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Do you think that this is right? Americans pretending to be Canadians

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
from cp24.com

Disguise The Limit





Talk about identity theft - you had to know this was coming.

An Internet-based T-shirt company is selling what it calls a "Go Canadian" package for American tourists heading to Europe.

The contents are supposed to allow the travellers to visit other countries undisturbed by any negative comments about the war in Iraq, George Bush or other controversial issues.

For $25 U.S., buyers get a Canadian flag T-shirt, a Maple Leaf lapel pin, a patch bearing our symbols for their luggage and a book entitled "How To Speak Canadian, Eh?", which purports to answer all the things Americans ever wanted to know about their northern neighbours, but never cared to ask.

The New Mexico company behind the concept claims it's not trying to insult either nation, just have some fun, make some money and try to guarantee U.S. travellers a hassle free vacation.

"It's not meant as a slight against the United States or Canada," explains T-shirtKing.com President Bill Broadbent. "It was meant as something Republicans could give their Democrat friends to say 'C'est la vie.' ... But maybe not c'est la vie because that's a French word."

It came to him after a colleague related a story about an acquaintance who was given a rough time overseas. "So we were joking that they could just go as Canadians, and that just kind of evolved," concludes Broadbent.

So how is the brilliant disguise selling? Not bad. Since it was first posted November 12th, the company has pedalled a few hundred of them. And they expect more will be ordered, as the vacation season heats up in earnest.

Lifelong Democrat Dani Delaney, who claimed after the U.S. vote that "if I could move to Canada, I would," bought one. "I admire their liberal, progressive stand on things," the 57-year-old University of New Mexico writing instructor declares. "And I thought, 'Well, that's a good way to peacefully protest.'"

The deal comes in typical cross border fashion. The contents are Canadian. But you have to pay in U.S. funds.





December 7, 2004
post #2 of 26
LOL! That's funny.
post #3 of 26
Hmm - maybe I should try that when talk turns to Iraq!
post #4 of 26
It's too bad that Americans have to worry so much about their safety abroad these days. I don't see anything wrong with it except that it's a sad commentary on life in general when Americans have to hide their nationality when traveling outside of their own country for their own safety.
post #5 of 26
Well to each their own but the day I pretend to be another nationality to travel, is the day I stop traveling. If I'm not welcome as an American then I'm not welcome at all and I don't go where I'm not welcome.
post #6 of 26
I'm me where ever I am. No disguise. No pretense. I wouldn't do it.

Guess those who buy the stuff need to practice on those sorrys! Sorry is pronounced differently in Canada.
post #7 of 26
I am a PROUD US citizen - NOT a hypocrite!

No offense to Canadians but, I am what I am.
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e
I am a PROUD US citizen - NOT a hypocrite!

No offense to Canadians but, I am what I am.
I agree with you. Americans are welcome to Canada anytime they want, but if an American has to pretend they are something that they aren't then I find that very sad.
post #9 of 26
doesn't it seem like a joke though?? Like someone from canada walks around with a canadian flag shirt and hat and stuff.

Although I would probably avoid saying I'm American if I were in Europe, I'm sure they would realize what i was eventually and I wouldn't deny it. But really I don't want my butt kicked or worse!! At least I'm an anti Bush anti war American so if they let me get in a few sentences before the fit me with concrete shoes and toss me in the river I might be able to talk my way out of it.
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
ACtually, Canadian love to wear their pride of country when they travel Europe. When I went, I had a lapel pin. Unfortunately, even before 9/11, some Europeans had a biased view of American travellers being loud and obnoxious (based on movies) and I think that biased view more then anything is what causes problems for Americans travelling to Europe at least. I was on a bus trip and noticed that I was often treated better then some Americans on the same trip, even though they did not fit the loud/obnoxious mold.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by adymarie
ACtually, Canadian love to wear their pride of country when they travel Europe. When I went, I had a lapel pin. Unfortunately, even before 9/11, some Europeans had a biased view of American travellers being loud and obnoxious (based on movies) and I think that biased view more then anything is what causes problems for Americans travelling to Europe at least. I was on a bus trip and noticed that I was often treated better then some Americans on the same trip, even though they did not fit the loud/obnoxious mold.
Well said. Most Canadians I know always wear a lapel pin or something else to indicate they are Canadian since Canadians do get treated better than Americans. Unfortunately Europeans have a bad view of American tourists as you say. As the old saying goes, one or two bad apples can spoil the whole barrel and I think that's what has happened to our American friends.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by annabelle33
But really I don't want my butt kicked or worse!! At least I'm an anti Bush anti war American so if they let me get in a few sentences before the fit me with concrete shoes and toss me in the river I might be able to talk my way out of it.
LOL. Yeah, that's what I am thinking.

"Hey, are you an American?"

"Well, before I answer that let's have a little talk about politics..."

post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosemite
...Unfortunately Europeans have a bad view of American tourists as you say. As the old saying goes, one or two bad apples can spoil the whole barrel and I think that's what has happened to our American friends.
If someone judges an ENTIRE nation from two or three people, their data is skewed. Surely most Europeans can make assessments on a case by case basis.

