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Would you want a pet Cheetah?

post #1 of 71
Thread Starter 
Would you ever want a cheetah as a pet? Believe it or not, but cheetahs can be tamed quite easily.

Lions and tigers can only be "trained". Trainers remind us that big cats like tigers and lions are wild at heart, and can't be trusted all the time. I'm sure you've probably heard many stories about big cats who went berserk on their owners.

Cheetahs, though many times considered a big cat, is very different from all cats. In fact, they have many dog like features, like claws that can't retract. And cheetahs are very bashful, clean, and calm compared to other animals. There has never been an attack ever by a cheetah on a human being. Oh and just incase you forgot, cheetahs are the fastest land animal, capable of running 65 MPH for short distances.

But the thing that makes a cheetah such a good animals to have as a pet is the fact that cheetahs are very nice and some domestic dogs have a better chance of attacking you than even a wild cheetah.

And they arn't too hard to control either. Infact, an average sized man can easily overpower a cheetah. Though by looking at a cheetah, one might think twice from attacking you, even though the robber might be stronger than the cheetah. Only one problem with cheetahs as pets is feeding them. I don't think cat food will be enough, they can be up to 125 pounds.

Would you ever consider this shy bashful, yet loving cat to be your pet?
post #2 of 71
I don't believe in having wild animals as pets. Even carers who foster orphaned lions, cheetas, tigers etc. usually use a program where contact with humans is decreased over time in the hope that they can be re-introduced into the wild. I understand that there are cases where wild animals have become tame and cannot be released back into the wild and I think the best option is then a wildlife sanctuary.
post #3 of 71
I agree with Tania that I don't believe in having wild animals as pets

but lets talk hypothetical and forget all of that - I would have one - I think they are totally stunning creatures - so very graceful - but of course this is all hypothetical because it would never ever happen as I stated earlier.
Its just like I would love a pet elephant (I just adore elephants) but thats never gonna happen either!!! does that makes sense?

however you would hate to take it for a walk and then it dash off and chase something with you holding onto the leash at 65MPH I can guarentee that I would not keep up
post #4 of 71
Imagine the size of those "scoops" in the litterbox..you'd need a forklift to remove em...flushable, I think not!
post #5 of 71
Wild animals are wild for a very good reason.They are not "pets."

I wonder what movies like Two Brothers (coming out soon) does to the exotic animal trade?
post #6 of 71
Quote:
There has never been an attack ever by a cheetah on a human being
Absolutely not true. Though extremely rare there are instances of cheetah attacks, and children can be particularly at risk. The largest normal food source for wild cheetahs are gazelles and dwarf antelopes, primarily the Thompson's Gazelle, roughly as tall as a large German Shepard, but weighing around 50-70 lbs. Cheetahs don't consider adult humans as a food source but have been known to attack when they feel threatened or in defense of offspring.

Quote:
But the thing that makes a cheetah such a good animals to have as a pet is the fact that cheetahs are very nice and some domestic dogs have a better chance of attacking you than even a wild cheetah.
Wild cheetahs don't generally consider humans as a food source (as I mentioned) but good pets? I think not, you better check your sources. Like all wild cats kept in captivity there is that ticking time bomb effect. At some point something will set off the wild nature and a disaster is likely. A small adult is around 90 lbs and can easily inflict fatal injuries.

Quote:
And they arn't too hard to control either. Infact, an average sized man can easily overpower a cheetah.
Not hardly. Again, a SMALL adult is around 90 lbs, with a large one over 140. They are strong, agile, and have teeth and claws.

Even their claws don't fully retract these are very definitely cats and not dogs. Their behavior is very typically cat. Their hunting tactics also are like other big cats (stalk, quick chase, trip, strangle) vs large dog tactics (isolate, slow pursue to exhaustion, restrain & shred).

In captivity the containment requirements are extremely expensive and specific. Cheetahs are sensitive to cold and require a long run (400 meters minimum, at least 800 meters preferred.) These animals can become extremely fragile in captive settings.

There are two species of cheetah (African, Asiatic). Both are endangered, the Asiatic Cheetah critically so with less than 200 remaining in the wild.
post #7 of 71
I have read that the ancient Egyptians kept cheetahs as hunting cats.

Personally, I don't hold with keeping wild animals as pets but I am aware of the need for keeping a certain number in captive breeding programs, to preserve the species. It is my understanding that the cheetah gene pool is very small and has led to inbreeding and low sperm counts and motility, in the males. It appears that the current birthrate, in the wild, is not consistent with maintaining the population.

I saw a TV special, years ago, about a program based near San Diego, that breeds cheetahs and trains them to go back into the wild in order to diversify the gene pool.

