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Daschands(sp?)

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I went to Petsmart yesterday and this man had the most adorable long haird dashand I have ever seen,,she was kinda orange/brown colored and she was just soo adorable! She had the prettiest face..are these dogs good with kids/cats? when I buy myself a house, I am planning on getting a dog..just trying to figure out what kind and all that.....Just wanted to share about the sweet doggy I saw...she was just so precious and proud looking!
post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock&Fluff'smom
I went to Petsmart yesterday and this man had the most adorable long haird dashand I have ever seen,,she was kinda orange/brown colored and she was just soo adorable! She had the prettiest face..are these dogs good with kids/cats? when I buy myself a house, I am planning on getting a dog..just trying to figure out what kind and all that.....Just wanted to share about the sweet doggy I saw...she was just so precious and proud looking!
Hi
They are cuties, aren't they..
Well, first, any dog should be purchased not for their appealing looks to you but to fit in with your family.
Ie, If you want a dog to go jogging, but you think pugs are "cute", don't get a pug! They won't do the jogging thing
or if you want a low energy couch potato dog, don't get a dalmatian!

So, first look into what the particular dog was bred for over the years.
Yes, dogs do retain the serious instinct for what their ancestors may have worked all day at.

Dachshunds were bred for hunting vermin and rabbits above ground.
Therefore, they have the typical hound characteristics of being stubborn, willful and tough..This kind of work had to ensure the dog was tenacious and determined!!

So, while in your quest for a dog, it would be a good idea to get a dog from puppyhood with this character as if he is older, he may not adapt from seeing a small furry cat and chasing it...To be honest, you can't always guarantee that a dog with the drive to chase furry soft things, even if hand reared by you, won't be a threat to your cats..but its a safer bet if he was exposed to them at an early age.

With kids, you have to ensure that, as with any dog, the child knows how to handle dogs. Especially with dachshunds who can develop lower back problems, a child should not be allowed to pick this dog up...
No pulling of tails, no shrieking, no mishandling..But these are good guidelines for any dog..

That being said, Dachshunds are also known to be little clowns and very entertaining..

But with any dog, MAKE SURE you go to a thoroughly researched reputable breeder..
A puppy mill or backyard breeder is NOT a good idea...This is a dog that tends to be overbred and the bad qualities that the dog suffers with tend towards snappiness towards strangers or children, shyness, and other problem behaviours, not to mention medical problems.

Good luck!
And remember, obedience school is a must for this type of dog!
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Great tips!! Thanks...I know this kind of dog are barkers...my parents neighbors have3 of them, and they bark alot...my mom doesn't like them but I think they are cute...the owner will pick them up and still, they keep on barking..it's too cute.... again...thanks for the info on these doggies...we use to have one a long time ago when I was a child, and her name was Muffet, I remember her digging alot too as well as barking....we had had another dog besides her, and after the other dog had babies, Muffet would go and take her babies and lay them with her like they were hers instead....
post #4 of 22
We have a dachshund, Jasmine is her name and she is such a cutie. She is a year old now. Our dachshund Punkin passed away last fall, she was 17 years old. She was a great dog, loved to go everywhere with us. She grew up with the kids. She was older than my youngest daughter and she was always really good with kids. They are VERY stubborn though. They like to dig ALOT!
They are prone to back problems, although Punkin never had any problems with hers, she was shorter in length than some. She was purebred though. My sister had a 3 year old male that was very long in length and he started having severe back problems and she had to put him to sleep cause the vet couldnt do anything for him. Our current one is a cross between a standard size and a miniature. She gets along great with the cats, she sleeps on the back of the sofa with them, sometimes I think she thinks she is a cat.
post #5 of 22
I grew up with one incredible Siamese (with me from age 2 1/2 to 17) and several litters of dauchounds. They indeed, as noted elsewere, like to bark or howl at times, and don't let them near (if you live in the country) a woodchuck hole..bye, bye dog...unless as was the case they are plump enough to get stuck trying to get down in there (tee hee!).

