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Will Dori change if we get a puppy?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have really missed everyone! I have been so busy lately with the new house, figuring out what we are doing as far as getting married (we can't decide where or when ), school, and work that I just haven't had much free time.
Dori has adjusted fantastically to being in the new house. She is back to tearing up the blinds just like the old days in the apartment
I promised my fiance that once Dori was settled in we could think about getting a puppy, a rottweiler to be specific. I have read all about introducing them slowly. But what I really want to know, is if she is going to change. Dori is my sweet girl who runs to me when I get home from work, lets me kiss her good bye, sleeps with me at night, and lays in the middle of my text book when I am doing homework. I am so worried that all of that will change. Have any of you ever brought a puppy into an only kitty family? How did the kitty react? Dori is 2 and 1/2 years old and has never been around another animal.
post #2 of 15
I took a sharp intake of breath when i saw "Rottweiler" because over here they have a bit of a bad name, but i don't know if thats because how people have them

I've no idea Tanya?, i just know how Rosie reacted when Sophie came home.
post #3 of 15
i think it depends. Maverick has become very nervous and insecure but her behaviour towards me hasnt changed a bit. Jupiter (the kitten) hasnt changed at all and whilst he hates the puppy doesnt really mind that its here.
post #4 of 15
depends on her really I have always had multiple animals in the house so everyone learns real quick deal with it.. but she is young enough that she shouldnt have to hard of a time ..
post #5 of 15
So long as she has a chance to get used to the animal, and the animal understands that she is not a toy or food, but a friend, there shouldn't be a big problem.

Rottweilers have a reputation for being a somewhat more aggressive breed, but I tend to lean towards the nuture theory on behavior. Good socialization on both their parts, and good training on the part of the rottie will definately help make things smooth.

Give them time to get acquainted with each other in a safe environment, and things should work out absolutely fine

Spotz
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
My very first concern when my fiance discussed getting a Rottie was that I was going to come home one day and the Rottie have seriously injured Dori. I was completely against getting one. I have asked several people who have experience with Rotties and have researched online to learn as much as I can about the breed. I feel comfortable, at this point, with getting a rottie puppy (nothing over 12 weeks), introducing him to Dori slowly and allowing him to grow up around her. From what I understand the first year of the Rottie's life is the most critical in forming the relationships they have with the family members (including other pets). I absolutely will not consider getting an older Rottie because I won't know their background and would not be able to feel comfortable with it home alone with Dori.
I think my concern is that the Rottie will be able to do outside activites with us and I worry that is going to make Dori jealous and upset and hate me for it. I can just picture me leaving for an evening walk with the dog and Dori being confused and upset that I chose to talk the dog along with me and am leaving her there
I am really torn in my decision. I don't want to get a dog until I am 100% sure about it. It's not fair for me to not let him get a dog because he got Dori for me even though he really didn't like cats. So I do feel obligated to get one, and I do want one, but I want to do the best thing for Dori.


I forgot to mention, I plan to definatley take the Rottie to obedience training once he (we want a boy, they are less aggressive) is old enough.
post #7 of 15
Sounds like you have a great plan there.

Success is quite common with such an approach.

Don't worry so much about the bad things that 'could' happen, try to focus on the many more positives that are much more likely to happen. Dori will have a friend to keep her company, and if she trains him right, a faithful servant to rule over from her cat tree. She will probably be more annoyed with the noise the doggie can make, than the fact that he gets to go on walks outside. In fact I'd suspect she just might enjoy an occassional break from the commotion when y'all are out for a walk.

Try and find a Rottie rescue group in your area, or a good breeder, go meet with them and meet some of their dogs. Get an idea of what exactly to expect ahead of time, and see what kind of advice they can offer on properly raising and training your future puppy.

You're doing a great thing, and it would be especially great if you are able to rescue a young rottie.

Definately keep us posted,

Spotz
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
I sure hope your right Spotz. I hope I am able to do it right and keep everyone happy

I really want a rottie from a rescue group rather than a breeder. I like the idea of rescuing one, but I have had a very tough time finding young puppies at any of the rescue groups in the southeast.

I will definately keep you updated on how things go.
post #9 of 15
Yes rotties do have a bit of a bad rep, but they are wonderful dogs and if raised correctly they make lovely pets. There is a rottie at the end of my street who gets angry at me each day as I walk to and from the bus stop, he flies at the fence and barks and barks and barks(he does this to everyone who goes past) he's always outside too.

Good luck Tanya.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by squirtle
I sure hope your right Spotz. I hope I am able to do it right and keep everyone happy

I really want a rottie from a rescue group rather than a breeder. I like the idea of rescuing one, but I have had a very tough time finding young puppies at any of the rescue groups in the southeast.

I will definately keep you updated on how things go.


Spotz
post #11 of 15
We keep Caeser(large dog) and the cats (Orei and Princess) separate for now. your dog has to throughly understand the "leave it" command in order for things to be safe. I don't mean just memorizing when you practice. I would suggest a smaller dog if you are worried about Dori changing.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by squirtle

(we want a boy, they are less aggressive)
Your plan sounds pretty good, but I must dissagree with this statement. My friends have females, and they are very docile, while my male (he is from the pound though) has a few behavioral problems. Her female is from the pound also.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilovecats
Your plan sounds pretty good, but I must dissagree with this statement. My friends have females, and they are very docile, while my male (he is from the pound though) has a few behavioral problems. Her female is from the pound also.
I am not talking dogs in general, I meant Rottweilers specifically, and with them the female is naturally more dominant. This is why we have made the decision to get a male and a small puppy at that. It is my opinion that long term the sex of the dog plays only a small part in the way they interact with people and other animals, I think it will be based more on the way they are raised.
post #14 of 15
Tanya, we have had Sandy puppy for 3 months now and she just turned 16 weeks. She is a LabxBorderCollie and she is a delight. We had some bahavior issues with her the first month but she's settled in nicely with Sasha and Saba. She's just a pup, so it's very similar to having an infant on caffeine in your house. If you wouldn't let a baby walk around unsupervised then don't allow your puppy to - and lots of loving, firm schooling will help. We worked with Sandy's discipline in a very loving but firm fashion right in front of Sasha & Saba and for whatever reason, this worked really well. They could see Sandy was a baby and treated her as such. It was very interesting to see. Both Sasha & Saba have not changed towards us at all, and Saba has only been with us 5 months as it is. In fact, their own bond together strengthened after Sandy came into the house. Sasha now washes Saba's little face and everybody sleeps on the bed together!
P.S.... I did want to add that the rest of the upstairs is Kitty City and no dogs are allowed past our room. They really have appreciated this. If you can, make sure Midori knows she has her own, private, quiet space.
post #15 of 15
hey tanya, getting the rittie from a puppie and allowing him to grow up with Dori is a very good idea
I got my puppy last year, she is a staffy, and we got her from 11 weeks old, and since she has grown up around socks they adore each other now, i was really worried in case socks changed, but he did'nt, not toward's me.
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