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Outdoor cat in hospital, VET at a loss - Page 2

post #31 of 50

Ohhh, I'm so sorry to hear this happened to Harry and you.  I don't have any input except to ask if you have another vet option in your area.  I've had a pet seriously misdiagnosed before by human error and ignorance at a vet, and it cost a lot to treat the animal for a disease she did not have.  I definitely understand your anger at them just now discovering the real problem after all this time, testing and effort.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenQ View Post
 

UTI's are common and rarely an emergency. There are many ways to practice good medicine and still not get it right 100% of the time as each patient is different and reasonable decisions can sometimes lead to bad results.  Any vet who opens his practice for you on a sat night is doing an extraordinary thing, my suggestion is to keep your vet an ally and work with him.  Your cats biggest statistical risk to his health is going outside and your vet can't control that.

I agree with this a hundred percent.

post #33 of 50
Thread Starter 

Hi, Has anyone had the problem of sand in the bladder?   I cannot find anything about sand.....just crystals?

 

Thanks for replies and for sure this is the end of this Vet.  Which has supposed to be 'the best'.   

 

Thank you :) 

post #34 of 50

Hi @Harry028

 

I think by sand your vet must mean crystals. They are also sometimes called bladder stones. That will be why you were having so much trouble teaching him to use the litter box. Not only was he having trouble controlling his bladder but he felt pain every time he tried to pee, which made him avoid the litter.

 

Once this problem is under control it should be easy enough to litter train him.

 

Crystals are usually caused by dietary imbalance or insufficient water intake. They can be caused by UTI's as well. The way they are treated depends on the kind of crystals he has. Your vet will need to make sure what caused the crystals before prescribing antibiotics. These will work with a bacterial UTI but if his crystals were caused by a stress-induced UTI, for example, they won't have any effect.

 

Hopefully something as simple as a change of diet will be all that he needs. If he is still peeing outside the box could you keep him confined to one room? A small bathroom with puppy pads on the floor will be OK for a few days. Just so you don't have to follow him around cleaning up after him.

 

I just wanted to add that it really would be much better for Harry if you can keep him indoors, or at least restrict him to your house and an outdoor enclosure. For one thing it will be a lot easier to recognise another flare-up of bladder problems if he is using a litter box. If he is peeing outside you have no way of knowing how much or how often he pees. 

post #35 of 50
Thread Starter 

Hi, a few questions please.....  

I agree with everything you said and I now wonder how long it was going on until he went down with a fever.

 

When the vet said it was sand, i said do you mean crystals?  She said no, first comes crystals, then sand then stones.   So that part has me confused, as I can't find anything on 'sand' in bladder.    What is your opinion of that?  

 

How will they determine the type of crystals to be treated?  Just so I know that they are doing the right thing.

 

How will vet find out what caused the crystals before prescribing antibiotics ?   How would they know if it's stress induced?

 

Sorry for all the questions, but since we are so close to making him well, I don't want any more mistakes.....so I want to have the right questions and know what type of answers I should receive.

 

Thank you very, very much. 

post #36 of 50

OK...passing your questions off to the experts, but hanging in here and cheering you on, and sending lots of  good  :vibes::vibes: :vibes: :vibes::vibes:to poor Charlie.

 

 Look,  for some reason, vets in the British Isles seem to think that cats are miserable indoors.  The exact opposite hold true in the USA.  Here, the thought is that an outdoor cat is far more likely to get into serious trouble, or pick up diseases from other, unvaccinated cats.  I do know that the average lifespan of an outdoor cat here is 4-7 years, but an indoor cat can expect to live 7-15 years, and many go well beyond that into their 20s.  That speaks volumes.  And once he is neutered and the drive to be out tomcatting around is gone he will settle into house life just fine.  AND, as @Norachan said, if he is in, you can monitor his potty habits and head a problem off at the pass before it gets bad again.  

post #37 of 50
Thread Starter 

Hoping  I can get answers to the questions prior to meeting vet again today.  

 

Thank you for the encouragement!!!  

post #38 of 50

I've heard of crystals and stones, but not sand. I guess your vet is referring to the same thing but differentiating between the size?

 

dontknow.gif

 

The vet will take samples and send them off to the lab to determine exactly what kind of crystals/sand he has. 

