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Calif. Veterinarians want right to declaw! - Page 2

post #31 of 59
When I was a kid we had a cat, Ashley, that was declawed. I don't remember her having any problems until later in her life she did urinate throughout the house, but she had kidney problems so that was unrelated.
When I found out I was getting Dori one of the first things I said was that she was going to get spayed and declawed. My fiance, who very much disliked cats at the time, said "absolutely not that's mean". I was suprised, but I didn't know anything about it except that my childhood cat was declawed. I researched on the internet and read a lot about it. I decided against it because 1. I didn't want Dori to go through the surgery for something that was not medically necessary and 2. There was absolutely no reason to have her declawed. When I scheduled Dori to be spayed they asked me "Would you like a declaw with your spay?". That made me so angry because they never even tried to discuss it with me at all. On top of that, the way they said it was much like at a fast food restaurant asking if I wanted fries with my burger. I truly believe that if people were educated on declawing and also about the alternatives and learned how to discourage cats fron scratching furniture and other belongings the number of cats being declawed would drop dramatically, much like in my situation where I was all set to declaw, but then was informed about it. I agree with Heidi's "educate and wait" policy 100%.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirque
Having the vet's tell their owners "Wait 3 months while I work with you to find ways to help you live with your cat's claws.. if we can't make it work I will do the surgery." would be a great thing for Vets to do.. yes!

However.. the person who owns the cat should still be open to say "Sorry, that won't work for me and my cat, I need you to do it now please. I understand the risks and I understand your going to take off part of his fingers with surgery." and then have the Vet do the declawing.
I never said 3 months. Even if it's just a few days or a week - enough time for the owners to really think about it with the information that the VET provided with a clear explanation of the procedure, statistics from real scientific studies of the possibility of side effects, and (MOST IMPORTANT) alternatives including even the simple steps of providing scratching posts and trimming the claws.

Perhaps you should re-read my posts. No where do I advocate banning. No where. Why bother to educate if there isn't a choice? Yes, of course, the decision would still be with the "owner" of their "property". I didn't say anything to indicate otherwise.

I'm really not talking about something unreasonable that responsible vets and clinics don't already do. Like Meaghan's clinic, for example.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr.Doolittle
In my two and a half years there we have performed only TWO medically unnecessary declaws, ONE ear crop and a handful of taildocks. We are a very busy practice but when it comes to procedures like these we educate the client first and foremost and often times the client changes their mind.
They educate, and most clients who are educated change their mind. They don't treat cosmetic surgery (which is essentially what declawing is) as a routine procedure, as in Tanya's case, my case, Ariana's case, and many more people I have seen here. It shouldn't be offered like french fries with a hamburger - but it is at many clinics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirque
Instead we have a chance of hearing the vet coming back with "Oh I was just informed, they just passed a Ban today.. sorry, I cannot do your cat's claws or I will go to jail or pay fines or loose my vet license."

Give me liberty or give me death! I would rather not die.. so I hope to keep my freedom and liberty intact.
Come on, scare tactics? The wheels of legislature grind slowly. No one who lived there was surprised or caught off guard when West Hollywood passed that law, which incidently only encompasses 3 veterinary clinics. Laws take months and months to get passed, and every vet in the area would know about it well in advance. Also remember, West Hollywood is one of the most liberal areas in the country, and they are the only place so far to pass a ban on declawing domestics. Even if banning were in the realm of possibility nationwide, or even statewide in ANY state, it would take months at least to even get it on the ballot, let alone get it passed. Realistically, there is no way on earth that declawing will be banned in the US in my lifetime as far as I can tell. Which is also why I think and Educate and Wait plan is much better to advocate - that has a realistic chance of being implimented.
post #33 of 59
I'm going to have to agree with Spotz on the declawing thing. Let the owners deside if it is right for thier cat. Each cat is different, some just don't like to scratch the sctatching post. If your cat is an indoor only cat, why shoudn't you be able to consider it?? If delcawing was not an option, it think some cats would be given up b/c they have a scratching problem. That leads to more cats in shelters or abandoned on the streets. I think it is say to say that no one here wants to see that. Limerick is not delcawed. His scratching is not a problem. My boyfriend's cats are. They are 10 and 9 years old, indoor only, cats. Sara loves to attack her daughter Kiki, so they got them declawed, a long time ago, to minimize the damage they can do to each other. They don't bite each other just yeowl and hit. They still fight, but now tehy can't kill each other.
If you are considering declawing, learn as much as you can. Ask the vet ANY AND ALL questions and concerns you may have. there are many books and web sites that will have the information you need. I'd stick with sites from vets and vet programs and things like that.
post #34 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfpint
After what I read and have seen there is no way for my cats, I even saw a article about the big cats how it effects them and causes problems when they get older,It even effects the way they are able to walk, let alone the mental part, plus If I have to give my cats dope for pain for several days, No way. Maybe if they would let everyone gather around during this procedure and follow up for however long, then they wouldn't like it to much, If it's some that is medically needed that might be differant..
Been there done it.

