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For or against daylight savings time?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Europe is going to lose an hour's sleep tonight. I wonder why there's a week's discrepancy between the EU and the US? Anyway, I don't really see the purpose of it, since energy really isn't saved. We're far enough north that it's light out until 9 or 10 in the summer. And why can't they do it on a Saturday morning, so that most people can adjust that extra day?
post #2 of 29
We don't have it in PR. The anexionists tried to establish it in 2001 with a law project in 2000 but when they lost the election the new government scrapped the law.
post #3 of 29
I love the extra hour of daylight in the evening.
post #4 of 29
One of the rationales for keeping it now is safety with regards to school children. If time is not changed you may have kids going off to school when it is still dark.
post #5 of 29
Children going off to school when it's dark? Boy is that a sight. At least that's here in the tropics where the amount of daylight is more even. Here the farthest you get is twilight in 7 PM. I guess that's why we never even bother to try that.

When you are from the tropics and go farther north it feels just plain weird to see the sun still up and your clock reading 8 PM... I have that experience and it feels kind of crazy.
post #6 of 29
I don't like it at all .
It is like they are trying to change the nature , well they can't . And it has sure not inproved anything , so why change .
post #7 of 29

I never really understood the need for it, but I do love the extra daylight, especially in the summer.
post #8 of 29
I'm with Chester&Piper. I don't see any practical purpose, but long summer evenings certainly are pleasant.
post #9 of 29
I found this nice site about the advantages of daylight saving time.

http://www.energy.ca.gov/daylightsaving.html

SAVING TIME, SAVING ENERGY
Daylight Saving Time, Its History and Why We Use It

by
Bob Aldrich, Webmaster
(and Former Information Officer)
California Energy Commission


Spring forward...Fall back....
It's ingrained in our consciousness almost as much as the A-B-Cs or our spelling reminder of "i before e...." And it's a regular event, though perhaps a bit less regular than the swallows coming back to Capistrano.

Yet in those four words is a whole collection of trivia, facts and common sense about Daylight Saving Time.

Daylight Saving Time begins for most of the United States at 2 a.m. on the first Sunday of April (see chart below). Time reverts to standard time at 2 a.m. on the last Sunday of October.

Daylight Saving Time -- for the U.S. and its territories -- is NOT observed in Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Eastern Time Zone portion of the State of Indiana, and by most of Arizona (with the exception of the Navajo Indian Reservation in Arizona).

California has not yet received federal "approval" to move to a "year-round" Daylight Saving Time in 2001-2002. (See below.)

According to Mining Co. Guide to Geography, DST is also observed in about 70 countries:




Other parts of the world observe Daylight Saving Time as well. While European nations have been taking advantage of the time change for decades, in 1996 the European Union (EU) standardized a EU-wide "summertime period." The EU version of Daylight Saving Time runs from the last Sunday in March through the last Sunday in October. During the summer, Russia's clocks are two hours ahead of standard time. During the winter, all 11 of the Russian time zones are an hour ahead of standard time. During the summer months, Russian clocks are advanced another hour ahead. With their high latitude, the two hours of Daylight Saving Time really helps to save daylight. In the southern hemisphere where summer comes in December, Daylight Saving Time is observed from October to March. Equatorial and tropical countries (lower latitudes) don't observe Daylight Saving Time since the daylight hours are similar during every season, so there's no advantage to moving clocks forward during the summer.


Daylight Saving Time Saves Energy

One of the biggest reasons we change our clocks to Daylight Saving Time (DST) is that it saves energy. Energy use and the demand for electricity for lighting our homes is directly connected to when we go to bed and when we get up. Bedtime for most of us is late evening through the year. When we go to bed, we turn off the lights and TV.
In the average home, 25 percent of all the electricity we use is for lighting and small appliances, such as TVs, VCRs and stereos. A good percentage of energy consumed by lighting and appliances occurs in the evening when families are home. By moving the clock ahead one hour, we can cut the amount of electricity we consume each day.

Studies done in the 1970s by the U.S. Department of Transportation show that we trim the entire country's electricity usage by about one percent EACH DAY with Daylight Saving Time.

Daylight Saving Time "makes" the sun "set" one hour later and therefore reduces the period between sunset and bedtime by one hour. This means that less electricity would be used for lighting and appliances late in the day.

We also use less electricity because we are home fewer hours during the "longer" days of spring and summer. Most people plan outdoor activities in the extra daylight hours. When we are not at home, we don't turn on the appliances and lights. A poll done by the U.S. Department of Transportation indicated that Americans liked Daylight Saving Time because "there is more light in the evenings / can do more in the evenings."

