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Which cat am I?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hello to everyone. It's been a long time since my last post, and I don't know if this is the right forum section to post this request. If it belongs to another forum, please be so kind as to move it there.

 

Hopefully, my petless days are closer to an end, so I need some input from experts, and not programmed selectors, to help me choose my future adopted cat.

 

I come from a dog background, but my dog was a peculiar one: a six year old retired show Rottweiler (female). I was the only person in the house with whom she bonded (which is a no brainer, since I was two years old and the dog was a "She"). Even with me she was very laid back. Not aloof, just dignified and a bit reserved. She was kind with me but in a very cool, gentle way. And of course, she was very well behaved.

 

And I really liked, and still like, that kind of character in a pet. I've realized that I'm both a Cat and a Dog Person. So I've spent hours and hours researching and trying to figure out which cat breed would be a good fit for me. Basically I'd love to adopt: 

 

- A cat that likes to interact with the owner, but would be fine with some time alone too.

- A cat with a "middle of the road" temperament.

- A healthy and hardy breed.

- Hair lenght, patterns and shedding are not an issue.

- I'm not a terribly active person. I like to spend some time reading or watching TV, and have the cat besides me, or nearby.

- Preferably, it should be a breed that tolerates, at least, dogs.

 

So I'm basically trying to decide which of the following friends I will bring home one day (in no particular order):

 

American Shirthair.

British Shorthair.

Maine Coon.

Norwegian Forest Cat.

Russian Blue.

 

Any comment or suggestion will be very much appreciated. Thank you very much.

post #2 of 13

If I was you I would browse through all the local shelters and cat rescues see if any

kitty grabs you :heart3: purebreds come and go all the time. Sounds like you want a mature

independent not to needy kitty. Fixing /microchipping is already included in adoption price.

 

BTW better to get two so they have each other for company, it's double the fun for you.

You can trick train them, leash train walk them same as a dog ;) 

post #3 of 13
Yup both my guys are rescues and both are dog like in temperament. You probably want to look at 1year+ for age. With adults what you see is what you get. There are many good tempered adult cats in shelters looking for homes.
post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganesha0 View Post
 

Hello to everyone. It's been a long time since my last post, and I don't know if this is the right forum section to post this request. If it belongs to another forum, please be so kind as to move it there.

 

Hopefully, my petless days are closer to an end, so I need some input from experts, and not programmed selectors, to help me choose my future adopted cat.

 

I come from a dog background, but my dog was a peculiar one: a six year old retired show Rottweiler (female). I was the only person in the house with whom she bonded (which is a no brainer, since I was two years old and the dog was a "She"). Even with me she was very laid back. Not aloof, just dignified and a bit reserved. She was kind with me but in a very cool, gentle way. And of course, she was very well behaved.

 

And I really liked, and still like, that kind of character in a pet. I've realized that I'm both a Cat and a Dog Person. So I've spent hours and hours researching and trying to figure out which cat breed would be a good fit for me. Basically I'd love to adopt: 

 

- A cat that likes to interact with the owner, but would be fine with some time alone too.

- A cat with a "middle of the road" temperament.

- A healthy and hardy breed.

- Hair lenght, patterns and shedding are not an issue.

- I'm not a terribly active person. I like to spend some time reading or watching TV, and have the cat besides me, or nearby.

- Preferably, it should be a breed that tolerates, at least, dogs.

 

So I'm basically trying to decide which of the following friends I will bring home one day (in no particular order):

 

American Shirthair.

British Shorthair.

Maine Coon.

Norwegian Forest Cat.

Russian Blue.

 

Any comment or suggestion will be very much appreciated. Thank you very much.

 

 

You are probably an American Short Hair. 

 

Caveat: I have no direct knowledge of British Short Hairs.

 

Maine Coons are delightful, however these big fellows come with their issues, as do many of the ancestors of the cold climate cats of Northern European descent, and the Norwegian Forest Cat is subject to most of the same maladies.  Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, and hip dysplasia (especially in larger specimens) plague both breeds.  Polycystic Kidney Disease is seen in the Maine Coon Cat, and Glycogen Storage Disease type IV in the Norwegian Forest Cat.

 

Russian Blues aren't prone to any genetic-based diseases, although they will eat you out of house and home if you allow it, and will grow heavy in fairly short order.

 

On the other hand, the American Short Hair has the broadest gene pool of any cat today; they'll tolerate Georgia Summers very well, and every shelter in America is overcrowded with these sweethearts.  Somewhere close by, there's a cat who's just waiting for you to adopt him or her, and to make both your Lives the better for it..

 

.

post #5 of 13
Yes my Indy is an American Short hair (according to her vet anyways) she is very playful and will hunt anything from ankles to her own tail (her tail is double jointed). Very active.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much for your replies.