Many times, many felid speices.

Never once an issue, and with exception to roughly 12-18 hrs post op, the kitties are not in any behaviorial sense "doped" up.

The only way declawing will ever cause long term pain/suffering is if it's done wrong. Arthritis is about the only condition that shows a slightly higher rate of occurrance in OLDER declawed animals, and even then the statistical difference is questionably significant.

Learn the facts, explore the alternatives, and only as needed, make the choice to declaw.

Spotz
post #35 of 59
I agree with Valanhb. There are many very irresposible pet hospitals out there, and trust me, declawing is not their ony issue.
Perhaps this type of legislation should come from within the veterinary community. Like the AVMA or CVMA (American/Canadian Veterinary Medical Association) If they imposed stricter regulations and a general stance against the procedure perhaps more clinics would take resposible actions. Of course the associations would need to beef up enforcement of these regulations and as of right now I can tell you that enforcement is poor (at least in my area). There are still plenty of clinics practicing and performing surgery without anaesthetic machines! How is that even possible?
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Doolittle
Coming from the perspective of someone who has worked in a high volume/high euth rate shelter and a vet hospital I feel that banning declaws would be the wrong thing to do.

...

Declawing should not be a widely accepted practice.

...

The fact is that if a person wants it done badly enough they will have it done SOMEWHERE (in the case of some "breeders" the basement or backyard) and we would rather be the ones to do it so we can ensure the animal is safe and painfree.

I understand that not all clinics practice this way and maybe some laws should be in place to standardize vet clinics but ultimately I would rather see a cat declawed responsibly than surrendered.

Edited to add:
Spotz and Amber- I have no experience with exotic cats so I didn't mention it. I imagine that the issues with these cats are different (safety?) and I didn't mean to lump either of you in with my 2 categories above.
Great post Dr Doolittle No offense taken here at all, and I'd be proud to be lumped into the second group there....the declaw as a last ditch effort before either confining the animal in a "safe room" or even rehoming it.

The theory is a bit different with the exotics, but even then they are similar to domestics in that most of these animals can also be trained to not use them. The issue for the difference in theory is primarly for safety, mutual after a fashion. The safety issue is not for an animal that is relaxed or similarly happy and comfortable, but rather for the rare occassion when the animal is distressed. Even the kindest, gentlest, most unaggressive common cat can become a major hazard when they get stressed. If they are injured or choking on something for example, their state of mind will shift and they will generally percieve anything as a threat. The instinct is to defend. Trying to help an animal under such duress is not easy when you only have to worry about the mouth, but it becomes magnitudes more difficult when you add in the claws also. [One of the reasons I firmly believe in routine nail trimming as a bare minimum] With a domestic you can usually don heavy gloves and just overpower the animal, not so easy with the larger species.

Declawing in this sense offers a little more advantage to an exotic than the procedure does for the common cat. By no means though does that mean that it is impossible or uncommon to find these animals fully clawed, so nevertheless declawing is highly optional, and only somewhat "more necessary".

I'm sure working at a vet clinic, you've had some experience with a fully clawed, freaked out defensive cat. [not an argument for declawing, just a relation] It's not an easy situation to deal with until you manage to calm the animal down some.