While the amounts of energy saved per household are small...added up they can be very large.

In the winter, the afternoon Daylight Saving Time advantage is offset by the morning's need for more lighting. In spring and fall, the advantage is less than one hour. So, Daylight Saving Time saves energy for lighting in all seasons of the year except for the four darkest months of the year (November, December, January and February) when the afternoon advantage is offset by the need for lighting because of late sunrise.

A study was released in May 2001 by the State of California's Energy Commission to see if creating an early DST or going to a year-round DST will help with the electricity problems the state faced in 2000-2001-2002. To download a copy of the study, Effects of Daylight Saving Time on California Electricity Use, please look for: Publication # 400-01-13


In May 2001, the California state legislature sent a Senate Joint Resolution (SJRX2 1) to the White House and Congress asking that California be allowed to extend Daylight Saving Time year round. The resolution can be viewed at: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/bill/s...haptered.html. However, as of the end of September 2001, Congress and the White House have not acted on the request, and may not in light of the world-changing events of September 11, 2001.

But why do we have Daylight Saving Time to begin with? Who created the laws and regulations that we follow?


History of Daylight Saving Time
Daylight Saving Time is a change in the standard time of each time zone. Time zones were first used by the railroads in 1883 to standardize their schedules. According to the The Canadian Encyclopedia Plus by McClelland & Stewart Inc., Canada's "[Sir Sandford] Fleming also played a key role in the development of a worldwide system of keeping time. Trains had made obsolete the old system where major cities and regions set clocks according to local astronomical conditions. Fleming advocated the adoption of a standard or mean time and hourly variations from that according to established time zones. He was instrumental in convening an International Prime Meridian Conference in Washington in 1884 at which the system of international standard time -- still in use today -- was adopted."
In 1918, the U.S. Congress made the U.S. rail zones official under federal law and gave the responsibility to make any changes to the Interstate Commerce Commission, the only federal transportation regulatory agency at the time. When Congress created the Department of Transportation in 1966, it transferred the responsibility for the time laws to the new department.

The American law by which we turn our clock forward in the spring and back in the fall is known as the Uniform Time Act of 1966. The law does not require that anyone observe Daylight Saving Time; all the law says is that if we are going to observe Daylight Saving Time, it must be done uniformly.

Daylight Saving Time has been around for most of this century and even earlier.

Benjamin Franklin, while a minister to France, first suggested the idea in an essay titled "An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light." The essay was first published in the Journal de Paris in April 1784. But it wasn't for more than a century later that an Englishman, William Willett, suggested it again in 1907.

Willett was reportedly passing by a home where the shades were down, even though the sun was up. He wrote a pamphlet called "The Waste of Daylight" because of his observations.

Willett wanted to move the clock ahead by 80 minutes in four moves of 20 minutes each during the spring and summer months. In 1908, the British House of Commons rejected advancing the clock by one hour in the spring and back again in the autumn.

Willett's idea didn't die, and it culminated in the introduction of British Summer Time by an Act of Parliament in 1916. Clocks were put one hour ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) during the summer months.

England recognized that the nation could save energy and changed their clocks during the first World War.

In 1918, in order to conserve resources for the war effort, the U.S. Congress placed the country on Daylight Saving Time for the remainder of WW I. It was observed for seven months in 1918 and 1919. The law, however, proved so unpopular that it was later repealed.

When America went to war again, Congress reinstated Daylight Saving Time on February 2, 1942. Time in the U.S. was advanced one hour to save energy. It remained advanced one hour forward year-round until September 30, 1945.

In England, the energy saving aspects of Daylight Saving were recognized again during WWII. Clocks were changed two hours ahead of GMT during the summer, which became known as Double Summer Time. But it didn't stop with the summer. During the war, clocks remained one hour ahead of GMT though the winter.

From 1945 to 1966, there was no U.S. law about Daylight Saving Time. So, states and localities were free to observe Daylight Saving Time or not.

This, however, caused confusion -- especially for the broadcasting industry, and for trains and buses. Because of the different local customs and laws, radio and TV stations and the transportation companies had to publish new schedules every time a state or town began or ended Daylight Saving Time.

By 1966, some 100 million Americans were observing Daylight Saving Time through their own local laws and customs. Congress decided to step in end the confusion and establish one pattern across the country. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 (15 U.S. Code Section 260a) created Daylight Saving Time to begin on the last Sunday of April and to end on the last Sunday of October. Any area that wanted to be exempt from Daylight Saving Time could do so by passing a local ordinance. The law was amended in 1986 to begin Daylight Saving Time on the first Sunday in April.





