TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › ? for those who garden
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

? for those who garden

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm wanting to plant a fast growing tree in my yard. I've been all over the net and can't seem to find a site showing at what rate different kinds of trees grow.

I want to research trees to find one that grows quickly, flowers and will thrive in south Louisiana. Then, I'll go to a local nursery and pick it up.

Any of you know of a site that will show how tall a tree should be at say 5 yrs?

I'm especially interested in Bing Cherry Trees!
post #2 of 16
Check out Bradford Pear trees - they seem to grow quite quickly, are a lovely shaped tree and filled with spectacular white blossoms at this time of year.

Crepe Myrtle are also lovely and there are quite a few varieties. Birch trees and aspen also grow very fast, but they don't flower. I would suggest talking to someone at your local nursery about the growth rate of trees and they would be able to give you both a good idea and show you a sample.

I love this time of year here with all of the trees beginning to blossom - it is quite spectacular - especially the cherries and the tuliptree/magnolias.

Kathryn
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks Kathryn!

I didn't want to go with a Magnolia tree because they are sooooo messy! I've had one before and just couldn't stand those huge leaves!

The pear tree sounds quite interesting. I'm going to see if I can find a pic. on the net!

Thanks again!
post #4 of 16
Just remember that in most cases trees that grow quickly also die quickly. Poplars can reach full height in 5 years, but will generally only live for 20 or 30 years.
post #5 of 16
Cat, being formerly from southern Maryland, and the resident tree nut around here, I can honestly say that the Oak tree does wonderfully well in the south and grows like a racehorse out of the gate. After year 7, growth tempers quite a bit and they live forever. They are grea tiny our climate and as long as you don't put it in a bog, it will do great. Start with a 7-9 ft for the healthiest chances. It just doesn't flower. Flowering trees grow more rapidly than others but are also more temperamental. The Japanese cherry tree would be a great choice. Kathryn's advice was most excellent, too!
post #6 of 16
i thought treees take years to grow and that you should go to a gardening store to get the tree you want and plant it.?
but im not america so i dunno!
just talking from australian experience!
post #7 of 16
In general, soft wood trees grow faster than hard woods. Maples, Sweet Gum and Pines are soft woods. Oaks and some nut trees are typically hard woods.

I have Bradford pears and they have grown fast, but I didn't think that they did well in the south. I planted a bunch of small oak trees about 10 years ago and some of them aren't even waste high yet. Your best bet would be to visit a reputable nursery and ask. If their prices are high, find out which kinds do best then visit a discount nursery to purchase.
post #8 of 16
http://www.gardenweb.com

If it isn't there, do a search for gardenweb.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany
In general, soft wood trees grow faster than hard woods. Maples, Sweet Gum and Pines are soft woods. Oaks and some nut trees are typically hard woods.

I have Bradford pears and they have grown fast, but I didn't think that they did well in the south. I planted a bunch of small oak trees about 10 years ago and some of them aren't even waste high yet. Your best bet would be to visit a reputable nursery and ask. If their prices are high, find out which kinds do best then visit a discount nursery to purchase.
I believe Maple is a hard wood as is Cherry.
post #10 of 16
I get confused on soft woods versus hard woods. The silver maples in our area are fairly soft and grow fast, but I know that sugar maples grow a lot slower. We planted about 1000 trees on our property after we moved here and even with that experience, I always ask the folks at the nursery on what grows best in our area.
post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
I believe Maple is a hard wood as is Cherry.
Having worked for a short while in a lumber mill, I can tell you that Maple, Poplar and Cherry are all considered hardwoods, but they're the softest of the hardwoods. I can't grow em for the life of me, but I sure know a thing or two about killing and dismembering them
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicaLynn
Having worked for a short while in a lumber mill, I can tell you that Maple, Poplar and Cherry are all considered hardwoods, but they're the softest of the hardwoods. I can't grow em for the life of me, but I sure know a thing or two about killing and dismembering them
I guess up here in Canada they gotta be harder to survive.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for the advice!

I'm looking for a fast growing tree because I know that we are going to be moving within the next 3 yrs at the most and I think that my home will sell better with "established" trees.

E-
Oak trees around here are HUGE! We have 2 in the back and while being very shady, it's also a mud pit beneath it! Grass will not grow around oak trees. I don't want that in the front yard. It looks horrible to me. If the oaks that we have wouldn't be so old, I probably would have cut those down. The trees themselves are beautiful but they do have several draw backs down here. Oaks also pull the water from beneath your home and cause the foundation to crack. It's a huge poblem in the south.

I guess I'll just go by a nursery with a photo of the from of my house and see what they suggest.

Thanks again everyone!
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by catherine
E-
Oak trees around here are HUGE! We have 2 in the back and while being very shady, it's also a mud pit beneath it! Grass will not grow around oak trees. I don't want that in the front yard. It looks horrible to me. If the oaks that we have wouldn't be so old, I probably would have cut those down. The trees themselves are beautiful but they do have several draw backs down here. Oaks also pull the water from beneath your home and cause the foundation to crack. It's a huge poblem in the south.

I guess I'll just go by a nursery with a photo of the from of my house and see what they suggest.

Thanks again everyone!
True, true. I was thinkinhg of that with your climate and sea level (water tables) measure down there.... oak trees up here are somewhat different! I's still bank on a Japanese cherry and sell your house in the Spring! LOL.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
I guess up here in Canada they gotta be harder to survive.

They DO! Their outer level thickens and actually creates an insulation and adaptation to a northern climate.
post #16 of 16
If you want a really beautiful tree grow Kousa Dogwoods-beautiful flowers and Japanese Maples are awesome too. These do not grow in my area but should do well.
The only problem with fast growing trees are that they are weak wooded. What does that mean. They are subject to breakage are the wood isn't as strong. Think of it this way a tree could grow at 6" a year or 12" a year. The slower growing one will be a much stronger tree. For your state use this reference: www.lsuagcenter.com. This is the state's extension website and should have publications you are looking for. PM me if you need more info.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Cat Lounge
TheCatSite.com › Forums › General Forums › The Cat Lounge › ? for those who garden