Got off on a little tangent there...

Again, Great post,

Spotz
ps Apologies for trimming the quote, PM me if you want me to modify it any, I was just trying to keep it succinct.
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr. Doolittle
I agree with Valanhb. There are many very irresposible pet hospitals out there, and trust me, declawing is not their ony issue.
Perhaps this type of legislation should come from within the veterinary community. Like the AVMA or CVMA (American/Canadian Veterinary Medical Association) If they imposed stricter regulations and a general stance against the procedure perhaps more clinics would take resposible actions. Of course the associations would need to beef up enforcement of these regulations and as of right now I can tell you that enforcement is poor (at least in my area). There are still plenty of clinics practicing and performing surgery without anaesthetic machines! How is that even possible?
Sadly I also agree that there are too many "bad" vets out there...but then again, in my book, one "bad" vet IS too many.

I've said it in the past, that I would really like to see a certification or similar be required for veterinarians by their respective organizations. Declawing is a simple procedure, one which is often over simplified to the point that the patient isn't the first priority, $$$ and Time are. Tenectomies, or other "methods" of declawing beyond total removal of the third phalange, are at best flawed practices. But so is removing anything more than the third phalange. The operation is simple, done properly it takes 20-30 minutes [four paw]. I've heard of vets that brag about being able to do 6-7 declaws an hour....all I can say is they aren't doing it right. Even worse though, if they are willing to cut corners on a surgical procedure, even one as simple as declawing, they are cutting corners other places too. In the end, the animals are the ones that pay the heaviest price.

I would be opposed to governmental legislation which severely restricts or removes any freedom without irrefutable factual evidence that the restriction is warranted. Seeing that all veterinarians are required to be certified, I would like to see a specific certification [specialization is perhaps the better term] for declawing. And a much more stringent internal regulation within the veterinary community. A specialization which requires a veterinarian to demonstrate a level of profieciency with performing the procedure in a proper fashion, which requires a veterinarian to at the bare minimum make sure the client understands what is involved with the procedure and that requires a veterinarian cover the basics alternatives to the procedure. I would strongly be against a mandatory wait period though.

Bottom line here being that the general public should not be the group making medical decisions for trained professionals.

Spotz
post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
...

Come on, scare tactics? The wheels of legislature grind slowly. No one who lived there was surprised or caught off guard when West Hollywood passed that law, which incidently only encompasses 3 veterinary clinics. Laws take months and months to get passed, and every vet in the area would know about it well in advance. Also remember, West Hollywood is one of the most liberal areas in the country, and they are the only place so far to pass a ban on declawing domestics. Even if banning were in the realm of possibility nationwide, or even statewide in ANY state, it would take months at least to even get it on the ballot, let alone get it passed. Realistically, there is no way on earth that declawing will be banned in the US in my lifetime as far as I can tell. Which is also why I think and Educate and Wait plan is much better to advocate - that has a realistic chance of being implimented.
Different topic I know, but the example is relative. Did you ever expect the Assault Weapons Ban? IIRC, that was a nationwide event, one pushed into existance and passed just as quickly by what can only be considered Scare Tactics. Remember when the ban was reaching the point of expiring...were there no scare tactics used to try and raise an overwhelming public outcry?

The examples given by most sources were of weapons not even affected by the ban. The average citizen didn't even know what the ban really did, but because it was called the "Assault Weapons Ban" nobody really questioned it...after all Assault Weapons have to be bad. AK47s, M16s were just a few examples given....quite misleading, and without question, merely a Scare Tactic, as these weapons were only slightly affected by the ban.

Declawing is quite similar. The message from almost every group set towards banning the procedure, is that declawing is undeniably cruel. The examples most frequently given would only be slightly affected by a ban on declawing. An improperly performed procedure will always be cruel, irregardless of the type of surgery performed. A botched spay is just as cruel as a botched declaw. Negative behaviorial changes due to improper declaws, are once again due to the fact that the procedure was botched. Indeed studies have been done by different veterinary organizations, and the link between declawing and negative behaviorial traits have never been clearly [or closely] related. The fact that the vast majority of declaws live long, happy, healthy lifes is not mentioned. Bans against declawing are being pushed heavily by Scare Tactics, not with facts. Groups like PETA are just some of the bigger organizations spreading fear rather than fact.

