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Frequency of language

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
If cats had a language of their own, that they could communicate structurally, couldn't someone use a tone generator (a device that generates certain tones at certain frequencies) in order to duplicate the vocal patterns of the cats, resulting in communication with the cats?
post #2 of 17
That's a study I would like to see. I saw something simular with giraffes. They figured out what sounds could mean, like "where are you" and "something's coming" by which tone and ptich and when it was "made". It was really cool. So all you aminal science people might want to check that out for your masters or PH.D projects.

Tell me what my cat is thinking!!
post #3 of 17
It's true, you know, they can go and figure out how to clone cats, but are unable to still find a definative way of deciphering their sounds, for humans to actually communicate back with them.

If I were you , I'd have a patent on that idea!
post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by eburgess
So all you aminal science people might want to check that out for your masters or PH.D projects.

Tell me what my cat is thinking!!
Actually, DualOpAmp is my brother, and he is only in tenth.... no PH.D. is the near future. LOL! But, in the later future.... He's not actually that interested in animals.... he just joined this forum for the "Caption This" part of it! Never know, though.... he might just figure it out one day!
post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccoccocats
It's true, you know, they can go and figure out how to clone cats, but are unable to still find a definative way of deciphering their sounds, for humans to actually communicate back with them.

If I were you , I'd have a patent on that idea!

hmmmmm I just might

Isn't there a Simpsons episode where Homer's brother makes a machine that can tell you what your baby is saying???
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccoccocats
If I were you , I'd have a patent on that idea!
It takes thousands of dollars to have a lawyer search for a particuliar patent,
thousands more to create a prototype, ten thousand to market and other legallities. I'm apart of a middle income family, so that won't be happening. Besides that fact, I'm sure plenty of people have already thought of this idea. A cat's hearing can extend to 100,000 megahertz, that's 100, 000 cycles of a sine wave (the type of wave that sound is propegated in sound) per second. A human's ear can only recieve 20,000 - 30,00 megahertz, so the machine have to adjust our sounds to duplicate cat's language, this is all asuming cat's have a language, that would incorporate our everyday items or words.
post #7 of 17
Cat communication just plain isn't that simple, so the idea wouldn't work. Spend any amount of time with a cat and you will see that they communicate a great deal with their ears, eyes, tails, the way they position their bodies, even their fur. In feral colonies, most of them rarely vocalize. There are many domestic cats that rarely vocalize, while others vocalize a lot. But vocalization certainly isn't the cat's primary form of communication in the wild.

Cats have a very complex method of communication. Probably couldn't be called "language" in the human sense because they use so much more than vocal chords to express themselves.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DualOpAmp
It takes thousands of dollars to have a lawyer search for a particuliar patent,
thousands more to create a prototype, ten thousand to market and other legallities. I'm apart of a middle income family, so that won't be happening. Besides that fact, I'm sure plenty of people have already thought of this idea. A cat's hearing can extend to 100,000 megahertz, that's 100, 000 cycles of a sine wave. (the type of wave that sound is propegated in sound) A human's ear can only recieve 20,000 - 30,00 megahertz, so the machine have to adjust our sounds to duplicate cat's language, this is all asuming cat's have a language, that would incorporate our everyday items or words.
You are so knowledgable! That's so interesting what you wrote. I had meant it as a joke to patent the idea, it sounded so silly. But at least now I've learned something, thanks.
post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by DualOpAmp
It takes thousands of dollars to have a lawyer search for a particuliar patent,
thousands more to create a prototype, ten thousand to market and other legallities. I'm apart of a middle income family, so that won't be happening. Besides that fact, I'm sure plenty of people have already thought of this idea. A cat's hearing can extend to 100,000 megahertz, that's 100, 000 cycles of a sine wave. (the type of wave that sound is propegated in sound) A human's ear can only recieve 20,000 - 30,00 megahertz, so the machine have to adjust our sounds to duplicate cat's language, this is all asuming cat's have a language, that would incorporate our everyday items or words.
Can't take a joke can you
post #10 of 17
LOL! No, he can't! That's the way he is!

He's weird!
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ccoccocats
You are so knowledgable! That's so interesting what you wrote. I had meant it as a joke to patent the idea, it sounded so silly. But at least now I've learned something, thanks.
Well, thank you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DualOpAmp
A cat's hearing can extend to 100,000 megahertz, that's 100, 000 cycles of a sine wave(the type of wave that sound is propegated in sound) *edit* per second.
post #12 of 17
I know it when my cat says 'where are you"
But lately he has had a different meow and i think he is sick!
post #13 of 17
Actually, devices that "interpret" dogs' and cats' vocalizations are already on the market in Japan. How can you verify the results, though?
post #14 of 17
i learned in studying linguistics that every time we find that animals can do something we thought they couldn't via communication, we humans narrow the definition of language...so we can just keep it to ourselves. kind of says something about us humans. we also use lots of nonverbal communication, but we define that as separate from verbal language. we are so weird. also, i heard cats talk just to us cause we couldn't get their communication--we were too slow! don't know if that is true though. i swear to you, my siamese either once knew english or is trying her hardest to learn. she says "really?" and a whole bunch of other things. the other day she stuck her tongue in my ear when i was on the puter and gave me a wet willie. what the heck did that mean?? it did get my startled attention though, the little weiner!
post #15 of 17
My sixteen yr old talks softly cept for feeding time ... My Zoey on the other hand talks and talks ... they both understand alot...lol.. my dog understands english better than dog...
post #16 of 17
I agree with Heidi...there's far more to feline communication than simple vocal cord usage.

Pooping on the bed, flicking the tail as they walk away, chewing your head, blinking of eyes, whisker twiches, peeing on your leg, you know, all the things cats do to communicate to us.

See, they're really smart. Just ask Simon. He gets whatever he wants. He's polite enough to ask me first, but if I say no or misunderstand, he goes ahead and does what he wants.

He answers my cell and landline. He hangs out on the edge of the bathtub and discusses shampoo and water with me, cautioning me against too frequent encounters with water. He chats with me, tells me all about his day, and then procedes to nest on my neck, buried in my hair, purring a storm.

Oh sure, cats communicate with us regularly. We silly humans are too dense and stuck in the mud to understand their languages...because we use only one. Words. The joke, I fear, is on US! Just ask Simon.

Best-
Michele
post #17 of 17
that's great!!
i always used to think Pumpkin (a prior friend) was telling us about her dreams cause as soon as she would wake up she would start atalking and atalking nonstop as she was got off the bed and ran or walked out. and of course, i love pussinboots look in shrek, we used to call that the "big eye" look. who can resist that??
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