@Seventhheaven
@IndyJones

I know, and I'm also considering shelter/rescued/fostered cats. It's too sad to see so many pets neglected and abandoned. Mixed breeds have the largest gene pool and are the healthiest cats. Adults already have their temperament defined, so the are predictable. Needless to say, I'll adopt a pair. Even our independent Rottweiler became upset whenever the rest of the family took too long to ackowledge her presence. She was dignified and reserved, but not asocial. I was always there with her smile.gif

@1CatOverTheLine

This might sound silly, nevertheless, I confess that there's a certain "something" about the American Short Hair that tells me, very loudly, take me home! smile.gif
post #7 of 13
One problem I see with choosing a certain breed because you want specific traits is that there are no guarantees. A breed may have a reputation for personality traits that you like, but cats are still individuals. So you choose a breed that is supposedly laid back but you could end up with the one cat who uses your house as a race track.

Adopting an older cat from a shelter gives you a better idea of personality, but there are still no guarantees that what you see in the shelter is what you'll have at home. A shelter where I volunteered had a cat for over 2 years that no one could get near. She'd hiss, scratch, try to bite anyone who came within 2 feet of her. She was eventually adopted by an older gentleman where she was the only pet in the house and she turned into the sweetest snuggle cat you'd ever want to meet.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganesha0 View Post


@1CatOverTheLine

This might sound silly, nevertheless, I confess that there's a certain "something" about the American Short Hair that tells me, very loudly, take me home! smile.gif

 

 

I can't for the life of me understand whence that thought might have come.  Perhaps in a dream.

 

/

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
@GoldyCat

You're right about the risk of bringing a kitten home. That's why I would prefer a retired breeder or an adult shelter cat. People who took care of both would have a better idea of their personality. Not 100% guaranteed, but more likely.

@1CatOverTheLine

Could it be that it is seems like an agreeable fellow? smile.gif
post #10 of 13
From how you're describing your Rotty's demeanor & temperament , I'd say a Persian sounds like the perfect breed for you. I know that's not on your list, but I feel I'd be doing you an injustice by not recommending this breed. They mainly attach to one person but are usually quite comfortable with everyone in the household. They love their alone time but whenever you are home they usually stay nearby. They are very dignified with quite unique personalities (like most cats 😉) . Very laid back and reserved. They are not very active at all and love sitting with you for a good book or some tv time, it's actually their favorite past time! Hardy, most definitely, but some can be probed to more health problems than an American Short hair, for example. I have yet to encounter any breed specific health issues with mine, but it's definitely something to research and take into consideration during your hunt for the perfect companion. Good luck in re-entering the wonderful world of pet ownership 🤗😍!


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post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Persians are very sweet. I once went to a shoe store where the owner had 2 of them. The female was very happy sleeping and did not want to be disturbed. The male was a different story: tummy rubs and grooming me smile.gif I will adopt one when I become a retired senior and I'm home a lot.
post #12 of 13
Here's a general summary of these breeds and how their temperament compares with each other:

American Shorthair will be slightly more active than British Shorthair. Maine Coons will have some health issues that should be avoided if responsibly bred. Russian Blues are the most active breed on your list, but they can sometimes be shy. I have a friend who has a Russian Blue and he hangs around the kitchen while people are cooking or baking to see if he can obtain any scraps, and then slinks off to a corner. Norwegian Forest Cats have similar behavior to Maine Coons. They're gentle giants. Persians have many health issues, and can have trouble breathing with that flat face of theirs. They are far less active than the cats you listed.

What I'd reccommend is this: first check out your local shelter to see if there's a cat there that steals your heart. Most cats in shelters are Domestic Shorthair or Domestic Longhairs (i.e. A mix), like my Charlie. If, at your shelter, you feel that your new best friend isn't at your shelter, you can check out local cat shows and talk to owners of the breeds you're interested in to learn more. If you're going to get a purebred cat, make sure you find a reputable breeder, and the place to meet them is at cat shows.
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abyeb View Post

Here's a general summary of these breeds and how their temperament compares with each other:

American Shorthair will be slightly more active than British Shorthair. Maine Coons will have some health issues that should be avoided if responsibly bred. Russian Blues are the most active breed on your list, but they can sometimes be shy. I have a friend who has a Russian Blue and he hangs around the kitchen while people are cooking or baking to see if he can obtain any scraps, and then slinks off to a corner. Norwegian Forest Cats have similar behavior to Maine Coons. They're gentle giants. Persians have many health issues, and can have trouble breathing with that flat face of theirs. They are far less active than the cats you listed.

What I'd reccommend is this: first check out your local shelter to see if there's a cat there that steals your heart. Most cats in shelters are Domestic Shorthair or Domestic Longhairs (i.e. A mix), like my Charlie. If, at your shelter, you feel that your new best friend isn't at your shelter, you can check out local cat shows and talk to owners of the breeds you're interested in to learn more. If you're going to get a purebred cat, make sure you find a reputable breeder, and the place to meet them is at cat shows.

Thank you. I will volunteer at a local shelter and most likely will find my best friend there smile.gif
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