Scare Tactics are real and present, not just on declawing, but on almost every single peice of legislation these days.

Spotz
post #39 of 59
Scare Tactics are used widely by groups to push for bans against exotic animal ownership.
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotz
Seeing that all veterinarians are required to be certified, I would like to see a specific certification [specialization is perhaps the better term] for declawing. And a much more stringent internal regulation within the veterinary community. A specialization which requires a veterinarian to demonstrate a level of profieciency with performing the procedure in a proper fashion, which requires a veterinarian to at the bare minimum make sure the client understands what is involved with the procedure and that requires a veterinarian cover the basics alternatives to the procedure.
I was just going to say the same thing. I would also like to see regulations against veternarians. Unless they were specially licenced they would not be able to declaw. Of course, I think that the penalties for breaking these laws would have to be extreme to keep vets from just doing it under the table for money.



And to whoever suggested the manditory wait period - there's almost always a week's wait from the time you call the vet to the time they schedule the cat for surgery. It's not like a person can walk in off the street and say, "Here, declaw my cat now." What I'd like to see more vets do is to, at the least, send people home with reading material so that they'll be educated and can change their mind if they want to after learning more.
post #41 of 59
I must admit, that I must be very fortunate to have a excellent vet when it comes to the care of animals. For one, she takes care of my exotics, but that is not the main reason. If you make an apointment to have a cat spayed or neutered, they have never asked me if I was going to have the cat declawed. Second, I do not think they declaw cats over a certain age. I do believe they will only do it on kittens but not on adult cats. They do explain the surgery. My vet only uses laser surgery. There seems to be less pain and less chance of an infection afterwords. Most of her surgery is done by laser, even spay surgery. Yes, my bobcats have been declawed on the front, but all my other cats are not declawed, except for the one we adopted, she was already declawed by the previous owner. A bad divorce is what sent her to the shelter, not a behavior issue. The only reason we had the surgery on the bobcats was for safety only, not because I was worried about my furniture. The safety issue was the advice that was given to me by the breeder. As Spotz has stated, with a domestic, when things go wrong, they are much easier to handle. But with the larger cats, this is not the case. When I add another exotic to my family, I am not sure if I will have the declaw done. With the knowledge I have gained with regards to handling, I don't think it will be needed.
post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotz
Different topic I know, but the example is relative. Did you ever expect the Assault Weapons Ban? IIRC, that was a nationwide event, one pushed into existance and passed just as quickly by what can only be considered Scare Tactics. Remember when the ban was reaching the point of expiring...were there no scare tactics used to try and raise an overwhelming public outcry?
Being involved in a sport that was directly affected by the "Assault Weapons Ban", namely High Power Service Rifle competitive target shooting, I knew about the proposed law, what exactly was being banned, what aspects of the ban would directly affect us, what grandfather clauses would be enacted, what parts of our equipment would more difficult but not impossible to get, and what changes the manufacturers of our competition rifles would have to make. I knew all of this months before it was voted on. We knew which members of Congress were definitely going to vote for it, which would definitely vote against it, and which were undecided. While the average person who had no direct dealing with these types of rifles may not have known about it, the people who were affected by had plenty of "warning" so to speak.

On a more local piece of legislation, Colorado recently enacted some really stupid clauses to the Auto Insurance Laws that really restrict the care one can get that is covered by insurance after an accident, as pushed by the Insurance Companies. Earl's Chiropractor, who will be directly affected by this legislature, again knew about this months in advance and informed his clients (and everyone else he could) about what the legislation would entail.

So no, I don't think that one day a vet is going to say, "Surprise, I can't perform a declaw on your cat anymore and I had no idea this was coming."