Embargo Changes Daylight Saving Time
Following the 1973 Arab Oil Embargo, Congress put most of the nation on extended Daylight Saving Time for two years in hopes of saving additional energy. This experiment worked, but Congress did not continue the experiment in 1975 because of opposition -- mostly from the farming states.
In 1974, Daylight Saving Time lasted ten months and lasted for eight months in 1975, rather than the normal six months (then, May to October). The U.S. Department of Transportation -- which has jurisdiction over Daylight Saving Time in the U.S. -- studied the results of the experiment. It concluded:


Daylight Saving Time saves energy. Based on consumption figures for 1974 and 1975, The Department of Transportation says observing Daylight Saving Time in March and April saved the equivalent in energy of 10,000 barrels of oil each day -- a total of 600,000 barrels in each of those two years. California Energy Commission studies confirm a saving of about one percent per day.

Daylight Saving Time saves lives and prevents traffic injuries. The earlier Daylight Saving Time allowed more people to travel home from work and school in daylight, which is much safer than darkness. And except for the months of November through February, Daylight Saving Time does not increase the morning hazard for those going to school and work.

Daylight Saving Time prevents crime. Because people get home from work and school and complete more errands and chores in daylight, Daylight Saving Time also seems to reduce people's exposure to various crimes, which are more common in darkness than in light.


The Department of Transportation estimated that 50 lives were saved and about 2,000 injuries were prevented in March and April of the study years. The department also estimated that $28 million was saved in traffic accident costs.
Newer studies, however, reportedly challenge the earlier claims of safety and crime prevention under DST. Further research probably is warranted.


Congress and President Reagan Change Daylight Saving Time
Daylight Saving Time was changed slightly in 1986 when President Reagan signed Public Law 99-359. It changed Daylight Saving Time from the last Sunday in April to the first Sunday in April. No change was made to the ending date of the last Sunday in October.
This was done ostensibly to conserve energy during the month of April. Adding the entire month of April is estimated to save nationwide about 300,000 barrels of oil each year.


More About TIME

Many countries observe Daylight Saving Time. But the beginning and ending dates are often different than those used in the United States.
The book, The Official Airline Guide, is one of the best sources of information about whether or not Daylight Saving Time is observed in another country.

You can find out more information about Daylight Saving Time by writing TIME, c/o Office of General Counsel, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. 20590.

Another Web site about DST can be found at: http://www.webexhibits.com/daylightsaving/, which is a public service of the Institute for Dynamic Educational Advancement (IDEA) by WebExhibits as a compliment to www.time.gov.

The U.S. Naval Observatory's Web site gives the current time for all time zones, and it's free. Go to: http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/timer.pl. Note, however, that with Internet traffic and delays on servers and browsers, that the correct time may be off a few seconds or more.

For the correct time of the day, you can call the Department of Transportation at 900-410-TIME. There is a charge for the call. Or check with your local phone company to see if there is a local dial up time service such as "POP-CORN."

Some phone companies also have a local number you can call for the current correct local time. Call directory assistance in your area for the number to call for the correct time.

One question people always ask about Daylight Saving Time regards the time that restaurants and bars close. In many states, liquor cannot be served after 2 a.m. But at 2 a.m. in the fall, the time switches back one hour. So, why can't they serve for that additional hour in October?

The answer: the bars do not close at 2 a.m. but actually at 1:59 a.m. So, they are already closed when the time changes from Daylight Saving Time into Standard Time.

Final observations:


It is Daylight Saving (singular) Time, NOT Daylight SavingS Time. We are saving daylight, so it is singular and not plural.

Daylight Saving Time differs in other areas of the world. Consult a good encyclopedia for additional information about DST in your own country. Or check out the "World Time Zone" or the "WorldTime" Web pages at:

www.worldtimezone.com/daylight.html
www.worldtimeserver.com/

www.worldtime.com




Thanks for all your e-mail! We are amazed that this page gets so much attention, usually twice a year. While we appreciate the e-mail, we can not answer a lot of your specific questions. For example, we do not have the ability to tell you whether DST was practiced on a specific date or by a specific region/state/city/town in the past. Check out microfilm or old printed copies of your local newspapers around early April and late October of the years you are interested in. They will usually have stories or reminders about setting your clock. Those papers are a good indicator. Your local libraries should be able to help you with the microfilmed or printed copies of the old newspapers.

