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Polydactyly in cat shows??

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I was just wondering if polydactyly is generally allowed in "Household Pet" sections of cat shows. I know that section is for non-purebred cats, so obviously the standards are a bit looser (not that the cats aren't just as lovely.....I'm not trying to insult anyone's babies here ). I'm asking because I'd like to give a show a try, but I think only Sammy would be able to be shown. Lola is a beautiful example of a domestic shorthair brown tabby and very personable as far as loving to be pet and played with ON THE GROUND, but she does NOT like being held, especially by strangers, so I don't think she'd enjoy herself. She'd freak out and wiggle until the judge dropped her, then lay at (or on) his feet where she'd expect HIM to lean down to pet her . So that just leaves Sammy, who is a 1 year old, VERY long, lean, gorgeous black tuxedo cat with a laid back temperment. Sammy is very tolerant about being held and poked at, BUT he has polydactyly on his front paws, so I'm not sure he's eligible to be shown, unless there's some sort of "Mutant Freak of Nature" category
Have any of you ever heard of a polydactyl cat being eligible to be shown?
post #2 of 25
I depends on the cat association behinf the cat show. Polydactyl cats aren't allowed at FIFé-shows at all. I don't know how it works at CFA-, CA-, TICA-shows though.
post #3 of 25
If there is a Household pet class for that particular show, you can show a polydactyl cat. The whole purpose of the HHP class is to show off your rescued kitty As long as he/she can be handled by the judge, you are good to go. The biggest thing is making sure they are healthy, groomed, ears clean, and nails trimmed.
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandie
If there is a Household pet class for that particular show, you can show a polydactyl cat. The whole purpose of the HHP class is to show off your rescued kitty As long as he/she can be handled by the judge, you are good to go. The biggest thing is making sure they are healthy, groomed, ears clean, and nails trimmed.
Not to hijack the thread.. but how do you prepare for handleing... My Zoey is a bengal mix and when her coloring is finally all finished I would love to show her.. in a household kitty show..
post #5 of 25
You won't know for sure until they are actually there, how they will do. A few things you can do at home is check their ears, and check their nails. By getting them used to their feet and ears being handled it will help. The cats are generally judged on a table of sorts, so sometimes putting them on a table faced away from you and checking these things can help
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sandie
You won't know for sure until they are actually there, how they will do. A few things you can do at home is check their ears, and check their nails. By getting them used to their feet and ears being handled it will help. The cats are generally judged on a table of sorts, so sometimes putting them on a table faced away from you and checking these things can help
Thanks for the tips! Sammy's pretty good about being handled, including his paws and ears, so he should be okay........but maybe I'll have someone he doesn't know well come over and do it a few times before I show him, so he can get accustomed to a stranger doing it.
post #7 of 25
If polys can be shown in the HHP category...I might as well start calling Circe "Grand Premier" right now.

Well, she is easier-going and less of an escapekitty than Roko, after all...

-Qit
post #8 of 25
I don't believe they should be shown. Domestic or Pedigree.
post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
I don't believe they should be shown. Domestic or Pedigree.
May I ask why not Sam? Just curious
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondiecat
May I ask why not Sam? Just curious
Because he or she considers it a "deformity."

-Qit
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondiecat
May I ask why not Sam? Just curious
Because even though it isn't (in most cases) a handicapping deformity, cats with extra toes shouldn't be bred, they can't be shown here in NZ and we are trying to stop people from breeding them too (Maine Coones, in particular)

Definitly some personal preference in there too!
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qit el-Remel
Because he or she considers it a "deformity."

-Qit
Thanks, I can answer my own questions in future!

Looks like all you have come here for is to argue about Polydactal cats and people, because you seem to be bumping all the posts about them

here's a link http://www.catworld.co.uk/articlecat...20experts&pre=
post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Thanks, I can answer my own questions in future!

Looks like all you have come here for is to argue about Polydactal cats and people, because you seem to be bumping all the posts about them
Actually, I wasn't arguing. I was talking about one of my cats and sharing a story that I'd read.

However, it seems like a bit of a touchy subject for you.

Considering the fact that the author finds polydactylism less worrisome than white fur, I don't think that article supports your position very well.

-Qit
post #14 of 25
LOL hardly a touchy subject with me..