They are affectionate, good with kids, stubborn, howl every time the fire station alarm goes off (!!), and while they would tease my cat, they never went to hurt (they would do the waggle bottom dance, slink under the chair he was on, grinning (yes, they could and did grin) and wagging their tails. He would watch, watch, then swat a bit of skin off their noses..sending them shrieking off to us. It was a routine that continued for years).
post #6 of 22
Dachshunds (literally, badger dogs) are very pigheaded, and definitely barkers. They're extremely popular in Germany, particularly the larger, rough-haired variety, but have a "mixed" reputation. Some are great with kids, while others are rather nippy. Unfortunately, I know more of the latter kind, including two (different owners) that are downright vicious. According to the statistics here, the only breed of dog that bites more often than a dachshund is a German shepherd.
post #7 of 22
Our neighbors when I was growing up always had a short-haired dachshund. They did not have cats, but occasionally would come to visit with the dog, and they were always very well behaved with our cats.

However, by about 6 years old they always seemed to get severe health problems. I don't know if they were just unlucky, but although they went to a good breeder, as the dogs aged they had problems.

As puppies, they are about as cute as possible. I think for kids, labs and golden retreivers are nice (although I have never owned either LOL). We usually get mixed breed dogs.
post #8 of 22
Once I get a house I am planning to get a mixed breed dog too. I work at an animal hospital and most of the dachshunds I've seen can be snippy. Although my mom's best friend has one who is the sweetest thing and couldn't hurt a fly.

Luveysmummy is right, you should do a lot of research on breeds before getting one. I've seen a lot of people who get dogs because they've seen them and they look cute but they had no idea what they were in store for. Unfortunately, I've also seen people get rid of their animals because of this.

My favorite type is a big, goofy, sweet "heinz 57" dog. Labs and goldens can be very nice and good with kids too. But there are some that can be quite nasty or extremely hyper.

My advice would be to go to your local shelter or rescue group. Not only would you not be spending a lot of money that you would getting a dog from a pet store. But they'll be spayed/neutered, up to date on all shots and healthy.

Sadly, you wouldn't imagine the amount of sick animals I see that come in from puppy stores. It makes me quite angry to have to see families go through the trouble and heartache that results from a sick animal.

Good luck on whatever your decision is. I'm sure he/she will be one lucky and very much loved pup.
post #9 of 22
The only experience I have with daschunds is my sister-in-law's dogs. In the years I have known her, she has had four, in various groupings. There's just one at the moment. Russell is a sweetie. They have all been sweet dogs. And I'm a little surprised at the remarks about barking, because none of them was a barker. Exception to every known rule, I guess.

During the reign of the original two, there were also two cats in the family, and no problem between cats and dogs that putting the cats' food dishes on a shelf a foot off the floor didn't fix.

Good luck with your research and whatever decision you make about adding a dog to your fur family.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by GratefulBear629
Once I get a house I am planning to get a mixed breed dog too. I work at an animal hospital and most of the dachshunds I've seen can be snippy. Although my mom's best friend has one who is the sweetest thing and couldn't hurt a fly.

Luveysmummy is right, you should do a lot of research on breeds before getting one. I've seen a lot of people who get dogs because they've seen them and they look cute but they had no idea what they were in store for. Unfortunately, I've also seen people get rid of their animals because of this.

My favorite type is a big, goofy, sweet "heinz 57" dog. Labs and goldens can be very nice and good with kids too. But there are some that can be quite nasty or extremely hyper.

My advice would be to go to your local shelter or rescue group. Not only would you not be spending a lot of money that you would getting a dog from a pet store. But they'll be spayed/neutered, up to date on all shots and healthy.

Sadly, you wouldn't imagine the amount of sick animals I see that come in from puppy stores. It makes me quite angry to have to see families go through the trouble and heartache that results from a sick animal.

Good luck on whatever your decision is. I'm sure he/she will be one lucky and very much loved pup.

There are some great points being made about adopting shelter dogs or puppies! I think that if you don't have a definite idea of what you want the dog to do..Ie, if you don't need to buy a purebred for a specific purpose like showing or competing in obedience trials etc, then go to a shelter where you may find the dog of your dreams in more than one flavour rather than buying a dog for looks.