I understand that the "other side" uses scare tactics, just as they did with both of the above examples of legislature. Just the term "assault rifle" has a negative connotation, and the people were promised "lower insurance rates" once it was passed - although rates actually went UP following the legislature. So all examples would probably be termed as bad laws. The point was that even though one side uses scare tactics doesn't mean that both sides should. People, particularly the people who post here, are smarter than most give them credit for. PETA to be sure uses scare tactics with everything they do, but most of the public realizes this and takes what they say with a large helping of salt.

I've done quite a bit of research on declawing for Stray Pet Advocacy, in particular to put together a non-biased pamphlet on declawing to educate people on the procedure but still be something that vet practices would feel comfortable handing to their clients (i.e. something that isn't all the hype from either side). Yes, we have big aspirations. It is nearly impossible to find any website that presents just the facts. Almost all are either totally for or totally against the procedure and present the facts selectively to support that view. Neither side is entirely blameless on this very hot issue of not using scare tactics, but it shouldn't be quite so blatent. Otherwise it's just the pot calling the kettle black.
post #43 of 59
Sixteen and a half yrs ago I fought my mom who wanted to get the cat ssdeclawed ... I lost and the cat still holds the paw at times... I think they dropped her or didnt anctitise enough... My new baby is not going to be declawed , she will go to the groomer every few weeks for a cut...
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharky
Sixteen and a half yrs ago I fought my mom who wanted to get the cat ssdeclawed ... I lost and the cat still holds the paw at times... I think they dropped her or didnt anctitise enough... My new baby is not going to be declawed , she will go to the groomer every few weeks for a cut...
Poor kitty. Thanks for not declawing your new baby!
post #45 of 59
What about California's bill to ban the declawing of exotic and native cats?
http://www.avar.org/declaw.html Was I imagining things, or did Schwarzenegger sign it a few weeks ago? Do you think that might have an effect on how people view declawing domestic cats?
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
So no, I don't think that one day a vet is going to say, "Surprise, I can't perform a declaw on your cat anymore and I had no idea this was coming."
Actually.. I said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirque
Instead we have a chance of hearing the vet coming back with "Oh I was just informed, they just passed a Ban today.. sorry, I cannot do your cat's claws or I will go to jail or pay fines or loose my vet license."
If "they just passed a Ban today" into law, then yes that vet would have to come back and tell the person that it cannot be done. I never said the vet would not see it coming. But you can bet, not every pet owner would know it was coming. Do you think I had any idea anyone was banning declawing until I started reading the threads here? -- Nope I sure did not. I have never heard of such a thing until I read about it here. How many people do NOT visit this website or similar sites and also would not know until it happened in their area?
post #47 of 59
I do not think declawing should be an alternative for "loving owners". If you and your household cannot accomodate an animal with claws, DON'T GET AN ANIMAL WITH CLAWS. Why not clip your cat's claws? I clip all four of mine every week, it's easy. What if your poor declawed cat escaped outside, how will he/she defend him/herself? Spaying/neutering improves a cat's quality of life. How does removing part of their appendages improve their quality of life? It doesn't.
post #48 of 59
Reading this I am reminded why I dislike declawing threads , they never lead anywhere but to war.
post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
Reading this I am reminded why I dislike declawing threads , they never lead anywhere but to war.
You said it. When I see such threads, I feel very lucky to live in an area where there's no longer any discussion about declawing, because it's banned.
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
Reading this I am reminded why I dislike declawing threads , they never lead anywhere but to war.
Hissy, if its any consolation, I believe that a lot more people would be getting cats declawed if it wasn't for the info found here.

For the record, as much as I would like to see declawing banned, I respect all of your opinions. No one here is saying that they LIKE declawing. We ALL LOVE cats. Some of us are saying its the lesser of 2 evils (euthanizing a cat vs. declawing). Although we are coming from different angles, we all agree that we need to do whatever we think is right to keep our kitties safe and well. I think the discussions do get heated, but it is out of love for our cats.
post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockcat
Hissy, if its any consolation, I believe that a lot more people would be getting cats declawed if it wasn't for the info found here.