 

This article goes into more detail.

 

 http://www.petmd.com/cat/conditions/urinary/c_ct_crystalluria?page=show

 

If Harry has a fever that would indicate an infection, whether from the UTI or something else. I'm not a vet, but to me it would make sense to prescribe antibiotics to clear up the infection while waiting for the test results on whatever is causing the crystals/sand.

 

Hope everything goes well at the vets, please let us know what they say.

post #39 of 50

Goodness, yes, keep us posted!  You're part of us here, now.

post #40 of 50
Well, having sand is better than stones, which is just a size difference.

My cat had surgery for oxalate stones and it took 2 trips for the vet to determine that it wAs more than the standard UTI.

Your cat may need pain meds as it hurts to pee. Additionally, he might want something that will help him relax. my vets have told me that the bladder is generally one of the first organs that will react to a stressed out cat.

Personally, i would not be ok with antibiotics for an entire year as your vet suggested. I would ask why the infection would hang around so long. My cat certainly never took antibiotics for that long and she had surgery!

I too would keep Harry indoors, if for no other reason than you just spent a lot of money and you need to make sure it was well spent! On a more serious note, you need to keep an eye on him and know his peeing pattern.

Harry will eventually quit complaining about inside once he realizes you won't budge. Just stiffen your spine. it's hard, I know.
post #41 of 50
Thread Starter 

Harry has FLUTD, blood still in urine as of this morning.

 

We have him home here as of an hour ago....have to bring him back on Monday for check.  They said they have never

had a case like Harry.....which kinda freaks me out.

 

He was on a catheter from Monday until last night, Friday.  They flushed him through the catheter, not IV fluid.

 

I read on here that he should have been going on his own before he was sent home, but they said they'd rather see how he 

is home from now until Monday. 

 

He is on a total wet food diet....Royal Canin Urinary  S/D.  On Monday they are changing to Hills urinary as they said it is better (out of stock today).

They said 1.5 pouch morning and again at night.

 

Have been mashing it with water and he is eating all & drinking the water no problem.  Very hungry.   He hasn't used the box yet....so really hoping he does.

 

Poor guy is still not right, I can tell.  He is probably afraid to urinate with the pain, after the catheter and all.   Of course, he wants to go out, but that is not happening.

 

Any advice to ease his fear or pain?

 

Will start reading on FLUTD and tips.... Thank you! 

post #42 of 50

Just lots of love and affection, if he is comfortable with it.  The WORST thing about having a beloved animal sick is NOT being able to explain to them what is going on, why things are being done to them, and that it will get better.  Lots of :vibes: headed your way!

post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry028 View Post
 

Harry has FLUTD, blood still in urine as of this morning.

 

We have him home here as of an hour ago....have to bring him back on Monday for check.  They said they have never

had a case like Harry.....which kinda freaks me out.

 

He was on a catheter from Monday until last night, Friday.  They flushed him through the catheter, not IV fluid.

 

I read on here that he should have been going on his own before he was sent home, but they said they'd rather see how he 

is home from now until Monday. 

 

He is on a total wet food diet....Royal Canin Urinary  S/D.  On Monday they are changing to Hills urinary as they said it is better (out of stock today).

They said 1.5 pouch morning and again at night.

 

Have been mashing it with water and he is eating all & drinking the water no problem.  Very hungry.   He hasn't used the box yet....so really hoping he does.

 

Poor guy is still not right, I can tell.  He is probably afraid to urinate with the pain, after the catheter and all.   Of course, he wants to go out, but that is not happening.

 

Any advice to ease his fear or pain?

 

Will start reading on FLUTD and tips.... Thank you! 

 

I think you said at the beginning of this thread that  Harry would not use a litter box.  If he's still resisting a box --

 

Did you ever try putting dirt, leaves. or grass in a box?

Once he sees the box as a familiar surface, you can try layering with cat litter and maybe switching it over.

 

That has worked for some people with cats that have only used the outdoors.

post #44 of 50

Poor old guy, I'm sorry to hear he is still suffering. Did the vet give him any pain killers?

post #45 of 50

How is he today?

post #46 of 50
Thread Starter 

Back in Hospital today.  He came home Saturday afternoon and first urine was 24 hours later.  