GratefulBear is 100% correct in that so many dogs end up in shelters as they were bought when they were cute puppies for their looks and people don't realize the particular breed's needs.
For example, labs are popular but notoriously overbred and notoriously hyper dogs that need ALOT of exercise. These are working dogs. They are not content with a backyard (in fact no dog should be kept in the backyard and left to its own devices to get enough exercise).
Many labs and mixes end up in shelters because they are "too hyper", they "jump up" or "they bark"...Duh! These are owner caused problems, not the dogs fault.


And I second the comment about NOT going to a pet store.
They get their dogs from puppy mills the majority of the time.
These dogs are often shipped like cargo, are sickly, are maltreated and undernourished and overbred and they seem to think that they can charge 30% over and above what a reputable breeder does the majority of the time.

And if you are intent on a smaller breed dog, there are many small breed rescues all over the planet

Off of soapbox now
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
Dachshunds (literally, badger dogs) are very pigheaded, and definitely barkers. They're extremely popular in Germany, particularly the larger, rough-haired variety, but have a "mixed" reputation. Some are great with kids, while others are rather nippy. Unfortunately, I know more of the latter kind, including two (different owners) that are downright vicious. According to the statistics here, the only breed of dog that bites more often than a dachshund is a German shepherd.
Its funny as when I had Dobermans (a german dog as well), and my german friends came to Canada to visit, they wouldn't even meet them.
They said that in Germany, people are always scared of dobermans as they are so vicious..I was incredulous as my two and (many dobes here) were big sucks..They were somewhat aloof to strangers but were not vicious in any way and were big sucky lapdogs
They still wouldn't budge!
post #12 of 22
From what I understand, doxies are great with kids in general. I don't know about cats, that might depend on the dog. aren't they cute dogs I was looking at getting one before I got Limerick. I found the cutest red long hair doxie at the pet store (I would never get an animal from a pet store). She wanted to spend all her time in my lap.... sooo cute!!!
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveysmummy
And I second the comment about NOT going to a pet store.
They get their dogs from puppy mills the majority of the time.
These dogs are often shipped like cargo, are sickly, are maltreated and undernourished and overbred and they seem to think that they can charge 30% over and above what a reputable breeder does the majority of the time.
It's amazing what pet stores try to get away with. Unfortunately, it happened to me before I knew any better. I had bought a kitten at a pet store in my area. Actually, I had bought a "kitten starter kit" and got the kitten free. She was a little sniffly when we bought her but I really thought nothing of it. She seemed very outgoing and playful. But the sniffles didn't go away. She did get better at one point but just totally crashed one day. She passed away with what we think was FIP. Unfortunately, I couldn't get any money (I spent **atleast** $500 on her, food, supplies, vet bills, etc) back because I had bought the kit and got her free. A way they trick you so they aren't liable for anything.

I've also seen many puppies come in with pneumonia, congential birth defects, etc. One family paid $1000 for a pit bull. The father bought it for protection for his wife and two young kids as he worked nights. Now this puppy came with a health certificate stating he was seen by a vet. This puppy was pure white with blue eyes. Now not all people may know, such as this gentleman, but almost all animals that are pure white with blue eyes are deaf. But a vet should most definitely know that and I would assume a breeder would know as well. The first thing one of our vets asked when she walked in the room was "Is he deaf?"

So this guy had to not only go through the hassle of taking it to the vets (more than one to prove to the store that it was truely deaf to return it). But his family had to go through the heartbreak of getting attached to the dog and having to give it up.



Sorry about such a long post but this is something that just disgusts me.

post #14 of 22
We had Dacshunds when I was a kid. I found them to be extremely intelligent, and neither of our were barkers. The first one thought she was one of the kids, and always went out to play with the neighbourhood gang. She was also extremely protective of my younger brother, especially when he was a baby. She was extraordinarily loyal, and would take him for walks and keep him out of trouble. There is a classic family story about the time that little brother, grandma and the dog went "downtown" (It was a small town, the little shopping plaza with about 6 stores in it was 4 or5 blocks away). Then, neither of them could remember the way home. So they just told the dog to go home, and she showed them the way.