For the record, as much as I would like to see declawing banned, I respect all of your opinions. No one here is saying that they LIKE declawing. We ALL LOVE cats. Some of us are saying its the lesser of 2 evils (euthanizing a cat vs. declawing). Although we are coming from different angles, we all agree that we need to do whatever we think is right to keep our kitties safe and well. I think the discussions do get heated, but it is out of love for our cats.
couldn't have said it better!
post #52 of 59
Thread Starter 
First of all, I would like to apologize to anyone who was upset or annoyed by the responses in this thread. Being relatively new to TCS, I did not realize what I was starting. That said, I would like to thank everyone who did respond. I read every post carefully, and even if I didn't agree totally, I respected them all. I have gained some great insight from both sides. I found a great website for my Favorites list (thank you, JCat! ) and read some very good insights (for example, posts by TNR1 & Valanhb & Amber the Bobcat, among many others) and above all, realized that these impassioned replies were thoughts & concerns for both animal rights & democratic rights. Pesonally, I welcome the discussion ( I did ask, "What do you think?", right?!), and am of the opinion that being in this thread is voluntary so anyone who is in here wants to be. Again, thank you all!! I know that this was all just a discussion, and if I ever needed cat advice, encouragement, etc. , I could turn to each & every one of you. That is what makes TCS such a great site - a few arched backs & hisses now & then, but purrs & strokes the rest of the time! You are all the BEST!!! Sincerely, Susan
post #53 of 59
Hey, us Bobcats can get moody at times
post #54 of 59
Thread Starter 
Amber, I like that - I was a Round Valley Bobcat when I was growing up!! Now, if I can just get my hubby to realize it!! hehe
post #55 of 59
however I'd like to see vets held accountable to be truthful about the procedure and teach about alternatives.

I doubt you ever will! IF it makes money - most Vets will do it! There are people (Vets and others) trying to push a bill through to make drug manufacturers tell the truth about what is in vaccinations and that the one year is REALLY a three year. It isn't happening, anymore than it is happening for Vets to tell people that they do not need to vaccinatinate indoor only cats and that all others need only be vaccinated every THREE years.

Vets lose too much money and Very few are willing to tell the truth!
post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
...

I've done quite a bit of research on declawing for Stray Pet Advocacy, in particular to put together a non-biased pamphlet on declawing to educate people on the procedure but still be something that vet practices would feel comfortable handing to their clients (i.e. something that isn't all the hype from either side). Yes, we have big aspirations. It is nearly impossible to find any website that presents just the facts. Almost all are either totally for or totally against the procedure and present the facts selectively to support that view. Neither side is entirely blameless on this very hot issue of not using scare tactics, but it shouldn't be quite so blatent. Otherwise it's just the pot calling the kettle black.
It's great to have fair warning...but when the minority of people are the ones properly informed, the majority is left to chance to make the right choice. Be it declawing, gun ownership, ownership of animals, or class size regulations. The theory behind the government was representation by educated individuals, individuals who would be able to do the research for the majority and who would write laws that benefit the majority. However, all to often now, laws are being written for the benefit of the minority [aka special interest groups]

I commend your efforts in attempting to create a neutral presentation of declawing in your brochures, it takes guts and a lot of effort. The whole truth is the best way to convey a message.

Declawing is rarely necessary, as there are plenty of highly effective alternatives, however when done right it is still a valid medical option.

Spotz
PS Would you please PM me sometime and tell me more about your efforts with stray pet advocacy?
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kellyyfaber
I do not think declawing should be an alternative for "loving owners". If you and your household cannot accomodate an animal with claws, DON'T GET AN ANIMAL WITH CLAWS. Why not clip your cat's claws? I clip all four of mine every week, it's easy. What if your poor declawed cat escaped outside, how will he/she defend him/herself? Spaying/neutering improves a cat's quality of life. How does removing part of their appendages improve their quality of life? It doesn't.
The same way they would defend themselves with trimmed claws, or covered claws. Cats don't need their claws to put up a very effective fight. Though, a slight concession is that at least after a period of time, the animals claws will grow back, and the nail caps will be removed, so I suppose if the cat gets out and is left out for a long time that the non-declawed animal has an advantage in this scenario. Most escaped cats return or are recaptured within a few days though, during these few days the nail modifications would hinder their ability to defend themselves with their claws, just the same as declawing would.

