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Just curious... how much is a normal tip???

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
okay, so if you go to a salon and you have 3 things done(like haircut, color, and eyebrows) do you give the person a tip for each individual one, or just a little more than you usually would for one thing... does that make sense

i usually figure up how much i would give for each individual thing and then add it all together, then i end up giving like a $15dollar tip(for the three listed above) off of a $80 dollar bill...

does that sound like too much or not enough... i just figured out how to tip at resturants and now i feel weird when i give my stylist a tip cuz i am not sure if she is insulted or excited about the amount....

help please, i am clueless!!
post #2 of 23
It can be difficult attempting to figure out how much is the "right" amount when tipping outside of a restaurant setting. What you gave is pretty much 20%, which I would guess is probably more than they are used to getting. But honestly, with things like that, I just kind of go with my gut. Leave as much as you feel comfortable with and you should be good since there really aren't any firm guidelines as far as those situations are concerned (as far as I know).
post #3 of 23
I'm a haidresser so let me think how to awnser this........Ok, the shampoo girl a couple of dollars, the colorist and stylist 15% to 20% of bill, factor in ,time spent ,and they job they did too. Katherine's right whatever you feel comfortable with , Its really hard to say , I over tip constantly b/c I work for tips hoping the good karma will come back my way!
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
okie-dokie! thank u guys 4 your insight!

much appreciated!
post #5 of 23
Just a quick note... I've heard some etiquette people say that tipping 20% is now more appropriate than tipping 15%. And that's if you're just satisfied, if you're really pleased then you should tip more.

I also thought I read that you're supposed to individually tip each person that helped do your hair - the person that washed your hair, the person that cut your hair, the person that dyed your hair, etc. But I never do that.

That being said, when I get my haircut I usually just tip 20% unless I can afford more or unless I'm wow-ed by the job done. And I *hate* that when I go to Visible Changes I have to go find the hairdresser to hand her my tip because usually she's disappeared. I'd rather just write the tip amount on my receipt and let them give it to her, ya know?
post #6 of 23
i feel uncomfortable with the whole tipping culture as i'm never to sure how much to give.

i also feel really resentful that we are expected to tip certain people on top of an already high bill in some industies but not others. eg. yes in a restuarant but no in mcdonalds or in a shoe shop
post #7 of 23
The hardest time I ever had with tipping was when I went to a day spa and had a massage, facial, shampoo and style, and manicure with paraffin. It had been a Christmas gift so I had no clue how much any of it was separately let alone all together. I just had to guess and so I went by how much work each of them put in. But I really had no clue how much I should have been giving them.
post #8 of 23
the last hairstylist I went to, she was to cut and highlight/lowlight my hair to make a dark contrast. Well it looked the same afterwards. No contrast, the same color, same length, etc. I was very sick and they wouldn't let me cancel because they have a policy which is fine, but that meant I had to go there completely ill and probably made everyone else sick too. But she left me under the dryer for 45 min while she ate lunch and was nowhere to be seen and I was bad off, dizzy and naseous and couldn't breath well so the dryer made it much worse and I really felt like she didn't care. I tipped her 10% I think but I should have tipped her -15%. Never goin back!
post #9 of 23
i wouldnt have tipped at all!
post #10 of 23
i always tip as i do at the restaurants -
20% if great
15% if ok
105 if HORRIBLE, but never less than 10%


So, if I had a $35 dollar cut, i'd leave a $5 tip.
post #11 of 23
Same here. If you can't do your job well enough to deserve a tip, why should you get one, ya know?

We had a horrible waiter a few months ago. Just horrible. Forgot about us at times, never checked up on us and the food was just wrong. So we barely tipped him. He kind of gave my fiance a look when he saw how little of a tip he got and so we explained. He said that it wasn't his fault that the food was bad, that he doesn't make the food. True, but it's his reponsibility to look at it and realize, "hey that steak is solid and black, maybe I shouldn't serve it to them".