I posted the article to show you that it IS a deformity - that's all!
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
LOL hardly a touchy subject with me..
So why the insistence that a (spayed) poly cat should not be shown (in the DP division)?

Quote:
I posted the article to show you that it IS a deformity - that's all!
Actually, the author says (emphasis mine): "In the true sense of the term, polydactyly is a deformity, but in common parlance that carries unpleasant undertones."

AFAIK, zoologists and geneticists tend to use the term "deformity" to denote harmful mutations. Benign or beneficial mutations are called "anomalies." That author is using "deformity" as a synonym for "anomaly."

Of course, I have heard the occasional claims that post-axial polydactyly is harmful. But there seems to be no actual proof of this.

-Qit
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leli
Hi,

I was just wondering if polydactyly is generally allowed in "Household Pet" sections of cat shows. I know that section is for non-purebred cats, so obviously the standards are a bit looser (not that the cats aren't just as lovely.....I'm not trying to insult anyone's babies here ). I'm asking because I'd like to give a show a try, but I think only Sammy would be able to be shown. Lola is a beautiful example of a domestic shorthair brown tabby and very personable as far as loving to be pet and played with ON THE GROUND, but she does NOT like being held, especially by strangers, so I don't think she'd enjoy herself. She'd freak out and wiggle until the judge dropped her, then lay at (or on) his feet where she'd expect HIM to lean down to pet her . So that just leaves Sammy, who is a 1 year old, VERY long, lean, gorgeous black tuxedo cat with a laid back temperment. Sammy is very tolerant about being held and poked at, BUT he has polydactyly on his front paws, so I'm not sure he's eligible to be shown, unless there's some sort of "Mutant Freak of Nature" category
Have any of you ever heard of a polydactyl cat being eligible to be shown?

Yes, in the North American cat registries, polydactyl cats may be shown in household pet classes. In fact, they seem to do fairly well in those classes - they look adorable with their big old feeties. Additionally, there is one breed of cat - Pixiebob I believe? - which allows for polydactyls in the championship classes in TICA.

Sam, we don't have polydactyl Maine Coons in the U.S. because polydactylism is a dominant trait and therefore extremely easy to avoid. No standard in our registries allows for a Maine Coon with extra toes, and I know of no breeders who either breed them or want to get them accepted. Are there some people breeding them deliberately in New Zealand?

As for an author describing polydactylism as a deformity, rather than an anomoly, the connotation is that this is a bad thing. But there are many vets here in the States which describe the head type of a Persian or a modern Burmese as being a deformity, and you don't feel that way. In fact, I know of a person who took in a Persian for a c-section, and the vet put all the resulting kittens to sleep (although they were born alive) because he was sure that their skulls were deformed Horribly sad, isn't it? I think whether one likes polydactyls (or Persians or modern Burmese) or any other trait that isn't a lethal is a matter of personal preference.

Barb Amalfi
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
Because even though it isn't (in most cases) a handicapping deformity, cats with extra toes shouldn't be bred, they can't be shown here in NZ and we are trying to stop people from breeding them too (Maine Coones, in particular)

Definitly some personal preference in there too!
Okay I understand that but couldn't a rumpy Manx be considered a deformity? Just curious because The Sammycat is a "Special Needs Kitty". He has a 1/2 inch of his spine missing to the end of his body. This causes him to have trouble holding his urine while he is sleeping on occassions and sometimes his back end will be weaker when he is jumping and he will fall.

Don't get me wrong I love him to death! I just can't even think about putting him down because of his Special Needs. Sorry to get here but I am just curious.
post #18 of 25
personally i don't like it but i do agree that they look like mittens
post #19 of 25
Quote:
Sam, we don't have polydactyl Maine Coons in the U.S. because polydactylism is a dominant trait and therefore extremely easy to avoid. No standard in our registries allows for a Maine Coon with extra toes, and I know of no breeders who either breed them or want to get them accepted. Are there some people breeding them deliberately in New Zealand?
I am so glad to hear that Barb. Yes some people are deliberately breeding them here in NZ and some stupid breeders are trying to get it put in the standard!!


