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Interpretations of certain "profanities"

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Barbara's thread, or at least the mention of this word on people's HATE this Word list, prompted me to post about this. Even Rush Limbaugh commented on this story yesterday.

http://rockymountainnews.com/drmn/lo...966601,00.html

The President of the University of Colorado, Elizabeth Hoffman where all the sex/drinking recruiting scandals are going on, said in a deposition that she's heard the c--- word used as a term of endearment. ::censor::censor::censor:: (Which, BTW, was Rush's reaction to this story as well.) I'll tell you what, anyone used that word directed toward me, endearment or not, would get a hard punch in the mouth!

Anyway, I'm wondering others' thoughts, especially from our feminists and liberals (not said with any demeaning tone intended. ). Reason I ask is that CU is a notoriously liberal college (well, Boulder as a city is so far left as to make my conservative self cringe), and very much for advancing women's rights. I have to assume that Ms. Hoffman fits in with those beliefs in order to be appointed as President of the University....
post #2 of 18
To me, c*** is just like calling a guy a p***k; both are rarely used as "terms of endearment", and I'd never accept them as such. Ms. Hoffman's days as a university president may soon be over, as this story is bound to be disseminated.
post #3 of 18
There are some words that have no place being used in civilized society. That's one of them.

I believe that if I ever heard that word directed toward one of my daughters or my wife, a state of hostilies would instantly exist that would result in other profanities being uttered by the perpetrator while I beat the snot out of them.

In the case of this College President, one can only hope that she's soon replaced by a humanoid with a functioning brain. Preferably one that walks upright.


Jeff
post #4 of 18
There are a lot of words out there that can be used as endearments. I however do not believe this is one of them. It is just plain foul and anyone who tried to call me that wouldn't think I was very endearing after I got done ripping them a new one. Honestly I would take b*tch better than the "c" word.
post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Speaking of the B word....

A wonderful lady I knew had been a Principal in a rough high school. She was called that more times than she could remember. When a student in for discipline called her that, she smiled and said "Thank you!" When they got totally confused why she would thank them for calling her such a name, she calmly replied with a smile, "Don't you know what that means? It means Being In Total Control, Honey!" She was classic!
post #6 of 18
The only part of society in which I have ever heard of c_ _ _ being used as a term of endearment was in the BDSM lifestyle. (Bondage Discipline Sado-Masochism. )

Personally, if a man ever used that term about me, he wouldn't be getting any c--- for a long time while he heals.

Sandy
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by valanhb
Barbara's thread, or at least the mention of this word on people's HATE this Word list, prompted me to post about this. Even Rush Limbaugh commented on this story yesterday.

http://rockymountainnews.com/drmn/lo...966601,00.html

The President of the University of Colorado, Elizabeth Hoffman where all the sex/drinking recruiting scandals are going on, said in a deposition that she's heard the c--- word used as a term of endearment. ::censor::censor::censor:: (Which, BTW, was Rush's reaction to this story as well.) I'll tell you what, anyone used that word directed toward me, endearment or not, would get a hard punch in the mouth!

Anyway, I'm wondering others' thoughts, especially from our feminists and liberals (not said with any demeaning tone intended. ). Reason I ask is that CU is a notoriously liberal college (well, Boulder as a city is so far left as to make my conservative self cringe), and very much for advancing women's rights. I have to assume that Ms. Hoffman fits in with those beliefs in order to be appointed as President of the University....
I don't think that use of profanity has anything to do with political orientation. I would find the inferred connection to the pursuit of womens' rights to be provocative, except that it is too silly.

My first work experience was 10 years in a then big 8 accounting firm, whose partners were not known for their liberal attititudes abt politics. A profuse amount of profanities came out of their mouths.
While the 'F' word seems to be used as an all purpose verb often
not referring to a sexual act, and prick is used descriptively to refer to a difficult person, usually male, I can only remember hearing someone refer to a woman using the 'c' word once. (This was a consultant talking abt one of his ex-wives, during a meal break in a busy work project. Even the men in the room looked embarrassed.)