My wild-animal keeping will be confined to tiger- leopard- and cheetah-print clothing.
post #8 of 71
CharmsDad has got the ticket on this one. The Cheetah is furthest genetically from the domestic cat in the feline world and are bery different indeed from other big cats, but that in no way makes them canine-like. Yes, they tame very easily, but they are still wild animals and should remain so. They're also threatened and the idea of taming them for our own selfish reasons seems rather cruel to me. I'm against having wild animals as pets, but not just because of the danger to humans...mostly for the danger to the animal.

I do have to admit that we had a bobcat when I was growing up, but only because we found him as a baby and he would have died without our help. He later mated with our domestic tabby (in those days we still believed that females would be much better cats after a litter). Their kittens were...wow. HUGE for one thing. They were sweeties, too, but one of them did attack his owner's poodle when the poodle threatened his food when he was about 2 years old.

Just because we CAN tame an animal, does that mean that we should? Yes, we have tamed the African wildcat and the wolf and the coyote and the dingo to create our domesticated dogs and cats today, but they also invited themselves to domestication, not the other way around. Domestication is genetically determined and the african wild cat was genetically predisposed to it. Some animals CANNOT be domesticated genetically speaking. Try to domesticate a reticulated python or another animal which relies heavily upon its instinct. Big cats are included here. Taming and domestication are very very different things. Yes, some tigers and lions and cheetahs and pythons and such can be TAMED...but not domesticated fully. Because it is not in the best interest of the species to be so, they are not genetically predisposed to domestication. Period. We ought to respect that.
post #9 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by DiMa
CharmsDad has got the ticket on this one. The Cheetah is furthest genetically from the domestic cat in the feline world and are bery different indeed from other big cats, but that in no way makes them canine-like. Yes, they tame very easily, but they are still wild animals and should remain so. They're also threatened and the idea of taming them for our own selfish reasons seems rather cruel to me. I'm against having wild animals as pets, but not just because of the danger to humans...mostly for the danger to the animal.

I do have to admit that we had a bobcat when I was growing up, but only because we found him as a baby and he would have died without our help. He later mated with our domestic tabby (in those days we still believed that females would be much better cats after a litter). Their kittens were...wow. HUGE for one thing. They were sweeties, too, but one of them did attack his owner's poodle when the poodle threatened his food when he was about 2 years old.

Just because we CAN tame an animal, does that mean that we should? Yes, we have tamed the African wildcat and the wolf and the coyote and the dingo to create our domesticated dogs and cats today, but they also invited themselves to domestication, not the other way around.


Domestication is genetically determined and the african wild cat was genetically predisposed to it. Some animals CANNOT be domesticated genetically speaking. Try to domesticate a reticulated python or another animal which relies heavily upon its instinct. Big cats are included here. Taming and domestication are very very different things. Yes, some tigers and lions and cheetahs and pythons and such can be TAMED...but not domesticated fully. Because it is not in the best interest of the species to be so, they are not genetically predisposed to domestication. Period. We ought to respect that.
I'd have to disagree.

Domestication comes through generations.

All of these animals can be domesticated, however the cost of domestication and the amount of experience required to properly care for these animals makes their domestication challenging.

These animals can be domesticated, not tamed.

Domestication is all that is left for most of these animals. Born Free, while a great concept, is not a proven means to ensure the survival of the species.

The SSP program that some zoos participate in, is only designed to ensure the survival of a species for a few decades (something like 50 years).

Reintroduction is problematic at best. Discouraging the killing (poaching) of these animals in the wild is problematic also. Simply put, these animals are worth more dead, than alive. Until the economic factor is changed, there is no chance of survival in the wild for these animals.

Domestication, Private Ownership, Reintroduction studies, Genetic Diversification. All of this together is the only guaranteed means of ensuring the survival of the species.

So yes, I would own a cheetah, "as a pet" if necessary, but I would also be sure that I knew what I needed to know before ever embarking on this course of action.

Spotz
post #10 of 71
Oh...a little off topic, however...

How many people here would own a wolf as a pet?

Wolves are definately different from dogs...however, you can't prove it by a simple DNA profile.

The genetics of a Wolf and a Domestic Dog, are so similar that you could never prove a difference in a court of law, based solely on genetics.

Yet anyone who has ever worked around or with wolves, would tell you that there is not a comparison.

The predisposition to domestication cannot be easily associated with genetics.

Spotz
post #11 of 71
Thread Starter 
All pets we have, came from wild animals. The domestic dog came from the Grey Wolf, and the domestic cat came from the African Wild Cat.

