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How young can a cat get pregnant?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hey, my bf's kitty is about 9 or 10 months... and she's getting rather thick in the belly! But her head is so small... I don't know. I've seen fat cats before and they look so much more different. It looks like it's all in her tummy and it's not soft or anything. How can I tell if she's pregnant? She has grown nipples too. So, to reiterate:

How young can a cat get pregnant? Is it possible mine is?

and

How can I tell if she truely is? We should start to prepare shouldn't we...
post #2 of 29
A cat can get pregnant at 5 to 6 months of age. I would really suggest you take your cat to the vet. They will be able to determine whether your cat is pregnant or not.

Here are some other posts to read:

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/sho...t=cat+pregnant

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/sho...t=cat+pregnant

http://www.thecatsite.com/forums/showthread.php?t=36112

Katie
post #3 of 29
I also found these articles...but I believe the best way to know for sure is really to have her checked over by a vet:

http://www.pets.ca/articles/article-expecting.htm

http://or.essortment.com/pregnantcats_rxcn.htm

Katie
post #4 of 29
Katie is absolutely right, she needs to see a vet soon.

She is most likely pregnant...please get her spayed as soon as possible.

If she is pregnant the vet can abort the pregnancy and spay at the same time. Or you can wait and let her have the kittens, your choice, but please remember that there are a ton of unwanted kittens out there already, more is not usually the best answer.

If she is not pregnant, please get her spayed so that she doesn't get pregnant.

Spotz
post #5 of 29
Katie has given you excellent advice there. The very first link will give you some ideas, other than a pregnancy, as to why her tummy may be big. It is possible for a kitten (and yes, she is still a kitten) to give birth succesfully but the dangers of complications are higher. The only way to definitely work out if she's pregnant is a vet visit or, if she's further along in her pregnancy, you will see the kittens moving.

If you decide to let her continue with the pregnancy, the other links will give you good advice about how to prepare for the birth and what to expect during delivery.
post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
We agree, if she's pregnant we'll spay her as soon as the kittens arrive. I know that first litters are usually only 3 kittens and my bf plans on keeping one, and I have a friend who really wants a kitten. So I think we'll be okay on this pregnancy. After that we'll have to fork out the bills to keep our cat (and others) healthy and happy. No worries there spotz, I can see you stressin.
post #7 of 29
Hey Angel....I know this is a bit OT (and premature until you know for sure)....but kittens really do well in pairs...so if your friend can take 2 if she doesn't already have a cat that would be best.

http://www.pawschicago.org/PetCare/catsinpairs.htm

Katie
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotz
Katie is absolutely right, she needs to see a vet soon.

She is most likely pregnant...please get her spayed as soon as possible.

If she is pregnant the vet can abort the pregnancy and spay at the same time.
Spotz
Nooooooooooooooooo!!!!
post #9 of 29
Cougar,

Spaying a pregnant cat happens all the time. If I get one here that shows up, if the cat is under a year old, I take her in and get her spayed right away. It is the responsible thing to do. With ALL the kittens and cats needing homes in the world, to bring more backyard kitties into the world is really insane. WE as humans have allowed this problem to reach epidemic proportions.

Spaying pregnant cats is an individual choice, and not for everyone. But to anyone who can do it and to all the vets who support it, I applaud all of them.
post #10 of 29
Brandon, I don't want this thread to turn into a debate about whether spaying a pregnant cat is ethical or not. The reality is that there are so, so many kittens born during kitten season and unless the owner can definitely find homes for the kittens (as is the case here), sometimes that is the best option. This cat is very young to be pregnant and giving birth and, as I said earlier, this presents a greater danger of complications for the mom-cat and kittens, such as a possible stillborn or a kitten getting lodged in the birth canal during birth, as well as a possibility that the mom-cat won't know how to care for her kittens.
post #11 of 29
Moving this to Health & Nutrition.
post #12 of 29
Edit: Our youngest went into season the first time at 5 months to the day. She was spayed 10 days later. My ears still hurt.

~Sue~


We agree. Spaying even if the cat is pregnant is the responsible thing to do.

Jeff & Sue
post #13 of 29
Angel_Kat, I just wanted to add that you need to wait until the kittens are weaned (around 8 weeks) before you spay the mom-cat. She can go into heat as early as a few days after giving birth so please keep her inside until you get her spayed.
post #14 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel_Kat
We agree, if she's pregnant we'll spay her as soon as the kittens arrive. I know that first litters are usually only 3 kittens and my bf plans on keeping one, and I have a friend who really wants a kitten. So I think we'll be okay on this pregnancy. After that we'll have to fork out the bills to keep our cat (and others) healthy and happy. No worries there spotz, I can see you stressin.
Not stressin...not really...just saddened by the unfortunate turn of events.

I'm glad you have homes for the kittens lined up, that's the best thing you can do. The flip side of this though, is that these kittens will potentially take the place of other kittens already looking/hoping for a home.

I know your intentions were not to breed. I know you didn't want her to have kittens. I know you really care about your kitty, and that you will do the best for her and her offspring that you can. And I respect your decision to let the pregnancy go to term, it is your perrogative to decide. Only thing I would like to ask of you, is to strongly consider both options.

Please make sure that all her kittens get S/N as soon as possible. (usually 8-10 weeks of age)

Hang in there with us and we'll all help you out with everything we can. The collective knowledge on this board is amazing, and the willingness of everyone to help each other is phenomonal.

Also please take her to the vet for a checkup as soon as you can, that way you can make sure that she is doing fine, and that there isn't any health concern for her or her kitties. She is young.

