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Oh Dear! Kitten Adopter Wants to De-Claw

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Just found out, after my daughter's friends have been working on their mom to get a kitten, and she finally said yes, that she will have it declawed! Do those nail caps really work? I'm going to suggest those, otherwise - they don't need a kitten that bad.
post #2 of 14
perhaps inform them of all the pro's and con's of declawing, as well as providing some literature so they can make an imformed decision, either way.
post #3 of 14
If they are thinking that way it really is rare to change their mind. I would decline that home and find another (if it were me) Heck, I would even keep the kitten-
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta
Just found out, after my daughter's friends have been working on their mom to get a kitten, and she finally said yes, that she will have it declawed! Do those nail caps really work? I'm going to suggest those, otherwise - they don't need a kitten that bad.
Here is a really good site on teaching your cat to scratch appropriately:

http://www.pawschicago.org/PetCare/catscratching.htm

if they still want a declawed cat...there are plenty needing homes at shelters.

Katie
post #5 of 14
I agree with the others. I have had several people try to adopt my fosters who want to declaw, some people who swear they've changed their minds (we still don't let them adopt). No matter what other people think about declawing *my* babies will not get declawed.
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by kluchetta
Just found out, after my daughter's friends have been working on their mom to get a kitten, and she finally said yes, that she will have it declawed! Do those nail caps really work? I'm going to suggest those, otherwise - they don't need a kitten that bad.
It doesn't sound like a good home in any case. Sounds like a mother really didn't want a kitten, only the children did. Well, not a good case, as the mother would be one taking the cat to the vet and spending money. We just had a child posting here, crying, with a sick cat and parents flat out refuse to take the cat to a vet. If parent's aren't cat lovers, and don't want the animal, I don't think anything good will come out of it.
post #7 of 14
You are in a tough spot here, I think. I certainly do not envy you this!

It is hard sometimes to make the right decision about where our babies should go. On the surface, everything appears fine and you really think the people are great ... then you find out the truth.

As gracefully as you can, decline to place a kitten with these people. I know you want to find homes for your kittens, but the object is to find homes that will provide care that is up to ~your~ standards ... if you are unwilling to declaw, then so should your potential kitten people be.

And when asked why ... which you will be, trust me ... you do not have to give an answer. You can just say no and leave it at that. You are under absolutely NO obligation whatsoever to explain yourself. Be strong and be brave, but just say no.
post #8 of 14
Absolutely agree, unless they are willing to abide by a no-declaw statment [enforcement of which is virtually impossible], and instead look into the alternatives, I would decline them.

As others have said also, if the mother doesn't really want a cat, and the children are not old enough to handle the responsibility on their own, then I would definately doubt they would be willing/able to put forth the effort required to work on the alternatives.

While it isn't the end of the world [other thread for discussing this], Declawing definately shouldn't be considered "part of having a cat" as it seems to be in this case.

There are better homes for this kitten, please do what you know is necessary.

Spotz
post #9 of 14
Myself I was actually going to have my cats declawed until I found buddy - I found him outside of work one day - He was totally defenseless and unable to catch his own food. He had been declawed and he either run away from his home or was left somewhere because where I work there is no homes handy. When I realized this - I said NO WAY because god forbid but what if one of my babies got out or even lost how could they find food or defend themself if needed. I will never get my cats declawed and don't I recommend it to anyone and if any one says they want to do it I try my best to convince them otherwise. POOR LITTLE GUYS ...
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Wish I'd been more graceful as you all suggested.

Complicating matters, of course, the daughters are best friends with my girl. They are going on vacation tomorrow for a week and we really didn't want them thinking that whole time they would be coming home to a kitten. Basically the mother says, "no cat in my house unless it is declawed," and I told the girls that I had to stand up for my babies since they can't stand up for themselves. (The mother has expensive furniture, and wouldn't even let a cat on the sofa, anyway.)

Of course the girls blame my daughter because they, "almost got a kitten," but we told them there were tons of declawed cats at the shelter that they would learn to love too. Unfortunately, I wasn't very graceful or tactful, because I really, really never thought that someone I knew would declaw a cat. (It's like, way out there on the cruelty scale for me.) What's a couple more kittens anyway?
post #11 of 14
Keeping a cat off of the sofa!!!! You did the right thing. How can you snuggle with your kitty if he can't get on the sofa? I can't imagine trying to keep any of my pets off of the furniture. They are all lap pets, cats and dogs alike. Your kitten would not have been happy in that house. To many restrictions. She would soon think her name was no no bad kitty.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
My husband said, "No one's going to mutilate those kittens. They can just stay here." (The people are now thinking of taking 2 - one for each daughter.)

Has anyone had experience with the Soft Claws nail caps? They actually look kind of cool. But what a mess. My daughter's convinced they will never talk to her again. Thanks everyone, for your support!
post #13 of 14
It is a hard lesson for your daughter, but maybe she can turn it round and explaing to her friends what it means to declaw. And I certainly wouldn't give kittens away on the chance that they will use softclaws, as they can be fiddly to apply and don't work 100%. It is too likely they will give up and go for the declaw anyway.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
I keep using the phrase, "standing up for those who can't stand up for themselves," so hopefully that is the lesson all three girls will be able to take with them.
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