Cheetahs are much different than other cats, and can well be tamed. Mainly it is because of their personality.

And who ever said that cheetahs attack man is not true. They may prey after small children rarely, but they would never try to confront a human, because all cheetahs avoid fighting, unless they have no choice and you back them against a corner. Cheetahs have a nack or funning away from any animal that doesn't look like prey. And because humans walk on two legs, they don't look anything like prey.

I have also confirmed with animal experts from other forums that a cheetah is no suited to fight as much as human. They said an average size man can overpower a cheetzh, providing he isn't afraid to get a couple cuts.
post #12 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobra
I have also confirmed with animal experts from other forums that a cheetah is no suited to fight as much as human. They said an average size man can overpower a cheetzh, providing he isn't afraid to get a couple cuts.
Not true. Unless the animal is declawed (not really possible for a cheetah), and even then it's a coin toss.

Sure you could beat the animal into submission....that's one method used for fighting dogs....but then it really isn't domestication as it is domination.

Domination and Taming go hand in hand.

Symbiosis and Domestication go hand in hand.

Any animal can be tamed....but a tame animal is an animal waiting for a chance to turn the table.

Any animal can be domesticated....a domesticated animal rarely turns.

Tamed animals are filled with fear and hate.

Domesticated animals are filled with happiness and love.

I personally prefer domestication. I prefer to work with an animal on a social level, rather than a dominant level.

Domestication is the key, not Tameing.

Cheetahs, as with any animal can kill a person. Domestic Cats have killed people. Being able to overpower an animal, means absolutely nothing, not a d@$% thing.

I'm not to fond of the path this conversation is turning...can we please shift the focus back to the original question.

Spotz
post #13 of 71
Depends on how much you overpower it A gun would tip the scales in the humans direction.
Anyways, no I would not have a cheetah as a pet.

Later,
Brandon
post #14 of 71
Yes, I would love to have a Cheetah as a pet, but one must remember, these animals ARE NOT something you own just because you think it would be cool to have. Let me tell you, I speak from experience. I do not own a Cheetah, but I do have a bobcat that will soon be 1 year old. These animals take a considerable amount of time. I do not have any human children, but ever since I had Amber, I mind as well. She is like having a 2 year old running around here constantly. Do I regret it? Never!! I love Amber more than I can say and all the work, time and dedication is well worth it to me. But, this is NOT for everyone. I would never suggest to anyone, to get a wild cat as a pet unless you are willing to care for this animal forever. They are not toys or show off pets. People that do own these animals to be a show off, ruin it for the people like me, that own one because we truly love the feline species. Amber was not taken from the wild, she came from a breeder, so there is no chance of her "going back to being wild". But, she is a powerful animal. Even though a bobcat is smaller than a cheetah, an adult bobcat can take down an adult deer. So, to say that an average man could easily subdue a cheetah, is NOT based on fact. I have been smacked in the face by Amber many times, she is just playing, but it feels like a person smacking me. I feed her raw chicken, bones and all. She chews the bones up like they were crackers. So they do have a very powerful jaw. Yes, I would love to own a cheetah, but to others that would ever think of owning a wild cat, I must say this again. Think twice, no, think 10 times before you ever consider. These cats can not be given to your local shelter if you could no longer provide for it. Bobcat and Lynx become very attached to their human companions, but do not take well to being put into a new home, if you could not keep it. They can live 25 years in captivity. So to me, it is ok to own such a beautiful creature, but only if you can give up a great deal of your life to the animal, becuase that is what it takes. One more thing, the only way these cats can make a good pet, is if they come from a breeder who has raised them in captivity. A kitten taken from the wild will NOT make a good pet and in most areas it is illegal to own one that is wild caught.
post #15 of 71
Fascinated as I am with all the big cats, I have no desire to take one from the wild and make a pet of it -- not in any circumstance. I admire John and Terri for their dedication to Amber, and I hear them loud and clear on the cautions about taking such an animal -- even one bred for the purpose -- into one's life. No, wild animals should remain wild. There may be reasons to do with preservation of the species that warrant interfering with them, but making pets of them is not a valid one, to my mind.
post #16 of 71
Thread Starter 
Trust me on the man overpowering a cheetah. I confirmed it with many animal experts and they say the man wins 7 out of 10 times. Sharp claws and teeth doesn't guarentee victory.