Curiously the 'F' word, the "C" word and prick are all entries on the Dictionary.com website. The F word in particular has quite a few definitions and uses. I put the "f' word into Google and got 10.7 million hits. The C word has about half as many entries.
post #8 of 18
C'mon Heidi, even Tony Soprano only digs it out for women he has absolutely no use for!
post #9 of 18
I've never heard that word used to indicate anything other than pure contempt for the recipient of the comment.
post #10 of 18
To me - the word is a non-gender specific (i.e., aimed as much at men as at women) insult. It probably is the worst insult that can be levied in the UK. Pr**k is mild in comparison. Almost jokey infact.
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucia
I don't think that use of profanity has anything to do with political orientation. I would find the inferred connection to the pursuit of womens' rights to be provocative, except that it is too silly.
You are absolutely right, Lucia. It isn't about political affiliation. Guess I just wanted to confirm that people of all affilitations are as stunned by that comment as I was! Seems pretty obvious that she was trying to cover the universities' rear end, saying that there's no problems there.
post #12 of 18
I personally detest the word...however in the lesbian community (I am NOT speaking for the whole community) it can be used as an insult, and during sex...NOT an insult...a lot of things are said in the heat of the moment! In the male gay community, said to another man/woman, it's def a put down. I guess this is one thing I love about words, they are always evolving...sometimes in a good way, sometimes in a bad way!
This is my only use for Conservative Bill Safire by the way...one of the masters of language!
post #13 of 18
Personally, I deplore the lack of civility, these days. It seems that most of the people that I work with cannot carry on a conversation, without every other word beginning with "F". In addition to a lack of civility, it also shows a lack of imagination. My own vocabulary is quite large and I can almost always find an appropriate verb, adverb or adjective, without resorting to profanity. This is not to say that I do not occasionally let fly, with a good, old-fashioned swear word. I generally reserve such language for painful injuries and in reference to ex-husbands.

(I DO refrain from referring to my ex-husband as a p***k - that's a part of a MAN and would be giving him too much credit).
post #14 of 18
Heidi/Barbara,

I think this all just proves that women can be as 'bad' as men.
My first reaction to the President of the U of Colorado, even before your post, was that she was primarily worried abt preserving the university's sports related revenues, even if that meant dis'ing a few sexual assault victims in the process.
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by katl8e
Personally, I deplore the lack of civility, these days. It seems that most of the people that I work with cannot carry on a conversation, without every other word beginning with "F". In addition to a lack of civility, it also shows a lack of imagination.
It has gotten worse over the past few decades, or is that just my imagination? Hip hop or rap or whatever it's currently called is very popular here, and I've found that I have to give my classes lessons in "what not to say", including "c**t". I don't want them to use some expressions once they're working. If they hear them all the time in "lyrics" or films, they seem to view them as perfectly innocuous.

I learned the hard way. Shortly after I met my husband, we went to a student hangout with several of his friends and their dates. Some guys at the next table were having a rather heated conversation, and I kept hearing a word I wasn't familiar with, F**ze, for you German speakers. I thought that it might be the German equivalent of "my old lady", and when somebody commented about the noise level at the next table, I asked what the word meant. Total silence! One friend's fiancee looked as if she was going to faint. One of my husband's friends is quite fluent in English, and whispered that it meant c***. My husband was mortified at first, since he wanted me to make a good impression on his friends, but then thought it was funny. He bought a German porn novel, gave it to me, and told me to ask HIM to explain any words I didn't understand. I did the same thing when we moved to the US, after he said, "I'll never learn this f****** language" in front of my grandmother and some of her "lady friends".
post #16 of 18
I find the C word much more offensive than the F word. The C word is used to reduce a woman to nothing more than her genetalia -- which wouldn't be so bad if the word did not also imply that a female's genetalia is a bad thing. When I used to work with prisoners, I was once called a Vampire B**ch, which the guys (and I) thought was really funny. But one day I was called a C*** and the guy who said that had the tar beat out of him by a bunch of the other prisoners for calling me that. If prisoners (these were murderers, rapists, crack dealers, etc) thought the C word was that bad, then it must be pretty horrific!

Does anyone remember George Carlin's list of the 10 words you can't say on TV? I will never forget him saying, "Why is it that you can prick your finger on TV, but you can't finger your p***k?"
post #17 of 18
Does anyone remember George Carlin's list of the 10 words you can't say on TV? I will never forget him saying, "Why is it that you can prick your finger on TV, but you can't finger your p***k?" [/quote]


Lol...yes....Renae..You just took me down memory lane!!!! When I saw the Vagina Monologes...every word imaginable was used to describe the vagina...and none of it was offensive...a lot depends on the context, and the feeling behind the speaker IMO. But when the C word is thrown around as an insult...watch my hair go on fire.

My favorite term from the vagina monologes was "down there"...what a hoot.

As a side note..about 10 yrs ago I bought my goddaughter a kids dictionary...penis was in the dictionary, testicle was in the dictionay...no vagina, and no ovary....hummm makes one think doesn't it. I could slap myself to this day for not writing the publisher.
post #18 of 18
GR. If any man ever directed such a term at me, well, he'd be missing a valuable part of his anatomy. Who is she trying to fool?!
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