 

He was very, very, very hungry.....played for first time in a long time.  Cried a lot, one cry to get out, 

one in pain to urinate.  No problem putting a lot of water in his food.  He didn't even try the new water

fountain I bought him.  

 

He was in good form....the best he's been in ages. 

 

2 of the urine was size of half dollar.....the rest were small nuggets.   He did a lot of the nuggets.

 

This morning we found he had leaked during the night and was walking & leaking.  He did use the box, but

again nuggets.

 

I bought Rescue Remedy this morning and put a tiny bit on his head, behind his ears and tail.  Did seem to relax him.

 

He did something he never has done before.....sitting in window, he saw something and ran like mad to hide.  Stayed there

for an hour each time he did it.  In the past, he'd only go hiding if he was playing.   

 

Brought back to Vet and she said there was too much urine...she tried to express it, but couldn't for fear of bursting something.

 

He's catheterized again and a drip put on.....still on antibiotics 3 weeks now and anti-inflam.  She said she doesn't know

at this point what to think.  Will go visit him tomorrow and talk again.

 

I ordered Felliway spray, but have to wait for my cousin to mail to me from UK as Amazon wouldn't post to Ireland, as it's liquid.  

 

We are so sad, as he really seemed better, coat great, eyes bright, lying on his back to play......  

 

All thoughts welcome....Thank you. 

post #47 of 50

Oh shoot.  I’ve been following Harry’s story, bless his little heart, and yours too.

I hope that he is just stopping up because of some swelling from the catheters.  I had a Blue Persian a boyfriend at the time had gifted me back in 1980.  Poor kitty had the same back-to-back blockages and constant revolving door trips to the vet to be cathetered so he could urinate.

The vet finally told me that my cat was born with a ureter tube which was simply too narrow to pass normal sized particles in the urine.  (May explain why your vet is using the word “sand”?)   He suggested a surgery which was indelicately described to me as essentially castrating the cat’s penis in order to leave a wider opening for urine to pass.  There really was no other option, other than to put the cat down because he would never be able to pass normal urine without blockage.  The surgery left my kitty with a constant dripping of urine which he couldn’t control.  So we went from constant blockage to constant leaking.  It was not a good outcome.

Like I said, I hope Harry’s recurrent blockages are just from a little swelling and that he can get flushed out and finally heal.  If your vet recommends a ureter surgery, you'll want to ask about frequency of side effects (like dripping).  I’m not sure if the vet botched the surgery or if the dripping was a “normal” result which I was not made aware of before electing surgery.  They have probably (hopefully) improved the surgery over the last 40 years.

​Prayers and good vibes to you and Harry.

post #48 of 50

@Orange&White  Yes, the surgery to repair has improved tremendously over the past few years.  Like with all surgeries, the more they are done, the more vets know about how to finesse the surgeries.  Very few cats have issues afterwards, although, as with any surgery, a small number have complications.

 

 I did some digging on the surgery at well-respected veterinary school sites.  Most of the articles were very detailed and meant for those with medical backgrounds, but I found the below link that covers all the bases in layman's terms, should you and your vet decide this is a way to go, @Harry028

 

 http://www.petplace.com/article/cats/diseases-conditions-of-cats/surgeries/what-is-a-perineal-urethrostomy

post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamanyt1953 View Post
 

@Orange&White  Yes, the surgery to repair has improved tremendously over the past few years.  Like with all surgeries, the more they are done, the more vets know about how to finesse the surgeries.  Very few cats have issues afterwards, although, as with any surgery, a small number have complications.

 

 I did some digging on the surgery at well-respected veterinary school sites.  Most of the articles were very detailed and meant for those with medical backgrounds, but I found the below link that covers all the bases in layman's terms, should you and your vet decide this is a way to go, @Harry028

 

 http://www.petplace.com/article/cats/diseases-conditions-of-cats/surgeries/what-is-a-perineal-urethrostomy


​That's good to know.  I hoped that 40 years of medical advances had improved that surgery, or that it had been entirely replaced with something less invasive.

 

Still hoping Harry can get better soon without additional procedures.

post #50 of 50

Still nothing better to replace it, but the upside is that cats don't suffer any psychological ill-effects from the surgery.  

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