That has nothing to do with it really. No matter how tame or domestic an animal can become, you have to take the effort to take care of it. It angers me to see people get exotic animals and not seeing the hardships of training. They then leave them in testing labs and what not. That is why people are so against exotic "wild" animals, and they have good reason to. But I know I will if I ever get one know how to train such animals, and train him right. Not abandon them like other do.
post #17 of 71
I love big cats, but I would never own one as a pet. I don't think Wild Animals should be kept as Pets. We have a new TV series that just started in NZ here last night about a man who is looking after a nearly extinct species of Tiger, and another species of Lion but he was saying that you never really know what the tigers next move is going to be, because they're wild animals. Although Wild cats captivate me, I don't have the facilities to own one.
post #18 of 71
no way!
post #19 of 71
aaaah - the beautiful wild cats! In my fantasy world I would love to have one of each species, (particularly partial to the black panther and the snow leopard), BUT have to agree with most of the folks here that wild animals (of any kind) should not be kept as pets. In some cases where qualified people are caring for discarded or abandoned animals I have no problem with that - in fact I think they are doing a wonderful service and deserve all the assistance and praise they can get.
post #20 of 71
I certainly would not mind... but I am afraid that the Department of Natural Resources of PR would try to reinstate the death penalty in PR just for me.

Anyway, my main concern would be: No matter how domesticated it is, the chances of it even harming you by mistake... you know, a Cheetah is pretty strong an animal... the same way your kitts can scab your arm playing with it.... well, I don't want to think about it. I hate the sight of blood.
post #21 of 71
Trust me on the man overpowering a cheetah. I confirmed it with many animal experts and they say the man wins 7 out of 10 times. Sharp claws and teeth doesn't guarentee victory
These are the kind of things that get people into trouble and a wild animal getting abandoned. I don't know who these so called animal experts are, but I doubt if this was based on fact. If you wrestled with a Cheetah that was raised in captivity along with humans, yes, I am sure you could win, because the animal trusts you. But if this was one taken from the wild, there is no way. Let me tell you, sharp claws and teeth do guarentee victory. I wonder if these so called "animal experts" wrestled with a cheetah who was declawed or had its teeth removed. This may also be the case. Let me tell you about the strength of these wild cats. Amber, by all means, is small compared to the much larger wild cats. When mature, she will grow to 30-40 pounds and males about 40-60. Amber is around 21 pounds at the moment, it will take her 3 years to fully mature. As it stands right now, she can actually drag an 8 pound cat carrier with a 12 pound cat inside, across the floor with no problem. Her paws are as wide as a human hand. Imagine that smacking you with huge claws that are more than double the size of a domestic cats claws. Now, I can only imagine the strength of a cheetah. It doesn't mean that I am against anyone owning such an animal, but it is those kind of statements that make people think anyone could own one. This is not so. When people see me with Amber an say "wow, that would be cool to have one. Where did you get her". My reply is no, it is not "cool" and I never tell them where she came from. I also ask people if they have ever owned a domestic cat and for how long. If they say no, I never had one, I tell them never in a million years should you think of owning a cat like Amber. I have lived with cats all 43 years of my life. I never claim to be an expert, but I have a great deal respect for them.
post #22 of 71
Quote:
Trust me on the man overpowering a cheetah. I confirmed it with many animal experts and they say the man wins 7 out of 10 times. Sharp claws and teeth doesn't guarentee victory.
Cobra and Spotz, listen to Charmsdad and John. They're the experts on this forum. They both have the experience. If you check out this thread, you'll see Charmsdad with one of his new "kittens"
http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37079

and we've all seen pictures of Amber.

Domestication takes generations to accomplish. Not raising a big cat from a kitten.

Sandy

PS...be that as it may, I think the IDEA of having a big cat as a pet is inticing. The reality of it goes in the opposite direction.
post #23 of 71
Would I like one YES - but reality dictates that it would NOT be a good idea for the cat nor the potential owner. Too many people dive into this fantacy and learn too late that reality is nothing like their dream. Unfortunately that is how thesebeautiful creatures wind up discarded, dead or in horrible situation.
post #24 of 71
Hmmm.. regarding the human vs. cheetah fight: Do the humans get time to prepare? Any tool? If a stong man got the cat in a headlock, I say he could do away with it right there.
post #25 of 71
I can't run that fast---->"Oh and just in case you forgot, cheetahs are the fastest land animal, capable of running 65 MPH for short distances." But if I could train her to nanny my speeding toddler, I'd consider it.

Nah. Besides, I couldn't afford the food bill.

mrsd
post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweets
Cobra and Spotz, listen to Charmsdad and John. They're the experts on this forum. They both have the experience. If you check out this thread, you'll see Charmsdad with one of his new "kittens"
http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=37079

and we've all seen pictures of Amber.

Domestication takes generations to accomplish. Not raising a big cat from a kitten.