Spotz
post #15 of 29
She is very young, here's hoping it is a smooth delivery.
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
Ohh, you are all worrying me about this "so young to have babies" thing. Really think there could be problems??? Now you guys got ME stressin! So... she can try and get knocked up again right after giving birth? lol.. durty kats! But really.. how long are cats normally in heat for? I really want to take her to the vet but they cost so much money!! Just to check if there's anything even going on they pull so much from you.
post #17 of 29
Hey Angel...if you tell us where you live we can do a search for you of low cost clinics.

Katie
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angel_Kat
Ohh, you are all worrying me about this "so young to have babies" thing. Really think there could be problems??? Now you guys got ME stressin! So... she can try and get knocked up again right after giving birth? lol.. durty kats! But really.. how long are cats normally in heat for? I really want to take her to the vet but they cost so much money!! Just to check if there's anything even going on they pull so much from you.
We're not trying to alarm you, just helping

Any reputable/responsible breeder will wait at least a full year sometimes a few, before ever considering breeding a cat. While possible for them to get pregnant at mere months of age, they are still Kittens....we don't encourage 14 year old girls to get married and start a family, because their bodies are still developing. Same logic applies to any animal. She is young, problems are definately possible, and not unheard of. They are not highly probably, but I'm personally overly cautious of anything potentially health threatening.

Compared to human doctors, vets are usually pretty reasonable, but $$$ is still always an unpleasant thing to part with, so I understand your hesitation. But please seriously consider taking her to a vet and getting a clean bill of health. It is much easier to visit during normal business hours, than to have to scramble for an emergency visit...if that happens.

She will probably take a few weeks post delivery for her system to get back working, it won't be a long time at all though. This is a highly likely situation, I cannot stress the importance of keeping her seperated from the guys.

Spotz
post #19 of 29
Just to add, if she is preganant, you need to be feeding her a good quality kitten food throughout the pregnancy and while she is nursing.
post #20 of 29
My oldest cat Isabelle (10), who really adopted me, was pregnant around the same age as your cat is. So it is plausible that your cat is pregnant. I agree with everyone else that the best way to know for sure it's a pregnancy is to take her to the vet... That's what I did when this situation happened to me. I had no ideas cats got pregnant that early then next thing I knew I had 4 little kittens living in my closet! They were so cute too!
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well... We're going to take her into the vet as soon as we can. I suppose it's the only real thing we can do. I wish there was like... kitty-medicare or something lol, just to make it easier.

We're in New Westminster, BC. We've already looked up some of the low cost places, and one seems to be right up the street. Hopefully it won't cost too much! Cuz I'd be really peeved to go in there and pay that stupid $60-100 fee for a checkup and find out she's just getting chubby!

Thanks for all your help everyone Much appreciated.
post #22 of 29

This has been very interesting to read as Sasha's mama, SiSi, only made 1 big kitten and that was him, 12 years ago. SiSi was barely 6 months, and had just one, but gave him everything she had! Amusingly enough, she let him nurse for over a year and he grew to be 21 lbs. in size and they had a very close relationship until he was two and she got sick of him jumping on her all the time. But I never separated them, just got a bigger house!
I did get SiSi fixed 3 weeks after she gave birth to Sasha, and Sasha fixed at 5 months. I think you shoudl do what your heart and good judgement tells you to do!
post #23 of 29
Definitely keep the kitty indoors after she gives birth. I had a friend once who 'adopted' a feral baby, which turned into a kitten. Which got pregnant waaaayyy before she thought she was old enough to be spayed. Since the cat was still essentially feral, she stayed outside and unfortunately, was perpetually pregnant for about 2 years before I convinced my friend to abort the pregnancy and get the kitty spayed. And now their woods are crawling with ferals who are procreating at an amazing speed.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Feral is a stray cat right? Or a mutt? Angel is a mutt I believe. But she was given to us from babyhood. Does that make her feral? No right?
post #25 of 29
I had got my kitten from my boyfriend’s kitten. When I say kitten it's because she was around two and a half to three and a half months old. It was like babies having babies. That's so crazy. When they had got her from a friend they didn't know that she was pregnant. She looked normal and not fat, until she was giving birth on April 15th. So I guess even at a young age like that you can get pregnant.

Vanessa
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Feral is a stray cat right? Or a mutt? Angel is a mutt I believe. But she was given to us from babyhood. Does that make her feral? No right?
A feral cat is one that was once a stray...but over time has become more wild. I would really suggest you visit Alley Cat Allies website to learn more about feral and stray cats:

http://www.alleycat.org/index.html

Katie
post #27 of 29
I've seen cats get pregnant as young as 4months...truely Babies having babies.

Unless there is a true medical reason against surgery, cats are considered by every major veterinary organization, and by most veterinarians, to be safe to S/N at the age of 8 weeks.

Angel_Kat, Please keep us updated on your kitty.

Spotz
post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well, she's healthy and happy, still playing and taking adventures outside. We've started moving things around: my bf used to keep some of his clothes in little baskets underneath his couches and we realized that soon they may be a good nesting ground.

I was wondering, do cats normally prefer to have their babies indoors? I suddenly have a fear that Angel is going to decide to have them outdoors, and then I won't know what to do! I don't think I'd be able to find them.

We tried setting up a blanket it a basket for her but she doesn't seem interested in that...
post #29 of 29
You should keep her inside from now on and especially after she delivers her kittens. Once the last kitten is born, she will go into heat again about 48 hours later so she needs to be inside.

Give her a nice wide cardboard box with low enough sides that she can easily jump in and out of , but once the kittens are born they can't fall out of. Pad it well with soft clean bedding, place it is a dark and quiet room somewhere that is free of drafts. Make sure you have a litter pan in the room, not to close to the box, but not that far away either. Once she starts feeling the urge she will begin nesting, and she will want a private, warm place to have her kittens.
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