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Is spraying bad?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I've read on various sites that spraying a cat in the face when he does somethign wrong will help. But I seem to be reading contradicting views about it as well.

SHould I or should I not do it? Tendresse is now 9 months old and she doesn't like the spray bottle! We spray her when she jumps on the Christmas tree or does something she's not supposed to be doing...
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luds
I've read on various sites that spraying a cat in the face when he does somethign wrong will help. But I seem to be reading contradicting views about it as well.

SHould I or should I not do it? Tendresse is now 9 months old and she doesn't like the spray bottle! We spray her when she jumps on the Christmas tree or does something she's not supposed to be doing...
Not that water spray would be harmful to Tendresse, but we might suggest what has been, for us, a very effective alternative. We found that water was more likely to harm furniture and such.

We use "bottled air," a little spray can containing just that: air. We buy ours at Office Depot at a very reasonable price, and we have seen it at computer stores. They are designed for removing dirt and debris from computers, office equipment, audio equipment, video equipment, etc. You might be surprised, BTW, to see what comes flying out of your computer keyboard if you hit it with a puff of air. I find it extremely effective at removing lint from my sewing machine.

Anyway, I think you may find a puff of air just as effective as a water spray, and much less messy. We now only have to wave the can at Samwise and he stops the current evil he is engaged in.

All the best from a very cold Texas beach,

Ann
post #3 of 15
I know there are lots of views, but I think that it just teaches them to avoid you and the spray bottle! Better to discourage them from the tree by spraying it with lemon juice or a cat repellant
post #4 of 15
I agree with not using the spray bottle. It teaches the cat or kitten to be afraid of water, making it doubly difficult if you need to bathe them. The can of air is a very good idea. One bit of advice, you need to spray the can away from the cat's face as the air can cause a 'burn' if concentrated in one spot.

You can also use a low, loud growl or a loud 'hisssssss' to stop unwanted behaviour.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help!

My girlfriend and I will try not to spray for a while. Tendresse doesn't seem to be afraid of the bottle at all so far or even of us with the bottle in our hands... All she does is close her eyes and move her ears! (if she hasen't done anything wrong). She even uses the bottle to scratch if she feels like wanting attention!

The only time she runs away is if she knows that she does something wrong and we take the bottle and move towards her with the bottle pointing at her. That scares her more than the actual spray.

Anyways, we'll try just to shout NO! or Hisssssss!
post #6 of 15
What an adorable kitty! She is so young, and she is not misbehaving, she is being a kitten. Right now, Prowler who is 12 weeks old, is sitting on my computer desk chasing this cursor! LOL Do I want her up there? Not really, it's hard to see, but would i spray her with water or air? ABSOLUTELY NOT~ What I will do, is talk to her in language she understands. For her, water comforts her, comes in a bowl, and she can play with it and have fun with it. It should not scare her, or make her stop having fun. Air is something she needs to breathe for life, and taking compressed air and spraying it at a kitty can do some serious damage to them.

How I correct the kittens in my home, is I speak to them when they are doing things that might be dangerous for them. I give a gutteral and quick hiss and make a false pass in their direction to get their attention. They will then stop their activity and jump down. I then give them a treat (a toy) thrown to them to redirect their attention to something that won't hurt them.

Don't get me wrong, I used to spray water, and even use a bottle or air, but i have since talked to many cat experts (a perk of my job) and have decided that this is NOT the way to help correct a cat's behavior.

Good luck!
post #7 of 15
Quote:
We use "bottled air," a little spray can containing just that: air. We buy ours at Office Depot at a very reasonable price, and we have seen it at computer stores. They are designed for removing dirt and debris from computers, office equipment, audio equipment, video equipment, etc
This is what I use too on Saki when he jumps where he is not supposed to. I just give him 2 quick sprays on the butt. You would be amazed to see how fast he runs now even when I just pick up the bottle
post #8 of 15
I talk to my kitties too. They don't always listen to me though Today I found they had been on the counters in the kitchen, their clue? The toaster is on the floor! LOL seems everyone left this morning without filling the food dish. Poor toaster, hope it still works.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
I noticed things that moved on the table during the day as well... But at least that's one thing she never does: jumping on the table when we're there.

--

I'm happy to say that by paying attention to her signs, and being at home with her more during the hollidays, we figured that Tendresse really was desperate for attention. My girlfriend and I played with her for hours. It's just that we're away from 6am to 5pm, come home, have to cook and prepare the next day's lunch so there isn't as much time as we'd like to spend with her.

So we simply play with her with some toy while watching TV and have playing sessions with her as well where 100% of our attention is on her.

She's been much more passive. But she really misses us during the day. She loves her new toys that we got her for Christmas (yeah, I know ) She bring the toys on her bed and plays there... And when we pet her for a long time.
post #10 of 15
Have you thought of providing her with a companion kitty to keep her company during the day?
post #11 of 15
I just wanted to add that if you use canned air, make sure it is AIR!! There are other cans that look just the same but are compressed gas and that can burn!

Looking at my "can of air" (compressed gas) right now and here is the warning:

SKIN or EYE IRRITANT. Contents may cause severe burns (frostbite) on contact with skin or eye.

And same thought as Gayef, what about another kitty?
post #12 of 15
Ok, first off, if your kitten or cat misbehaves, distract them and direct their attention elsewhere or speak their language either with a hiss or low growl. They understand that as you not approving.

Secondly if you must use the water spray, spray at an area beside the cat to distract them. Then use a toy to distract them or perhaps have a short intensive play session allowing them to pounce and chase.

And lastly and most importantly, do not use canned air on your cats. It sounds like the gentle option but there are dangers with compressed air.

And I'm not even talking about the "burning" effect or whether the contents even contain air.

There is a reason as to why you don't use it on your skin!

The reason is that the "air" can contain small particles in it. When blown out, these particles can come out and are small enough to penetrate through your skin and enter the bloodstream. Not only that, bubbles of oxygen can enter the bloodstream which in turns causes serious complications. Both situations require a speedy trip to the hospital.

The risk is small, but nevertheless it's too great.

I'm not sure what these compressed air cans are. To be honest, I've never seen them, but all compressed air that I have seen come with the same warning. "Not for personal use"

Please find another way to distract your cats and kittens. Using compressed air is not a safe option. Please.
post #13 of 15
We have used the spray bottle method for years with great success...and we bathe our cats without much issue when needed. They are not afraid of us, but learn very quickly about what is acceptable and what isn't.

I have had cats not be afraid of it, added a tablespoon or two of vinegar, and they do not like smell..it worked.
post #14 of 15
Adding vinegar is simply making the situation more risky.

If that was to land on the cat's face or kitten's face it could cause bruns to the eyes, nose and nasal passages.

Not only this, if it were to enter the ear canal, the pH level could be disturbed leaving your cat prone to ear infections or build up of wax.

Vinegar, although is a weak acid, is an acid nevertheless. Citrus juices are also acidic.

Please, simply spray the water at an area beside the cat, not at the cat if you do use the spray bottle.

I use the spray bottle. Yes it remains effective as I use it as a tool to distract, not punish. Punsih a cat, they either learn to fear you or ignore you.
post #15 of 15
A tablespoon of vinegar in no way causes a concern to 16 ounces of water. It is common sense to not spray near the face with anything, even in the bathe, but yet we still bathe.

It is very mild and water does not hurt a cat.

Opinions are that and in 25 years, we have never had a cat fear us , ignore us or be harmed from being sprayed.
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