Quote:
As for an author describing polydactylism as a deformity, rather than an anomoly, the connotation is that this is a bad thing. But there are many vets here in the States which describe the head type of a Persian or a modern Burmese as being a deformity, and you don't feel that way. In fact, I know of a person who took in a Persian for a c-section, and the vet put all the resulting kittens to sleep (although they were born alive) because he was sure that their skulls were deformed Horribly sad, isn't it? I think whether one likes polydactyls (or Persians or modern Burmese) or any other trait that isn't a lethal is a matter of personal preference.
Yep, agreed!
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondiecat
Okay I understand that but couldn't a rumpy Manx be considered a deformity? Just curious because The Sammycat is a "Special Needs Kitty". He has a 1/2 inch of his spine missing to the end of his body. This causes him to have trouble holding his urine while he is sleeping on occassions and sometimes his back end will be weaker when he is jumping and he will fall.

Don't get me wrong I love him to death! I just can't even think about putting him down because of his Special Needs. Sorry to get here but I am just curious.
It could be considered as a deformity, yes.
post #21 of 25
Yes of course, and it may just be an advantage! Something "not normal" to catch the judges eye.

HHP's are for any mixed breed (spayed/neuter over 8 months), not declawed, and in good condition/groomed. You can also show purebred that do not conform to championship competition. However, a lot of judges (especially in CFA) will bypass the purebred look alikes in favor the mixed breeds. In ACFA/TICA the purebreds do a lot better.

Enter your kitty (if it meets the above criteria) and see what happens. HHP is very competitve!
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tailsoluv
Sam, we don't have polydactyl Maine Coons in the U.S. because polydactylism is a dominant trait and therefore extremely easy to avoid.
Actually, nearly half of all of the first Maine Coons were poly. It was deliberately bred out of mainstream show stock.

Quote:
No standard in our registries allows for a Maine Coon with extra toes, and I know of no breeders who either breed them or want to get them accepted.
They're out there (yes, in the U.S. too).

Quote:
Originally Posted by WellingtonCats
[b]I am so glad to hear that Barb. Yes some people are deliberately breeding them here in NZ and some stupid breeders are trying to get it put in the standard!!
Now, now. Just because someone disagrees with you does not make them "stupid." (Considering the breed's history, I'd say that they're just nostalgic.)

Quote:
As for an author describing polydactylism as a deformity, rather than an anomoly, the connotation is that this is a bad thing. But there are many vets here in the States which describe the head type of a Persian or a modern Burmese as being a deformity, and you don't feel that way.
IMHO, Persians/modern Burmese are only "deformed" if they have breathing problems...which (if my sources are correct) are sadly becoming increasingly common in those breeds. A flat-faced cat that can breathe properly, however, is just...a flat-faced cat.

Quote:
In fact, I know of a person who took in a Persian for a c-section, and the vet put all the resulting kittens to sleep (although they were born alive) because he was sure that their skulls were deformed Horribly sad, isn't it?
That's beyond sad. If the kittens appeared to be breathing normally, that's sick.

Quote:
I think whether one likes polydactyls (or Persians or modern Burmese) or any other trait that isn't a lethal is a matter of personal preference.
Agreed. My opinion on Persians and modern Burmese is about like that of Aurora151989's on polys: In other words, the worst thing that I'll say about them is that they're a rebuke to the notion that all cats are cute.

By the way, one of the ugliest cats that I've ever seen was a poly. (His sweet nature made up for his face, but that's another story and shall be told another time.)

-Qit
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tailsoluv
I think whether one likes polydactyls (or Persians or modern Burmese) or any other trait that isn't a lethal is a matter of personal preference.
A trait can be harmful even if it isn't lethal. And as with Manx, sometimes a trait is lethal only if it's homozygous.
post #24 of 25

I'm thinking of showing my cat. He's a poly any advice i have never shown before

post #25 of 25

What type of advice are you looking for xlctawn?

I showed my polydactyl Maine Coon, Roxy, in CFA in the Household Pet class as a kitten, and also in TICA in the New Traits class. I've never had a judge look negatively at her due to the extra toes. The New Traits judge gave her a good critique and had good things to say about her conformation and the HHP judges always exclaimed when they noticed her "thumbs" and pointed it out to the audience but not in a negative way. They realized that this was why she was in HHP class (she couldn't be shown as a MC in CFA due to the extra toes.)

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