I suppose I don't really get the argument of "What if the cat escapes"...it's cheaper, easier, safer [and IMO smarter] to take the necessary precautions to prevent an escape. Different discussion, different topic, sorry.

Respectfully,

Spotz
post #58 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MyBabies
however I'd like to see vets held accountable to be truthful about the procedure and teach about alternatives.

I doubt you ever will! IF it makes money - most Vets will do it! There are people (Vets and others) trying to push a bill through to make drug manufacturers tell the truth about what is in vaccinations and that the one year is REALLY a three year. It isn't happening, anymore than it is happening for Vets to tell people that they do not need to vaccinatinate indoor only cats and that all others need only be vaccinated every THREE years.

Vets lose too much money and Very few are willing to tell the truth!
Very large exxageration, and a different topic in a sense, but my experience with numerous veterinarians [yes I get around some] has shown me that the bad ones are not so prevalent. Most of the feline vets are adopting the three year rotation of vaccinations, and there is still little evidence proving a benefit of no vaccinations versus routine vaccinations. Vaccinations are necessary, the only question is the frequency, and most veterinarians who are anywhere familiar with the concept are quickly adopting a three year rotation. Again, different topic, there is a thread around here about vaccinations.

So far, the easiest way I've found to judge a feline vet is to ask them about declawing. And to say I've been pleasantly surprised would be an understatment. So far the score card is something along the lines of 4 vets that discussed the procedure, and offered alternative choices as something to try first, 2 vets that discussed the procedure as a choice the owner could make, and 2 vets that didn't want to discuss it just were interested when they were going to perform the procedure. Most vets will openly discuss the procedure, though there are still those that definately push for it, plenty of speculative reasons there. Most of the time, the vets that push the one procedure are strong advocates of running all sorts of tests and giving every vaccination possible etc etc etc, without ever really going into any detail with the owner. I would never go to a doctor who isn't willing to entertain some questions, I'd be even more hesitant to see a doctor who seems to be in a hurry to be done with me. Why would I choose a vet that exhibits these traits...be it for declawing or anything else.

There are plenty of good veterinarians out there, and their pretty easy to find. Just ask them a few good questions, and see how they answer them. Declawing is a great topic to pick.

Spotz
post #59 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotz
So far, the easiest way I've found to judge a feline vet is to ask them about declawing. And to say I've been pleasantly surprised would be an understatment. So far the score card is something along the lines of 4 vets that discussed the procedure, and offered alternative choices as something to try first, 2 vets that discussed the procedure as a choice the owner could make, and 2 vets that didn't want to discuss it just were interested when they were going to perform the procedure. Most vets will openly discuss the procedure, though there are still those that definately push for it, plenty of speculative reasons there. Most of the time, the vets that push the one procedure are strong advocates of running all sorts of tests and giving every vaccination possible etc etc etc, without ever really going into any detail with the owner. I would never go to a doctor who isn't willing to entertain some questions, I'd be even more hesitant to see a doctor who seems to be in a hurry to be done with me. Why would I choose a vet that exhibits these traits...be it for declawing or anything else.
When I recently asked our vet about declawing Buddy (I figured if we got another cat we might as well get it declawed, but didn't) she informed us of all the various methods used to declaw.. and that she only wanted to use the best one although I seem to remember she would do another maybe in some cases. But basically steered us into the "best" choice possible for declawing, and although I do not remember her asking us to try to live without doing it or telling us other methods to prevent wanting a declaw done.. I don't fault her for it. She certianly did not push declawing on us in any way in the least. She did assure us that the cat would be treated extreamly well before, during and after the process and would feel minamal pain from the procedure and little stress before due to the drugs. All in all, to be frank, I would have done it if I had the money at the time to just toss away on something so needless. I do still consider it from time to time, for various reasons, but even if I had the money getting him declawed is so far down on my list it does not ever seem like it will become a reality. Cats claws really are not such bad things once you make friends with them.

However.. the freedom and the right to choose what to do with your own pets (without causing them to suffer to give you some kind of sick pleasure) is something noone should have to give up. I say freedom of choice is up to each person and always should be.
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