If you are interested in changing DST, either abolishing it or having it extended year-round....please do not contact the California Energy Commission. We have no jurisdiction over DST. Instead, contact your state's elected officials or your Congressional representatives. you can also contact the U.S. Dept of transportation in Washington, D.C.
post #10 of 29
I remember loving DST when I was a kid, because we were allowed to stay out in the neighborhood until dark during the summer. Nowadays, I pretty much don't care one way or the other.
post #11 of 29
I'm all for it,i like when it stays light til 9pm in the summer
post #12 of 29
I love the extra daylight in the summer, too. But since we turn the clocks back in the fall, wouldn't it all work out the same in the end if we sprang ahead, then didn't fall behind?
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by chelle
I'm all for it,i like when it stays light til 9pm in the summer
Me too.
post #14 of 29
Against!

It's probably wonderful and does save electricity for those living in cooler climates, but here in South Texas DST just means it's HOT that much later at night, and impossible to sleep unless you blast the A/C and get light-blocking shades. More daylight hours in the evening here actually mean more electricity use b/c of sun-related heat. And an air conditioner uses a lot more power than a light bulb.

Perhaps they could just have DST in the northern states?
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by tuxedokitties
Against!

It's probably wonderful and does save electricity for those living in cooler climates, but here in South Texas DST just means it's HOT that much later at night, and impossible to sleep unless you blast the A/C and get light-blocking shades. More daylight hours in the evening here actually mean more electricity use b/c of sun-related heat. And an air conditioner uses a lot more power than a light bulb.

Perhaps they could just have DST in the northern states?
I wonder if the studies took the prevalence of central air conditioning into account? Recent studies here in Germany have shown no savings, but I think it's because we're so much farther north than the U.S.. In midsummer, we have 16 or 17 hours of daylight; in winter often less than 8 hours. The benefits really depend on latitude.
post #16 of 29
AGAINST!!!!!!!

I have a hard enough time getting to sleep as it is without messing up my body clock, I'm like the walking dead today, and I'll be off kilter until the weekend. This year I went to bed at 9 (on a Saturday night!!!) in a bid to outfox daylight savings but I failed miserably
post #17 of 29
I always look forward to daylight savings time. There is always so much more to do activity wise in the summer. I live near the beach so alot of our activities involve the water. I really enjoy it staying light until almost 9:00 at night because then there is still plenty of daylight to enjoy when I get off work.
post #18 of 29
It's odd, where we used to live (Alaska) we never even noticed the change because it is light almost 19 hours a day during April where we were. Moving down to Oregon we noticed the change right away. Interesting article thy- thanks for sharing it.
post #19 of 29
I prefer the lighter nights to be longer as well.
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by hissy
It's odd, where we used to live (Alaska) we never even noticed the change because it is light almost 19 hours a day during April where we were. Moving down to Oregon we noticed the change right away. Interesting article thy- thanks for sharing it.
I can't even start to imagine 19 hours of light . Guess we are too far south (Lat. 18 N).
post #21 of 29
I've lived in Indiana my whole life and all the daylight savings does is confuse me since we dont change anything..
post #22 of 29
I don't care for it. But then again I'm not much of a spring/summer person. I don't care much for it being dark at 5pm either like it is in the fall. My ideal time for turning darker would probably be around 6-7pm. Lisa & Sash


http://pages.ivillage.com/lisalee992 (Sash's website)
post #23 of 29
I hate DST, I wish they would do away with it. Indiana doesn't have it, maybe I should move there
post #24 of 29
I voted for not caring...because I really don't...BUT I love getting the extra light in the evening. I started waking up and hour earlier for 2 weeks before the time change...but as soon as we changed it...I actually got more sleep! YEA! and now...I sleep better!
post #25 of 29
Against
Its nothing but a pain.
post #26 of 29
I don't really mind. I love having sun until 9:45PM in the summer and I love waking up to dark!
post #27 of 29
I'm for it, but, I think it ought to take place in 15 minute increments over a 4 month period, starting, say, in December. That way by the time spring does roll around, we have the extra sunshine in the afternoon, and it's not so hard to adjust.
post #28 of 29
The real reason for Daylight Savings Time, and the reason it came about in the first place is that it gives farmers more time to work with the sun.

And we all reap the benefits!
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynx
The real reason for Daylight Savings Time, and the reason it came about in the first place is that it gives farmers more time to work with the sun.

And we all reap the benefits!
True. But here in Saskatchewan we don't change time and we have plenty of farmers

I tell you dst is a pain. You get used to a time when your favorite shows are on and wham they change time and I keep missing them.
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