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post #31 of 55
Yeah, it is a fun book! I would certainly recommend it as a far less intimidating introduction to esoteric philosophy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom of Franz
A book that is a great primer on philosophy is a novel, called Sophie's World (get it) It's a fun book, and the only novel that I know of that has an index! Can't recall the author offhand, and I'm too lazy right now to look it up..I believe the author is Norwegian.
post #32 of 55
My man Karl is kicking ASS in the poll!
post #33 of 55
Nietzsche.

Heinlein is good too. (http://www.geocities.com/fleembit/qu...arus_Long.html)

My boyfriend is a Philosophy Grad Student - the house is FULL of Philosophy books. Right now, his classes are focused on Nietzsche and C.S. Peirce.
post #34 of 55
Robert A. Heinlein... the extemely prolific sci-fi genius. I bet you just like him because he obviously displays a fondness for the feline purrsuasion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylent Rayne
Nietzsche.

Heinlein is good too. (http://www.geocities.com/fleembit/qu...arus_Long.html)

My boyfriend is a Philosophy Grad Student - the house is FULL of Philosophy books. Right now, his classes are focused on Nietzsche and C.S. Peirce.
post #35 of 55
*laughing* To be quite honest I don't know much about him. I've read a little, those quotes, and that's about it. I do like what I have read so far.

I am actually new to the Philosophy scene though I'm very Philosophical. I just have never truly been inspired to read Philosophers.
post #36 of 55
Do you like Poe?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylent Rayne
*laughing* To be quite honest I don't know much about him. I've read a little, those quotes, and that's about it. I do like what I have read so far.

I am actually new to the Philosophy scene though I'm very Philosophical. I just have never truly been inspired to read Philosophers.
post #37 of 55
Some of his works. Speaking of authors -- I am actually partial to Herr Hesse. He's influenced by Nietzsche and I find his writings to be quite remarkable.
post #38 of 55
Yes, I've been meaning to pick up something by Hermann Hesse... someone who knows me well thinks I would like his stuff. Thanks for the reminder.

Though if he's strongly influenced by Nietzsche, I don't know how much he would appeal to me. Though I certainly give him a shot. As you may or may not have read earlier in the thread, I'm not big on Existentialism.

In fact, the only author I truly appreciate who smacks of Existentialim is De Beauvoir, and I'm pissed because she is a fantastic philospher/writer whose ideas should have been able to stand on their own merit, rather than continuously being paired with J.P. Sartre's. Infuriating!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sylent Rayne
Some of his works. Speaking of authors -- I am actually partial to Herr Hesse. He's influenced by Nietzsche and I find his writings to be quite remarkable.
post #39 of 55
I wouldn't say he's strongly influenced, no. He does subscribe to the theory of Self and it is through Self that we can live. Siddhartha, Demian, Steppenwolf all have that aspect to it...Suffering to achieve Self. Out of those three, I prefered Steppenwolf, then Siddhartha, then Demian being last. I really want to read (the title is eluding me) but the one about the Priests...
post #40 of 55
You don't necessarily have to be goth to get a lot out of Nietzche. I got into Nietzche because an ex-girlfriend liked him (weird, I know) and I wanted to have something to talk to her about. I think it's passage 122 in Beyond Good and Evil that made me a better photographer.

The Big Three, of course, but Plato's my favorite of them. I'm only slightly dissapointed that I'm not in Cincinnati at the moment because my favorite professor in the philosophy department is teaching a class on Plato for spring quarter. Oh well, I'll just have to make do with being in Italy.

Rousseau is by far my favorite 'social' philosopher (Sociology hadn't been "invented" yet). I love Emile. I saw a first run copy of his Discourse on the Origin of Inequality at a rare book shop here in town, and if the book next to it wouldn't have been two thousand Euro, then I would have at least asked how much it cost.

I changed my major about four and a half years into an engineering program (aerospace = rocket science) to a dual sociology and philosophy major. I'm gonna be a Sociphosipher!
post #41 of 55
Quote:
The Big Three, of course, but Plato's my favorite of them.
Funny thing to me about Plato, people act like Republic is such a revolutionary idea, but if you break it down to simple terms, his idea was basically:

1: put me in charge
2: everyone else needs to shut up and do their work

and I just can't see why nobody thinks this is kind of silly...
post #42 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianlojeck
Funny thing to me about Plato, people act like Republic is such a revolutionary idea, but if you break it down to simple terms, his idea was basically:

1: put me in charge
2: everyone else needs to shut up and do their work

and I just can't see why nobody thinks this is kind of silly...
The short reply, in interets of not derailing this thread is as follows:

1) I'm more a fan of his ideas on love and friendship, The Symposium comes to mind first, but also The Republic.

2) It's not like Aristotle's ideas of biology in De Anima were much better than your take on Plato's idea of government in The Republic.
post #43 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikenealis
.......
The Big Three, of course, but Plato's my favorite of them. I'm only slightly dissapointed that I'm not in Cincinnati at the moment because my favorite professor in the philosophy department is teaching a class on Plato for spring quarter. Oh well, I'll just have to make do with being in Italy.
......

