, or places to get info (that would be a huge help, I can't seem to find anything), or any personal experience I would greatly appreciate it!
post #2 of 15
Ash theres bound to be a few who can advise you such as Jenny.

I don't think your too young to start thinking about it, it's not as if you were a 14 year old!.

Whats wrong with Canada?
post #3 of 15
Ash, I don't know why you are becoming disenchanted with the maple Leaf, but I can think of a bunch of reasons why I would, and if it is the restrictive political environment, then why don't you consider a move "south" ?

You would be welcomed to one of the southern states, and if you were to look into a rural, depressed (economically) area, you would be free as a bird to do whatever suited your fancy (within VERY broad limits, of course) and would find the living as it should be, allowing a person to stand on their own two feet and make it or fail, as they chose to do.

Leonard
post #4 of 15
move to london, i love it here!
post #5 of 15
If you have chosen a country, try contacting their consulate in the city nearest you for information regarding what kind of papers you would need to live and especially to work in Europe.

Our daughter is currently trying to get her Dutch citizenship (my husband's family are Dutch and he's first generation). With that citizenship she will be able to live and work in Italy where her boyfriend lives.

Or as Leonard suggests, there is always the southern US of A where apparently "anything goes" and far more liberal than Canada.
post #6 of 15
This is just a question...But I see you live in Alberta...Canada is such a beautifully varied and vast country that I don't see why you couldn't find what you are looking for in another piece of it...If you are for example, looking for somewhere less conservative, how about BC? If you are looking for a bigger, cosmopolitan more European city, how about Montreal?
Just wondering how such a vast and large place can have you wanting out...
post #7 of 15
Your best bet is to contact the country in question's consulate. There are often websites containing immigration information. I'm assuming that your chances would be best in the UK, since Canada is a member of the Commonwealth. Britain also has a low unemployment rate in comparison to the Continent (c.10% in many European countries).
And you're not "too young" - I was your age when I moved over here.
post #8 of 15
Move to the Southern US because it's liberal? Excuse me while I laugh! That's pretty funny. There are certainly parts that are more liberal and allow you to be who you want to be, but a significant chunk of my family lives in Texas, and it isnt a bastion of freedom by any means. The Southwest is the prettiest I think. The Northwest is definitely pretty and has a lot going on culturally, the Eastcoast is very liberal, has a lot going on, but isn't very pretty for the most part (there are certainly beautiful areas there), the Midwest is just the midwest- we have a lot of corn, but we have some nice spots as well- probably not what you're looking for.

Canada (the goverment) has this amazing website that teaches you how to become a Canadian national or citizen, maybe other goverments have the same sort of website? We are keeping Vancouver and Toronto in mind for potenial moves later in the future, which is how I found that website.

My vote is for London!
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by esrgirl
Move to the Southern US because it's liberal? Excuse me while I laugh! That's pretty funny. There are certainly parts that are more liberal and allow you to be who you want to be, but a significant chunk of my family lives in Texas, and it isnt a bastion of freedom by any means. The Southwest is the prettiest I think. The Northwest is definitely pretty and has a lot going on culturally, the Eastcoast is very liberal, has a lot going on, but isn't very pretty for the most part (there are certainly beautiful areas there), the Midwest is just the midwest- we have a lot of corn, but we have some nice spots as well- probably not what you're looking for.

Canada (the goverment) has this amazing website that teaches you how to become a Canadian national or citizen, maybe other goverments have the same sort of website? We are keeping Vancouver and Toronto in mind for potenial moves later in the future, which is how I found that website.

My vote is for London!
Actually, when I was replying the first part was dead serious (consulate) and the second was tongue-in-cheek to Leonard's response. I myself thought that Canada was a great deal more "liberal" than the southern US of A.
post #10 of 15
1) Job Route:
Make sure you secure employment in the destination country. To help with the job search, if you have sufficient skills, you can sign yourself up with one of those "head-hunting" or placement groups and you may get offers from another country.

Either that or make sure that the country is one where you do not need an employment pass to search for a job.

Also you could (if applicable) request the company you are working for, for a overseas attachment.

2) Education Route:
An alternative if you do no have sufficient skills or that your skills may not match, you may consider a master's program in a top university in the destination country.

3) Information:
Checking the destination country's immgration webpage should give you information. Some countries even have a special organisation and website to cater to recruiting people from other countries.

4) Vacation:
You may want to take a vacation in the destination country first if you are going in their "blind" with no job to make sure that, that is the place you really want.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks!
To answer questions about why, like I said I adore Canada. It is not the government or that it is too conservative. I LOVE Europe and as I said, particularily, the UK and Italy. I have family in both countries. Maybe this will sound silly, but I always feel like I should be there, not here.

Anyway, thanks for your ideas, I will look into them
post #12 of 15
I think it is good to get experience in different places before deciding where you eventually belong. But living somewhere is completely different from visiting it. Many Americans and Canadians love Europe, but we have many here who are working and going through terrible culture shock. The best hting, if you want to travel and maybe live somewhere else on day, is to get qualifications in a field that is in demand and universal- IT, medicine, language teaching are examples, though might need further training, and not in something which is country-specific eg law. Then either as a volunteer or employee look for openings in the country you want to try. There are employment laws for foreigners almost everywhere so do contact the consulate/embassy first to find out what problems you might have, but often volunteers are welcome. Also a good route is to do an educational course in your chosen country - you learn to live there, and if you don't like it you have learnt something new anyway. As a studentr you often learn about job opportunities too.

To live as an expat you need an open mind, a flexible attitude to everything and an insatiable curiosity. You may need language skills too. I know people who have been here ten years and barely speak a word, then say they find people unfriendly! ANd don't expect things to be like they are at home - they are usually neither better ot worse but they ARE different!
post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
and not in something which is country-specific eg law.
Not exactly true. There are many lawyers who move around. There is quite a bit of headhunting going on even from countries to countries. And there are many people who are qualified in multiple jurisdictions. I know of people who have worked in California and New York, England and parts of Asia.
post #14 of 15
Fair enough, but it is more difficult, unless you specialise in somethng like European Union legislation or international commerce. Criminal and family law vary enormously, as do the legal systems and most people have to retrain.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyranson
I think it is good to get experience in different places before deciding where you eventually belong. But living somewhere is completely different from visiting it. Many Americans and Canadians love Europe, but we have many here who are working and going through terrible culture shock. The best hting, if you want to travel and maybe live somewhere else on day, is to get qualifications in a field that is in demand and universal- IT, medicine, language teaching are examples, though might need further training, and not in something which is country-specific eg law. Then either as a volunteer or employee look for openings in the country you want to try. There are employment laws for foreigners almost everywhere so do contact the consulate/embassy first to find out what problems you might have, but often volunteers are welcome. Also a good route is to do an educational course in your chosen country - you learn to live there, and if you don't like it you have learnt something new anyway. As a studentr you often learn about job opportunities too.

To live as an expat you need an open mind, a flexible attitude to everything and an insatiable curiosity. You may need language skills too. I know people who have been here ten years and barely speak a word, then say they find people unfriendly! ANd don't expect things to be like they are at home - they are usually neither better ot worse but they ARE different!
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