Sandy

PS...be that as it may, I think the IDEA of having a big cat as a pet is inticing. The reality of it goes in the opposite direction.
Virtually every single animal available for captive ownership, is generations removed from wild.

They are already in the process of domestication.

Thanks for the reminder Sandy about credentials. I believe I have mentioned mine in the past, I don't speak merely from hypothetical. I've been working with these various animals for quite a few years now also.

Spotz
post #27 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberThe Bobcat
Trust me on the man overpowering a cheetah. I confirmed it with many animal experts and they say the man wins 7 out of 10 times. Sharp claws and teeth doesn't guarentee victory
These are the kind of things that get people into trouble and a wild animal getting abandoned. I don't know who these so called animal experts are, but I doubt if this was based on fact. If you wrestled with a Cheetah that was raised in captivity along with humans, yes, I am sure you could win, because the animal trusts you. But if this was one taken from the wild, there is no way. Let me tell you, sharp claws and teeth do guarentee victory. I wonder if these so called "animal experts" wrestled with a cheetah who was declawed or had its teeth removed. This may also be the case. Let me tell you about the strength of these wild cats. Amber, by all means, is small compared to the much larger wild cats. When mature, she will grow to 30-40 pounds and males about 40-60. Amber is around 21 pounds at the moment, it will take her 3 years to fully mature. As it stands right now, she can actually drag an 8 pound cat carrier with a 12 pound cat inside, across the floor with no problem. Her paws are as wide as a human hand. Imagine that smacking you with huge claws that are more than double the size of a domestic cats claws. Now, I can only imagine the strength of a cheetah. It doesn't mean that I am against anyone owning such an animal, but it is those kind of statements that make people think anyone could own one. This is not so. When people see me with Amber an say "wow, that would be cool to have one. Where did you get her". My reply is no, it is not "cool" and I never tell them where she came from. I also ask people if they have ever owned a domestic cat and for how long. If they say no, I never had one, I tell them never in a million years should you think of owning a cat like Amber. I have lived with cats all 43 years of my life. I never claim to be an expert, but I have a great deal respect for them.
Thanks John. Very true.

Suffice to say, a person will not win a battle with even a domesticated bobcat, not hand to hand. Based on experience, not theory.

My statments regarding Cheetahs are also based on experience. My information is based on personal experience with Cheetahs, or those of the friends I have that own them. I have seen the scars.

Spotz
post #28 of 71
Because cheetahs are wild, and quite large, I think it would be crule to keep one in a domistic household. Simple as that. But, still, in wildlife cheetahs are awesome!
post #29 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cobra
Trust me on the man overpowering a cheetah. I confirmed it with many animal experts and they say the man wins 7 out of 10 times. Sharp claws and teeth doesn't guarentee victory.

That has nothing to do with it really. No matter how tame or domestic an animal can become, you have to take the effort to take care of it. It angers me to see people get exotic animals and not seeing the hardships of training. They then leave them in testing labs and what not. That is why people are so against exotic "wild" animals, and they have good reason to. But I know I will if I ever get one know how to train such animals, and train him right. Not abandon them like other do.
Glad to hear you will seek first hand experience. Any non-domestic felid is a tremendous responsibility. Domestics pale in comparison. A desire to learn as much as you can instead of diving in head first, is a mandatory requirement.

Spotz
PS Where do you live?
post #30 of 71
Suffice to say, a person will not win a battle with even a domesticated bobcat, not hand to hand. Based on experience, not theory.

I couldn't agree with this more. Let me tell you, I have seen this with Amber. My first experience was with a new toy we had gotten her. It was a ball that had a feather on it. Well, she ran off with it, but when I went to get it from her, she was in no way going to let me have it. It wasn't that she would run away, she stood her ground and wanted to fight. But, she wasn't angry at me, it was the toy that set her off. The feather made her think she had prey in her mouth. This incident did not bother me, because I understand her and why she did what she did. So, she no longer gets that type of toy. A bobcat in the wild can be quite fierce. However, Amber is very loving. Her favorite thing to do is jump on my back, puts her rear on the back of my head and dangles both back legs around the sides of my neck and the lies down. All the while her 6 inch tail whips around hitting me in the back of the head. She also likes to put her front paw in my hand, like she is holding my hand and then grooms my arm.
Sandy, thank you for the compliment, but I am no expert, just did my homework before ever considering brining a bobcat in my home and I am still doing my homeowrk. Feeding these cats the proper diet is another issue for their good health. Spotz helped me to find a good vitamin supplement for her, even though we found a new one that she actually likes, so I know he knows what he is talking about.
Cougar, I doubt even a so called "strong man" could get a cheetah in a head lock, only if the animal let him.
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