Our second dog loved playing with the cat next door. The cat taught him how to stalk birds. Neither of them ever caught a thing, but it would crack us up, watching the cat prowl through the grass, hiding behind flowers, trying to sneak up on the poor bird. And following behind, tail wagging, would be the dog. When she crouched down to lie in wait, he'd sit behind her. They would do this for hours.

Both dogs loved water. The first dog loved going to the beach with us kids, and helping dig in the sand. She really was a digger, and we would use her to help dig out sand forts in the woods behind our house. The second dog would jump in the bathtub with you if you didn't close the bathroom door tightly. He had to be locked out of the laundry room on laundry day, or he would try to jump in the tub. And we had to buy him his own little wading pool, or he would crawl under the fence and jump in the pool next door, and they would have dog hair floating on top. He would spend hours on his own, picking up stones, and dropping them in the water, then jumping in his pool, ducking underwater to pick them up, and toss them out on the ground, to start all over again.

He also loved trumpet music. My brother played trumpet, and couldn't practice anywhere in the house without the dog singing along. Brother would be in his bedroom, with towels stuffed around the door as a sound barrier, and the dog would sit outside in the hallway, with his ear pressed up against the door, listening. And when the music started, the dog would sing along. I still have a cassette tape of "Jesu Joy of Man's Desiring", for Solo Trumpet, with Dog accompaniment. And not just trumpets live, he would sing along to trumpet playing on the television, or on the stereo. He'd sit in front of the speakers, howling.

We loved our Dacschunds. I'd get another one in a minute, if I lived in a house.
post #15 of 22
I've found that Dachshunds are loyal, but rather sensitive- and often are possessive. Not neccesarily a bad trait, however, our dog was a little nippy because we would play wrassle his blanket and such. Please beware that this is a dog that requires some maintenance as far as monitoring weight and ensuring good back health. This is, I find, especialy true of miniature dachshunds. also examine the feet of any puppy you buy, some of them are known to have bad ankles that sort of get ducky once they're mature. They're really loving dogs, though, and require relatively little space, or time for walking (though, they do like to go rooting round a great deal. Mine loved cats, and would work in tandem with our neighbor's cat to make sure that there were no voles in the area. Also big on chasing squirrels.
post #16 of 22
I'm not what you would call a "dog Person" but I absolutely LOVE long haired Dachsunds! I also love westies and great danes I feel its better though if anyone ever wants a dog to just go adopt one :P besides, the purebreeds usually cost $$$. :P Sometimes you can find the cutest mixed breed doggies at pounds!
post #17 of 22
I am not a dog person but I have a soft spot for daschunds - my landlord had a long haired one and he was the sweetest little thing, he loved being around people and just loved being cuddled. I adored him to bits.

But if I was ever to get a dog, I would get a doberman - they are the biggest babies around, but they are sooo loyal and really wonderful pets - 2 of my good friends have dobermans and they are both big babies but also protective. I am taking care of one right now while her owners are in Palau. I love her to death and wish I could take her home to NZ with me.
post #18 of 22
My Nana used to have a friend live with her who owned a daschund called Wobby, he was the sweetest little doggy!
post #19 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwideus
I am not a dog person but I have a soft spot for daschunds - my landlord had a long haired one and he was the sweetest little thing, he loved being around people and just loved being cuddled. I adored him to bits.