I also hate tipping though - I always feel like I'm giving too little.
post #12 of 23
Now Brendan is the kind of person you want at your table if you're in the food industry! I've never known anyone to tip like him!!! If he's really happy with the service he'll give WAY above the necessary tip amount. He's been known to give 200% tip. Seriously. Once he gave a $10 tip for a $5 bill when we had just gone in to have a dessert with some friends. If he likes you, he makes sure you're well rewarded.

However the opposite is also true. If he thinks you were terrible at your job or were just rude he leaves a really, really low amount. I think once we even left without giving a tip at all. Just goes to show that it pays to be polite and go that extra mile. After all, for most of those people the tips are their well being, why would they be unnecessarily rude to customers who aren't even giving them a hard time?
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick_kitten
i feel uncomfortable with the whole tipping culture as i'm never to sure how much to give.

i also feel really resentful that we are expected to tip certain people on top of an already high bill in some industies but not others. eg. yes in a restuarant but no in mcdonalds or in a shoe shop
I agree. They set their prices and that's all that I'm going to pay. If they can not live on their price then they need to adjust their pricing. I had my hair done the other day, I got a highlight and a cut (I never do any color).....my bill was $90!! I thought that was outrageous. I did not tip. I never do.
When I get my hair cut it's $25 - it only takes 30 min., they are making $100 per hour. Have any of you thought of it that way?

I only tip waiters and bell hops. I think that it's going to far. Soon, we're going to be tipping everyone!

I'm a photographer - that's a service industry - should I receive tips?
post #14 of 23
I think 20% is accurate for good service. I tend to over-tip after being in the bar/restaurant business for 19 years (BTW - happy to say I've been out for about 10 years).

Tipping reminds me of a funny story:
Years ago, a Taco Bell opened in my brother's town. The cashier put a paper cup on the counter so my brother could fill his own soda. He had no idea thats what it was for and thought that was her way of hinting for a tip, so he put a dollar in it!
post #15 of 23
Tipping is very city and location specific. There are some countries where one does not tip. Or it is reserved for a top class service and even then it is represented by a symbolic tip of a small sum. But for other places, it depends, with the range between 10 to 15 (most commone) up to even 20%. Generally it seems that in larger cities such as New York, London or Toronto the standard tip is 15% but outside of the city it may drop to 10%. But the 10% thing seems more like Europe than in N.America. Also for services, where you do not pay directly, like the person who carries your luggage a tip of a dollar or two. BUT that is because I usually only have one bag.

The best advice I can give you is something I discovered in college, when I was fresh and new to the city. Simply ask the person how much should you tip. Ask and ye shall receive, is the mantra to live by. Once you ask once or twice the standard is usually the same in the city. FURTHERMORE, there is a chance the hair-dresser may even waive the tip because he believe that me (as a student then) should not tip until I start work, which is really nice. So I kept going back to that hair-dresser. Also the service provider would not complain since after all they did give the advice. Bear in mind the possibility of one of them asking for a really high and ridiculous tip but that have yet to occur to me.

Another question to consider is, should you tip above the tax or not. Meaning is the 15% placed on the cost of the meal only or is it placed on the cost of the meal PLUS tax (if tax is applicable).

One final point to note is this. Why is tipping prevalent in only certain industries? I mean you do not tip your doctor or lawyer. The most interesting incident occured when I was in a checkout line and saw this couple who was not local trying to tip the cashier, which she rejected but was mightly pleased.

