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We had to do it, we just had too

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
My beautiful girl Nakita is constantly getting out of the fence. Ken and I have repaired and repaired the fence so many times it is looking like a junk yard all down the fence row.

Today we installed an electric fence, I hope that it want hurt my babies too much This was the only option left for us to keep her safe. We have tried everything else from staking the fence down to putting acutal steel plates over the holes.

We live 4 houses down from a main highway, thankfully Nakita has always just hung around the house. But there is always that first time she could run off to do whatever, it would break my heart to come home from work and see her dead in the road

I feel bad about the shock that they will get but Ken has assured me that it isn't a real stong current that we have going through that box thingy. It is supposed to cut down on the 110 volts. Please send some vibes for my babies tonight cause I know she is going to get a surprise
post #2 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondiecat
My beautiful girl Nakita is constantly getting out of the fence. Ken and I have repaired and repaired the fence so many times it is looking like a junk yard all down the fence row.

Today we installed an electric fence, I hope that it want hurt my babies too much This was the only option left for us to keep her safe. We have tried everything else from staking the fence down to putting acutal steel plates over the holes.

We live 4 houses down from a main highway, thankfully Nakita has always just hung around the house. But there is always that first time she could run off to do whatever, it would break my heart to come home from work and see her dead in the road

I feel bad about the shock that they will get but Ken has assured me that it isn't a real stong current that we have going through that box thingy. It is supposed to cut down on the 110 volts. Please send some vibes for my babies tonight cause I know she is going to get a surprise
Have you tried an invisible fence? Burying it a few feet inside the perimeter of the existing fence to keep her from getting right up against the fence?

Spotz
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotz
Have you tried an invisible fence? Burying it a few feet inside the perimeter of the existing fence to keep her from getting right up against the fence?

Spotz
Where as we did want to try that the cost was more than we could afford. We have a huge back yard. They wanted $3000 to install it in our yard. Money wise this was our best option. I really hate that they are going to get a jolt but I hate more that she or the others could get out of the fence and try to fight with an 18 wheeler
post #4 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by blondiecat
Where as we did want to try that the cost was more than we could afford. We have a huge back yard. They wanted $3000 to install it in our yard. Money wise this was our best option. I really hate that they are going to get a jolt but I hate more that she or the others could get out of the fence and try to fight with an 18 wheeler
OH!

That makes great sense...if you have the fence adjusted right there's little to worry about. The controller makes sure that the shock is pulsed, and not constant That way the animal is very unlikely to get trapped in the fence, or worse yet be seriously injured.

Try and keep an eye on her as best you can, and if you see/hear her get jolted, go check on her and make sure she looks ok. After a few zaps she will most likely learn that the fence is not something she wants to mess with.

Don't feel too bad, it's for her protection.

Spotz
post #5 of 22
Hey Cathi - we had the same problem with ours when we had 5 dogs. They liked to dig out under it and we lived close to a busy highway. We put up the electric wire at the base of the fence and turned it on for 1 day. All 5 hit the wire that day, none were hurt, and the single jolt prevented them from ever getting that close to the fence again. We unplugged it the next day and didn't have to use it since. I felt so bad using it but it probably saved their lives.

I hope Nakita learns as quickly as mine did and you don't have to leave it on. I know that sometimes ours would play so hard that they would bump into the fence and I did not want to leave that thing turned on. Keep a close eye on all of yours the day you turn it on to see their reaction to it. If they don't experience the jolt, they haven't learned the lesson.
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Well two out of the 4 dogs have hit it. Both Dakota and Nakita seem to be fine just a little confused that the wire bit them. I am worried about Ceasar hitting it since he weighs about 10 lbs compared to the others 60-100 lbs. That box thingy has a pulse thing in there to so they can't get trapped on the wire and not get loose. Ceasar is really bad about getting out of the fence also.
post #7 of 22
We use the electric fence for the horses off of only the orchard so they don't get into the fruit trees, but when the dog hits it by accident, she goes yipping and screaming into the house she shakes for a few hours. But it is 15,000 volts-
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hissy
We use the electric fence for the horses off of only the orchard so they don't get into the fruit trees, but when the dog hits it by accident, she goes yipping and screaming into the house she shakes for a few hours. But it is 15,000 volts-
MaryAnne does that much voltage hurt them seriously? I am really upset about this fence but I didn't know what else to do to keep her in and safe from the trucks running about 70 when they go whizzing by our road. Ceasar I am afraid will be hurt the most since he is so small. But my Boo has to go outside to do his business none the less.
post #9 of 22
Well she has hit it a few times and been shaky afterward. Heck, I have hit it a few times and screamed like a banshee! It is not pleasant. I wonder if you have looked at other fencing companies. The only reason we use the electric fence is if the horse get into the orchards they would eat themselves sick of apples, pears and plums and grapes. Both of them would either founder, or colic- so it was a last resort. But horses are smart and they only have hit the fence a few times (unlike the dog). The horses do know the minute we turn the current off or when the fence is shorting out and they will go right to the edge of the orchard and lean into the fence to grab the harvest.

