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Ethical dilemma re: neutering

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi cat fans,

Wasn't entirely sure where to put this post so since I only just registered I thought I would put it here with an introduction.

I'm a uni student in the UK, since we moved into this house in September there's been a male unneutered cat coming round to visit us. I've never been sure if he really is stray or not, if not then he doesn't spend a lot of time at home. He disappeared over Easter so I thought his owners had moved.

He came back the other day though, doesn't seem any different, maybe a bit thinner. The problem is he's extra horny, he always used to try and hump your arm every so often but now it's like he's posessed. He also whines all the time. He used to pee in the house before, a littertray fixed most of it but I still wouldn't trust him alone.

You would probably neuter a definite stray in this situation but is it right that I go ahead since I'm not sure if he is?

Thanks,

-Ryan
post #2 of 18
I would. If he has owners and they are that irresponsible, they don't deserve to have him.
post #3 of 18
I would neuter him as well. I have in the past neutered "stray cats" that appeared on my land and found out later they weren't stray at all but neglected cats of neighbors. No one has ever taken me to task for neutering their cat. Usually (in my experience anyway) the cat isn't neutered because 1). The owner could care less or 2). The owner "can't afford it."

This cat could be a lost pet so if you take him in ask the vet to scan for a miccrochip
post #4 of 18
I agree...I'd take him to be neuterd. He'll be much better off afterwards.
post #5 of 18
I would also neuter him!!

Katie
post #6 of 18
I would neuter him. He probably disappeared for a while due to his hormones, off chasing girl cats. He is more likely to fight and be injured if unneutered. If he hangs around a lot, most likely he has no owner. It is amazing how many people dump cats! Thanks for helping this guy.

Welcome to TCS!
post #7 of 18
I don't know what the situation in the UK is, but there are some legal implications here. If the cat belongs to someone, a pet is (however much we may abhor the notion) the "property" of the "owner" and you cannot just go ahead and perform surgery on the cat without the permission of the owner.

Now, in this country, in most localities there are procedures to go about to determine whether or not an animal is a stray. You have the right to capture this animal in a live trap (or lure it into your house if you can) and provide for it until it's determined whether or not it's a stray. To determine whether it's a stray, there are certain procedures to be followed. Check to see if there are such where you live. Usually this involves notification of the appropriate authorities, and a search for an owner. Ads in the newspaper, check at the licensing bureau, etc.

Once you've done all this within a certain time period, then the animal is declared a stray and you can take legal custody of him in order to have him neutered.
post #8 of 18
Welcome to TCS!!
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies, I read them on my phone while at work which was the oddest experience.

Not sure if this is irony but I named the cat Fluffy Bollocks back in September and that name stuck.

I've wondered about how to determine if he's a stray before and that's what's stalled me on getting him neutered. Advertising a found cat wouldn't bring up anything if his owners don't consider him lost. I thought about putting a collar on him with a note in it but that's kinda sad. I might ask the cat's protection league for advice on this.

I think this is going to involve a discussion in the house on whether we're (as a house) are willing to keep him. I go away for holidays and I'm not sure my housemates can be trusted to look after him. One of them would be happy enough to kick him out till I came back - he likes animals but FB's behaviour is too much for him, he's not willing to put any effort into pets. My other housemate claims she loves him and but shuns responsibility too easily.

Would neutering stop him from pee'ing on beds and things? Is that a territorial thing? He knows how to use a litter tray so he must be choosing to do it for a different reason?

This will sound pathetic but only last week I was feeling really down, one of the things that came out was how much I missed FB and blamed myself for his disappearance because I'd gone home for Easter. So now he's back I want to make him happy.

-Ryan
post #10 of 18
Ryan....

Neutering would help with "spraying" which I think you are referring to...however, you may also want to have him checked out for a UTI (urinary tract infection).

Katie
post #11 of 18
Hello and welcome!!

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TNR1
Neutering would help with "spraying" which I think you are referring to...however, you may also want to have him checked out for a UTI (urinary tract infection).
I caught him crouching once but that was before I got the litter tray so it could just be a case of having nowhere to go that time.

Thanks, if I end up taking him to a vet I'll mention that.
post #13 of 18
Welcome and thanks for caring for this cat!

The rule at my house: If you wander up to my house and I feed you, I neuter you. No questions asked. You are doing this boy a great favor by having him neutered. It will most likely eliminate all of the behavior problems that you are seeing in him now (mounting, spraying, elimination), and give him a much longer and healthier life. I agree to have him checked out for a UTI.
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany
The rule at my house: If you wander up to my house and I feed you, I neuter you. No questions asked.
Your dinner guests must get a big shock

Thanks though.
post #15 of 18
Question... do you feed the cat? How long have you fed him. I know here in Florida, if you feed a cat for over 3 days, he/she is legally yours. Chances are, it's a stray. I would think, especially since he went away and came back thinner.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJandBilly
Question... do you feed the cat? How long have you fed him. I know here in Florida, if you feed a cat for over 3 days, he/she is legally yours.
That's an excellent example of what I meant by finding out what the legal requirements are in your locality. If you meet the legal requirements for determining if the cat is a stray and then for making a stray cat legally yours, then no one can give you any trouble about neutering the cat. If you don't know, I think the easiest way to find out would be to just call a local shelter. They probably do this every day.
post #17 of 18
Hi And Welcome to TCS!!!
post #18 of 18
I would have him neutered. Just think of all the homeless kitten he has fathered already. You are doing a VERY good thing if you have him neutered.
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