PS: I seem to have quite a bit to say on tipping not because it is a subject that interests me but rather it is a result of me asking the service provider how much should I tip. And the responses I got as a result since many do not just tell you to tip a definite "X" amount. One even told me about the different schools of thought on whether should tax be included in the calculation.
post #16 of 23
It is weird, but I've worked in restaurants for years and the difference is that fast food employees and retail clerks earn something like a living wage, but servers make $2.50 an hour and we rely on tips to live on and pay the bills. I think if you haven't worked in a restaurant this isn't clear, so people feel it's ok to tip 10% when the standard is at least 15%. I always overtip, even with mediocre service, because I know what it's like to wait on 6 people for two and a half hours who demand everything, take up a large table, are rude the entire time, and then leave $30 bucks on a $350 tab. I know not everyone is like that, but it does happen. Imagine working all day and making half of what you're normally paid for the same amount of work. Whoa...sorry for the rant!
post #17 of 23
I've never worked as a waitress, but my sister does and I've heard that you have to report something like 11% of your sales as additional income (tips). And so if your constantly getting less than that you really get screwed! Because tips are such a large part of waiters/waitresses income the government makes sure they pay taxes on it.
post #18 of 23
First let me say I'm a good tipper 20% to 50% and on special ocassions more than 100% when it is warranted. However if I get bad service then the tip goes down and has been known to be down to nothing. Sorry but tip is earned, if I wind up eating cold food at a resturaunt or sitting with an empty glass for an extended amount of time then the tip amount is going to reflect that. Also I have had some very rude servers that detracts from tip amount as well. Thankfully at most resturaunt I go to them know me and make special effort due to my tipping history.

As far as the hair dresser goes, it depends greatly on how good a job is done. I'm currently looking for a stylist as mine moved out of town and the last girl that cut my hair did a horrible job, I literally went home and trimmed up the areas that still needed it. She got no tip but if the cut is good then I leave around 20%.
post #19 of 23
Did anyone watch that comedy Third Rock from the Sun.

There is this scene in one episode where the guy "revolutionised" the tipping method. He tells the waiter that the Pile of $1 notes on the table represents the potential amount of tip. And whenever the waiter does something good, he will add to it and when the waiter does something bad, he will remove from the pile. It was so funny.
post #20 of 23
Some of you may have already heard this, but my husband, daughter and I were in a restaurant one day for dinner (it was my treat which the waitress had no way of knowing). My husband is a pretty attractive fellow, and this waitress made sure he had everything he wanted, when he wanted and pretty much ignored the fact that my empty place was not removed and that I had to ask for MY dessert, coffee more than once, etc., etc.

I was seething let me tell you. At any rate, when she brought the bill to our table, my husband passed it to me and said, Thanks honey for treating us! Her face almost fell to the floor. She did NOT get a tip - not one cent and before we left I called her to the table and calmly explained why she did not get a tip in the hopes that next time she will be smarter.
post #21 of 23
Thread Starter 
wow, so the consensus is pretty much %15-%20... so i guess i am okay... thanks for all the info!

the same girl does everything from washing, cutting, coloring, waxing, so she gets all the tip and she does the best job i have ever had anyone do on my hair... so maybe i will start giving her a little more!

now, next time i tip her, i wont feel like i have absolutley no idea what i am doing
post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpy
Did anyone watch that comedy Third Rock from the Sun.

There is this scene in one episode where the guy "revolutionised" the tipping method. He tells the waiter that the Pile of $1 notes on the table represents the potential amount of tip. And whenever the waiter does something good, he will add to it and when the waiter does something bad, he will remove from the pile. It was so funny.
My fiance's uncle or something does something similar (but without putting the money on the table). Everytime the waiter does something wrong (if he has to ask for something, if has to find the waiter, etc) then he deducts money from the tip. Kinda makes sense.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
Some of you may have already heard this, but my husband, daughter and I were in a restaurant one day for dinner (it was my treat which the waitress had no way of knowing). My husband is a pretty attractive fellow, and this waitress made sure he had everything he wanted, when he wanted and pretty much ignored the fact that my empty place was not removed and that I had to ask for MY dessert, coffee more than once, etc., etc.

I was seething let me tell you. At any rate, when she brought the bill to our table, my husband passed it to me and said, Thanks honey for treating us! Her face almost fell to the floor. She did NOT get a tip - not one cent and before we left I called her to the table and calmly explained why she did not get a tip in the hopes that next time she will be smarter.
I haven't heard that story before. How did the waitress take the explanation? And you're husband is in your signature, right? If so, yes, he's pretty attractive, lucky you...
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