But if I was ever to get a dog, I would get a doberman - they are the biggest babies around, but they are sooo loyal and really wonderful pets - 2 of my good friends have dobermans and they are both big babies but also protective. I am taking care of one right now while her owners are in Palau. I love her to death and wish I could take her home to NZ with me.
You have good taste!
I was once owned by dobes and yes, they are known as the big sucky lap dog. Mine were rescues and I did alot of work in that area. They had a couple issues and they are NOT for a novice dog owner though...
They need daily work and training.
They also usually bond with one person primarily so they aren't a typical family dog.
But aren't they breathtaking running across a field at top speed..sigh!
CHeers!
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thank you everyone for your comments on dachands...now I really really want one...I have a neighbor over here that has a short haired miniature male and I took the kids swimming and she was out walking her dog....I had to start asking questions...lol...his name was Target, he was a sandy brown all over, and seemed to be very friendly,,,she has a big kennel she keeps him in during the day while everyone is gone at school or at work, and has never had anyone complain of him barking...I have heard him bark a few times, but what's a dog without a bark theyh ave to sometimes....again..thanks everyone!!!!
post #21 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loveysmummy
Its funny as when I had Dobermans (a german dog as well), and my german friends came to Canada to visit, they wouldn't even meet them.
They said that in Germany, people are always scared of dobermans as they are so vicious..I was incredulous as my two and (many dobes here) were big sucks..They were somewhat aloof to strangers but were not vicious in any way and were big sucky lapdogs
They still wouldn't budge!
When did they visit? Four or five years ago, a little boy in Hamburg who was outside playing during recess was killed by two American Staffordshires who jumped the fence into the schoolyard. That led many German states to ban so-called "dangerous breeds", i.e., pit bulls and their variants, outright, and to require that other large and "potentially dangerous" breeds, including Rottweilers and Dobermanns, be leashed and muzzled at all times outdoors. The owners have to pay really steep license fees (over $1,000 annually in my area), prove that they have no criminal record, and have the dog tested for aggression. That's when the statistics on dog bites started to be published. What the statistics don't tell you is that Shepherds and Dachshunds are the most popular breeds, so naturally there are more bites than, say, by Airedales or Viszlas, which you rarely see here. Ear cropping and tail docking have been illegal here since the late 80s (1987, if I remember correctly), and the Dobermanns look far less dangerous with floppy ears and long tails.

I personally prefer big dogs, and think they're less apt to nip kids because the kids don't tower over them. Then again, the only small dog we ever had was a Beagle (wonderful with kids, but not so great with cats). The absolute best dog we had with children was a Boxer (he adored children, and was very protective of them), and he was wonderful with cats. Unfortunately, he was horrible with other dogs after being bitten and injured. I'm just not certain that a Dachshund qualifies as a "beginner's dog", any more than an Airedale, Dobermann, or Shepherd does, because they can have dominance issues.
For a beginner, I'd suggest a mutt, a Beagle or Fox Hound, or a Labrador or Golden Retriever. The two latter breeds are those most often used as guide or companion dogs nowadays, because of their docile temperaments and intelligence, and since they're not as prone to hip dysplasia as Shepherds. That said, my parents spent decades adopting Labs from shelters (my mom still has two), and two of the ones they adopted were great with family, but couldn't be trusted with visitors. Without exception, they all got along with cats.
post #22 of 22
Sorry, but I would tend to agree with Jcat on this, Rock and Fluff's mom.
Any hound or any dog with known stubbornness issues or say training challenges is not a beginner's dog.
Dogs like these, ESPECIALLY, in a house with children, other animals, requires consistent experienced training unless you are very prepared for behavioural issues.

I don't mean to be a downer but there are many great "starter" dogs which can make the transition to dog owning easier and more rewarding!

And JCat, they have been over a few times, but this was a few years ago with the dogs... They told me that all dobermans in Germany are muzzled and they thought it was a different line of dog in Germany. This is true to a certain extent.
North American lines seem to be geared towards more of a gentle dog whereas in Germany, they breed more working lines. So I can understand their apprehension.

And even here, a poodle is the most popular dog for biting, but these bites are often not reported as they are small and least "fatal". A more random bite from a Doberman could land you in the hospital and thus, dogs in the "big/scary" category often get a bad rep which leads stupid people to invest in the "bad dog" which in turn gives the dog a bad rep. sigh..

Also, smaller toy/companion dogs are often coddled and spoiled. This leads many smaller dogs to get the bad rep as barkers and nippy...This only causes smaller dogs to think they are alpha and be thoroughly unpleasant.
Bottom line, don't coddle or constantly pick up and treat your small dog.
Treat him like a big dog. He doesn't know he is any different

Cheers
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