I would think the country receiving tourists and their funds would be appreciative--if only for the money. Put up with the obnoxious person. They'll leave in two or three weeks...
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsd
If someone judges an ENTIRE nation from two or three people, their data is skewed. Surely most Europeans can make assessments on a case by case basis.
I don't think so. Look at all the "French/France bashing" that went on in the U.S.. "Liberty fries", and all that.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I don't think so. Look at all the "French/France bashing" that went on in the U.S.. "Liberty fries", and all that.
Touché
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcat
I don't think so. Look at all the "French/France bashing" that went on in the U.S.. "Liberty fries", and all that.
Nope. Not all Americans called them Liberty fries. I didn't. Then again, I'm a discerning American...
post #17 of 26
I know this is a bit off topic but when I was in Canada sometime back I recall watching this particular comedy (This hour has 22 minutes or was it something else) but this thread reminded me of this particular skit.

There was an advertisement by Tim Hortons (Canadian Starbucks sort of) about carrying your Tim Hortons mug when travelling so fellow Canadians would know each other. So the skit shows this person carrying the mug talking to another person and as the camera pans out it turns out he is in jail. A Syrian jail. It was at the time of the Maher Arar incident, which was about this Canadian-Syrian who was arrested by immigration officers in US and deported him to Syria instead of Canada, where he was tortured.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrayKittenLove
Well to each their own but the day I pretend to be another nationality to travel, is the day I stop traveling. If I'm not welcome as an American then I'm not welcome at all and I don't go where I'm not welcome.


I so second Traci. THANK YOU. And it's on us (our personal responsibility) to knock the Ugly Barbaric American out of the park, too.
post #19 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsd
If someone judges an ENTIRE nation from two or three people, their data is skewed. Surely most Europeans can make assessments on a case by case basis.
Unfortunately, it's sorta like the "squeaky wheel". It's the loud obnoxious people who get noticed most readily and remembered, regardless how few there actually are, and then the rest of the lovely, polite, friendly Americans get tarred with the same brush. And if your first couple of experiences of an identifiable group happen to be negative ones it can be difficult to remember that they aren't necessarily representative. It's not fair. But it's what happens.

It doesn't help that there are so many Americans -- something just under 300,000,000 -- as opposed to, for instance, just under 60,000,000 UK residents and just under 33,000,000 Canadians. Proportionally, I'm sure there are no more loud and obnoxious Americans than there are Brits or Canadians -- they are just part of a much larger body and therefore more visible.

Again, it's not fair. But it's what happens.
post #20 of 26
As a European (however reluctantly-I'm English) it has to be said that a lot of Europe does not take kindly to Americans! Sorry! Maybe it is the brash behaviour or the bullying we see in your politics - I dont know. No we do not make judgements on a case by case basis - what makes Europeans any differnt in that respect from americans-witness the 'liberty fries' !

I would think the country receiving tourists and their funds would be appreciative--if only for the money. Put up with the obnoxious person. They'll leave in two or three weeks...

Why should we 'appreciate' your bad manners along with your money?
Unfortunately I cant always tell the difference between anAmerican or a Canadian accent but the Candadian is very quick to tell you where he is from whereas the americans I have met are often quite apologetic! (which is a shame).
Most Amercians that travel are not obnoxious but you do have a bad reputation - as do we Brits. Little you can do about it except on a small individual level and hope that the fact that when you do travel abroad you dont fit the expected mould.
post #21 of 26
I didn't say you had to appreciate bad manners and obnoxious people. I said be appreciative, if only for the money. Tourism is a big business.

I would tell you I am an American and without apology. I have great manners, I wait my turn, speak softly, (and carry a big stick ). But I'm not ashamed of my country. There are plenty of reasons to be proud of the United States. Those Europeans who don't like Americans are missing out on a lot of great people.
post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tulip2454
Most Amercians that travel are not obnoxious but you do have a bad reputation - as do we Brits.
The British have a bad reputation? News to me. I think there are some stereotypes of British people, but it is mostly that they drink a lot of tea and go fox hunting, etc... I don't think they have a bad reputation though; at least, not in the same way that Americans seem to have to British people. In fact, I think most Americans think British people are cute because of their mannerisms.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquarius
The British have a bad reputation? News to me. I think there are some stereotypes of British people, but it is mostly that they drink a lot of tea and go fox hunting, etc... I don't think they have a bad reputation though; at least, not in the same way that Americans seem to have to British people. In fact, I think most Americans think British people are cute because of their mannerisms.


I'll take the bad reps of Hugh Grant, Patrick Stewart, and Jude Law anytime. BRING IT ON!!
post #24 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquarius
The British have a bad reputation? News to me. I think there are some stereotypes of British people, but it is mostly that they drink a lot of tea and go fox hunting, etc... I don't think they have a bad reputation though; at least, not in the same way that Americans seem to have to British people. In fact, I think most Americans think British people are cute because of their mannerisms.
Maybe thats what you are up against, not reputaiton as such but steroetyping. I think every country is guilty of that one i.e. the French are seen as sexy, the Italians are seen as totally male orientated and the Swiss just boring! Visit those countries and meet the people and the stereotype is blown out the water. I wonder who thinks these things up. The vast majority of Brits who visit america go to the standard places ie Disneyland, Niagra Falls etc., so americans are seen as big, brash and 'colourful'. Just as americans visit London and maybe Bath or York and also meet with a fantasy world. None of these places offer a balanced view of country or of its people.
Statistically coffee is drunk far more than tea and few of us can afford the time to fox hunt!
Not too sure about the cute though
post #25 of 26
I thought it was freedom fries and liberty toast.. hehehe..
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by annabelle33
I thought it was freedom fries and liberty toast.. hehehe..
I believe you're correct. Whatever - it was a really asinine reaction to France's opposition to a "pre-emptive strike".
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