I changed my major about four and a half years into an engineering program (aerospace = rocket science) to a dual sociology and philosophy major. I'm gonna be a Sociphosipher!

Italy. Man, that's pretty rough.
I think I will undoubtedly turn out like my father predicted....superficial....a Sophist to the core!
post #44 of 55
Elizabeth, I think it's wonderful that you made it to college at 31.

When I was a teenager, it took a LOT of discipline for me to actually finish high school, as I've been on my own since I was 16. Though I went directly on to college after, I wish I would have held off for a while. Seems like we may have had some similar life experiences...

Personally, I think there is often too much pressure on kids to learn so intensely at such a young age (perhaps that explains the relatively high suicide rates among youth?). And I don't believe the theory that our capacity to learn is at it's peak during childhood. I think we just lose touch (and understandably so) with the wonder that childhood brings. The complexities of modern life are a bitch.

I'm a believer in experiencing all life can bring, and in any form, whether it be learning to think critically in order to appreciate the written word, gaining wisdom through facing hardship or in welcoming challenge, or by appreciating the little things in life, such as having a roof over your head, food on the table and the simple joy in sharing those comforts with a feline companion!

Far too often we get caught up in the superficial and monetary aspects of life, that we often lose ourselves, become numb, and therefore experience little or no meaning or purpose in the process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sashacat421
Heavens! Required reading --YUK! I graduated second to last in my high school because I never went. I preferred to "experience life" at age 17 instead of a classroom. I didn't go to gollege until I was 31! But.....having said that (there IS a category for you, did you see? ) I will say that marshaling all my resources, whether they be the clues and power of the natural world, books, visuals, art, or just plain livin', has allowed me to make up my own mind about how to think and look at humanity and the powerful questions that plague us.
post #45 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by sashacat421
Italy. Man, that's pretty rough.
I think I will undoubtedly turn out like my father predicted....superficial....a Sophist to the core!
Yeah, didn't quite know how to get the sarcasm on that across, glad someone got it. Sophists weren't all superficial, they just taught people what they wanted to know - how to win arguments (for the most part). Socrates' beef with them was that they took money for what they did. I think it's Penguin Classics that just last year released a collection of the Sophists' works. It's a pretty good read, if you're into that.
post #46 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikenealis
2) It's not like Aristotle's ideas of biology in De Anima were much better than your take on Plato's idea of government in The Republic.
ouch. Philopher's Burn...

I don't think I'm as far off as you think. I may not have captured the purest essence of his utopian designs for society, but if you boil it down, his idea of the three parts of society were:

1: people to do
2: people to fight
3: people to rule

those with skills (cobblers, welders, etc...) did what they do, those who were brave became soldiers, and the smartest went to school and become philosophers, at which point they could rule. (the idea of them living life in the other "jobs" of socity is a good one, I'll admit).

Plato putting philopher's in charge is like an attorney deciding that you should need a law degree to be president. We all think we, or someone very like us, really "see how to fix things". The only difference is, when I say that, nobody reads about it in school. ;-)
post #47 of 55
I voted forSocrates but I hear Sartre was a kick in the pants at parties
post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianlojeck
The only difference is, when I say that, nobody reads about it in school. ;-)
No one really reads what I write either. You'll have that.
post #49 of 55
Okay, everyone's going to have to be quiet for a bit...I'm trying to recalculate my IQ. I thought it was a pretty respectable number, but after reading this thread, I'm not so sure. I'm not even sure it breaks the 100 mark!

While reading this thread, I've been doing a lot of this:

...and some of this:

...but mostly this:
post #50 of 55
Clixpix, don't think that way. Philosophy isn't something that's hard to understand. You just need to understand that whatever it is that you're reading isn't the say-all-end-all of everything. It's just some guy's ideas. Usually they're dead guys' ideas. Really really dead guys. For me, the thing I love most about it is it challenges my views on the world, and forces me to step back from my comfort zone to get a look at things.

Besides, the first time I ran logic circles around my friends that were still in engineering was grand fun (does anyone else see that as somewhat strange? The philosopher running circles around engineers using logic?). As was "proving" to them that they don't exist.

I'm sure there's volumes that you know, and hundreds of things that you can do, that I have absolutely no clue what about at all. To me, philosophy is like the arts. Sure, I love getting dressed up to go to an opera or the symphony, but the arts should be open to everyone and not have a dress code. It does my heart good to see people coming Music Hall in denim. Think of philosophy like that. It's not big and scary, it's just regular knowledge and questions dressed in a suit. With a really nice tie.
post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by brianlojeck
or, as another great philosopher (Ash from Army Of Darkness) put it:

"Good? Bad? I'm the guy with the gun."
How did I miss this?!?

"Alright, you primitive screw-heads, listen up...."
post #52 of 55
Wow, this thread takes me back! I guess somebody voted in order for it to resurface...
post #53 of 55
Personally I tend to think more along the lines of Lazarus long and Robert Heinlein.
"Don't try to teach a pig to whistle, it wastes your time and annoys the pig."
post #54 of 55
Thread Starter 
OMG! Who resurrected this thing?????
post #55 of 55
Sartre and existentialism just fascinate me, but as my mom says, everyone is an existentialist when they're in college.

Go figure, right?
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