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Ordering Pizza in the Year 2010

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Be sure you have your speakers on!

http://www.aclu.org/pizza/images/screen.swf
post #2 of 17
Now that's scarey!
post #3 of 17
Holy cow! That is scary....just think about what our grandchildren will have to go thru.
post #4 of 17
Cheeze whiz!! I think i'll just pass on the pizza!!
post #5 of 17
The second time I ordered a pizza they asked for my phone number which I gave, then they told me my last name and address, it was not, a nice feeling to know that the local pizza hut has me on there database.They can even tell me how many pizza's I have ordered and what type is my favorite based on the one ordered the most.It makes you wonder about privacy doesnt it.
post #6 of 17
eeeppp i mean butt out of my food!
post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistys mum
The second time I ordered a pizza they asked for my phone number which I gave, then they told me my last name and address, it was not, a nice feeling to know that the local pizza hut has me on there database.They can even tell me how many pizza's I have ordered and what type is my favorite based on the one ordered the most.It makes you wonder about privacy doesnt it.
But you have to tell them who you are and where you live for them to deliver the pizza, don't you? It's not like they have an accouting of your checking account balances or something, and it's not like they don't need that particular info.

I mean, if you trust the driver enough to let him walk away with a CARBON COPY OF YOUR CREDIT CARD, does it really matter that your love of mushrooms and pepperoni is registered in a database somewhere?

I always thought it was funny that (in the US anyway) our idea of "good old times" always involves someone bellying up to a counter in a diner while the waitress says "Hey Joe! Want the usual?", and yet the idea of a teenager in a pizzahut asking us "Mr. Smith, would you like your usual?" makes us think the terrorists are coming.
post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianlojeck
But you have to tell them who you are and where you live for them to deliver the pizza, don't you? It's not like they have an accouting of your checking account balances or something, and it's not like they don't need that particular info.

I mean, if you trust the driver enough to let him walk away with a CARBON COPY OF YOUR CREDIT CARD, does it really matter that your love of mushrooms and pepperoni is registered in a database somewhere?

I always thought it was funny that (in the US anyway) our idea of "good old times" always involves someone bellying up to a counter in a diner while the waitress says "Hey Joe! Want the usual?", and yet the idea of a teenager in a pizzahut asking us "Mr. Smith, would you like your usual?" makes us think the terrorists are coming.


Thanks for the best laugh I've had in a while. Your perspective was truly hilarious.
post #9 of 17
Thanks for sharing. That was sooo incredibly funny!!! But isn't that the way modern society is headed to a certain degree? And that IS VERY scary!! Next time you sign one of those HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) forms at the doctor's office be VERY, VERY careful to read the fine print.
post #10 of 17
The ACLU has given groups like mine permission to use that clip when talking about domestic violence. It's a very interesting clip, but think how dangerous that knowledge is in the hands of an abuser who is stalking their victim....gives me chills
post #11 of 17
ok, hang on... I just watched that clip, and that is ABSURD.

Yes, you need to be careful with your personal information, and yes you shouldn't give out your birthday or ss# to anyone who asks, and yes there are a lot of people who would love to have this information, but just for a moment consider the economic realities of this.

It costs $55(?) to run a credit check on someone. can you imagine what it would cost to run a health check on everyone who ordered a pizza? Can you imagine the logistics framework that would have to be in place to combine the databases of every major retail/credit/health/economic/law enforcement system in the world? Getting information from that non-existant company would be HIDEOUSLY expensive.

Yes, information is available freely, but the accuracy is POOR. Visit one of those "find people for free" web sites and run a search on my name. You'll find an address in Long Beach, California where I haven't lived in almost three years. Even some of the sites that charge money will turn up my old address as current.

Privacy is important, and we should be keeping an eye on laws and any forms we sign, but let's not let our paranoia get the best of us.

The most pervasive and effective method to gain personal information is not huge "Big Brother" style databases and information systems, it's what's known as "social engineering". Essentially, it's asking someone for information and making them think it's good to give it to them. Emails that appear to be from banks, offer letters from sons of princes trying to save their fortune in Nigeria, people coming up to you on the street and asking you to enter a contest to see if you have "today's most complicated password", and can they have your email address for prize notification?

Sorry, folks, but the only thing that scares me about this is the statement that the ACLU is using this clip to promote it's own views. Wouldn't it be better for them to limit the ways a wife-beater can get his wife's information RIGHT THIS MINUTE then in some mythical future? (but that's another discussion...)

(on second thought, I might understand why the ACLU uses this. I suspect the average person is more upset that pizza might cost $20 more then they are about wife beating. That's why I have a bumper sticker with a Charles Shultz quote on it: "I love mankind; it's the people I can't stand.")
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianlojeck
Privacy is important, and we should be keeping an eye on laws and any forms we sign, but let's not let our paranoia get the best of us
I was being very sarcastic about reading the fine print of HIPAA forms. I hope no one took my statement that serious.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissCharlotte
I was being very sarcastic about reading the fine print of HIPAA forms. I hope no one took my statement that serious.
I read the fine print.

just once, but I read the fine print. ;-)
post #14 of 17
Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.
post #15 of 17
[quote=brianlojeck]ok, hang on... I just watched that clip, and that is ABSURD.

Of course it's absurd, it's a SATIRE, and I don't think it's too far off the mark. I say...

Thank goodness for the ACLU!
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of Franz

Thank goodness for the ACLU!
Indeed!!
post #17 of 17
I know some people are going to flip when I say this but I feel that while parts of it seem absurb and funny like the size of the person's pants, other parts seem quite fine to me.

It is a fine line between paranoid tracking and good service. For example, some hotel chains keep information on customers likes and dislikes and when you visit another of its branch elsewhere, it remembers this and does it without asking. There is also this clothing place that I go that keeps my personal information but I do not really mind and sometimes feel safer when I make use of their free tailoring service for repair or alterations any clothes bought there, even if it was bought sometime back.

There is really nothing wrong with a National ID system and it is really convenient. Some European and Asian states have it. After all it beats using a driver's licence, which does the same thing but it leaves people who do not drive at a disadvantage. And the ID card can even be put to good use. Some ID cards have fingerprints on them and whenever a crime is committed, fingerprints from the crime scene is run through it and a large percentage of the criminals are caught in such a manner.

Even the surcharge on the "bad" food is not all that spectacular. For example, a person who smokes have to pay a higher premium for his insurance but everyone seems to think that is fine.
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