Hopefully your fence is lower voltage than ours?
post #10 of 22
I will send hugs and love and good vibes. You did the best thing!
post #11 of 22
post #12 of 22
Forgot to mention: if you see one of the dogs starting to lift his leg on the electric fence, stop him QUICK! Jethro did that, his pee hit the wire, and you know how fluids conduct electricity. Jethro was OK, but he learned the lesson the hardest.
post #13 of 22
It won't hurt, they will learn. Or they might be like my dog and find out that if you run real fast, it doesn't hurt too much.
post #14 of 22
If I recall correctly, it's amps, not volts that kill.
post #15 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deb25
If I recall correctly, it's amps, not volts that kill.
That is correct, however the two are related.

When Voltage goes up, the amps required to harm/kill you go down.
When Voltage goes down, the amps required to harm/kill go up.

Most electic fences operate on higher voltages, and relatively low amperages, they also have a pulse controller which keeps the shock to a short duration and then temporarily turns the fence off to give the animal a chance to get away.

The high voltage makes it easier for the electricity to be transferred, which is why most power lines are a much higher voltage (70,000+) and are so far apart and high up.

Spotz
post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Momofmany
Forgot to mention: if you see one of the dogs starting to lift his leg on the electric fence, stop him QUICK! Jethro did that, his pee hit the wire, and you know how fluids conduct electricity. Jethro was OK, but he learned the lesson the hardest.
I bet poor Jethro never wanted to hick his leg again, at least for awhile anyway. Thanks for that advice as I haven't even thought about that.
post #17 of 22
Dont feel bad its whats best for her. and once should do the trick.Having horses and dogs, I have noticed if a dog gets zapped much like a horse they wont try it again (ok some horses do and I am sure some dogs do) but if you have it all nice and adjusted everything should be ok.
post #18 of 22
Cathi, I don't have any advice as I am not familiar with this, but I am sending you and your doggies positives vibes that this will solve the problem!
post #19 of 22
Properly set electric fences are perfectly humane and can be an excellent tool to keep animals away from protected areas or to reduce escape potential. As long as the charger is rated (or set) for small animals (rather than horses and cows) there should be no problem. The shock is more of a start than anything else. It IS important the charger is sending the correct voltage for dogs.

Here are some other escape prevention techniques:

1) for animals that jump or climb the fence add an extension that tilts inward about 45 degrees. The wire fabric on the extension should actually sag so that when the animal tries to catch onto it the fabric will droop, causing the animal to be unable to continue.

2) for animals that push or dig out first you'll need to add a set of steel rails along the bottom of the fence ties securely to the fence fabric (like the rails at the top of most chain link fences.) Staking the fence will generally not work since there are still to many sags and weak points. These rails will often be sufficient, but for serious diggers attach fencing to the bottom rail and lay it on the ground (inside the fence). Cover this "dig barrier" with a couple of inches of dirt or mulch. When the dog tries to get out it will quickly hit the barrier and move to another area. Usually dogs will give up after a time, but some continually try to find a weak point. The fence will need to be inspected regularly. If you're going to add the dig barrier, you can often get away with a tension wire (minimum 9 gauge) at the fence bottom attached both to the fence fabric and the dig barrier. This is not as strong as the railing but is less expensive and much easier to install.

3) hot wires (like you've used) can be effective both to stop digging/pushing out and to stop climbing. As I mentioned, be sure the voltage is correct for the dogs. The other thing to be aware of when using a wire to prevent access to the bottom of the fence is that you'll need to keep plants from growing up to the wire and grounding it out. A weekly inspection and cutting back of any growth is usually sufficient, but be sure you consider type of plants and growth rates in your area.
post #20 of 22
Its best that you did that because if not you have the chance of losing your baby.. and that would be horrible.. soo, dont feel bad!!
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Yeah the fence has been a great success Nakita has stayed in the fence with only one or two tickles form it. I think all have learned a lesson about the fence now. Even little Ceasar got hit twice that I know of, but he is fine, just a little confused as to why he got bit by that new wire in the yard. Now I can breath easier and not worry about my babies getting hit in the highway
post #22 of 22
Cathi, this is a much better option then one of them getting bowled. Don't feel bad.
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