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Sheba vs Taste of the Wild - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Thread Starter 

I have also read that USDA inspected facilities that make cat foods that contain by-products don't have diseased animals in them or hair or stuff like that. You can call the help line of the cat food company and ask if their facilities are USDA inspected.

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by missmimz View Post
 

This might help give you some more info on how pet food regulation works in terms of by-products, because as this convo started, rendered meats are not just in meals, they can be in just by-products, too. The problem really is that we don't know what "by products" really means in terms of what's in it. Of course they're not just organs or other parts of animals. If that was the case they'd simply list the parts, and we'd all be happy with that because that's a great thing for cats. 

 

"Until the day arrives that pet food consumers sue the FDA forcing them to enforce law (and we will!), be aware that any pet food – regardless of price – containing one of the following ingredients could contain diseased animal material, non-slaughtered dead animal material, euthanized animal material, and/or decomposing animal material (all of these pet food ingredients DO NOT have the requirement to being sourced from a slaughtered animal)…

 

Chicken by products, Chicken by-product meal, Turkey by-products, Turkey by-product meal, Meat Meal, Beef Meal, Lamb Meal, Venison Meal, Meat and Bone Meal, Animal Fat and Animal Digest."

 

http://truthaboutpetfood.com/fda-admits-some-pet-food-sourced-from-diseased-animals/

 

The statement issued by the FDA is as  follows:

“Processed pet food, including pet food consisting of material from diseased animals or animals which have died otherwise than by slaughter, goes through a kill step, such as heat processing, which is designed to kill harmful bacteria.”

 

This sounds like rendering.  If a meat or meat by-product is rendered, it must be listed as such on the ingredients label.

 

https://www.thespruce.com/aafco-definition-meat-by-products-554424

Definition: Meat By-Products are parts of slaughtered animals, not including meat (please note: no muscle meat included). Included are lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, liver, blood, bone, partially defatted low-temperature fatty tissue, and stomach and intestines freed of their contents.

What AAFCO doesn't mention is that meat byproducts may also legally contain: "4D animals (dead, dying, diseased, down), road kill, euthanized cats and dogs, including their collars. These source products are rendered, the fat is siphoned off to be used as "animal fat," and the remaining material is extruded to form "meat by-product meal.

 

http://www.aafco.org/Consumers/What-is-in-Pet-Food

 Meat by-products is the non-rendered, clean parts, other than meat, derived from slaughtered mammals. It includes, but is not limited to, lungs, spleen, kidneys, brain, livers, blood, bone, partially de-fatted low temperature fatty tissue, and stomachs and intestines freed of their contents. It does not include hair, horns, teeth and hoofs. It shall be suitable for use in animal feed. If it bears a name descriptive of its kind, it must correspond thereto.”

To put it another way, it is most of the parts of the animal other than the muscle tissue, including the internal organs and bones. It includes some of the parts people eat (such as livers, kidneys and tripe), but also parts that are not typically consumed by humans in the US. Some by-products, like udders and lungs are not deemed "edible" by USDA for human consumption, but they can be perfectly safe and nutritious for animals not inclined to be swayed by the unappealing nature of these parts of animals. As with "meat," unless the by-products are derived from cattle, pigs, sheep or goats, the species must be identified.
 
...
 
“Poultry By-Products must consist of non-rendered clean parts of carcasses of slaughtered poultry such as heads, feet, viscera, free from fecal content and foreign matter except in such trace amounts as might occur unavoidably in good factory practice. If the product bears a name descriptive of its kind, it must correspond thereto.”

Similar to "meat by-products," it is most of the parts of the bird that would not be part of a raw, dressed whole carcass. That may include the giblets (heart, gizzard and liver) but also other internal organs, heads and feet.
 
...
 
The following materials are all rendered products that have been subject to cooking to destroy any harmful bacteria before they are shipped to a pet food manufacturing plant. Rendering is a process where the materials are subject to heat and pressure, removing most of the water and fat and leaving primarily protein and minerals. You will notice that the term “meal” is used in all cases; because, in addition to cooking, the products are ground to form uniform sized particles.

“Meat Meal is the rendered product from mammal tissues, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices. It shall not contain extraneous materials not provided for by this definition. …. {the definition goes on to include the required mineral specifications and required nutrient guarantees}….. If the product bears a name descriptive of its kind, composition or origin it must correspond thereto.”

The rendering process is designed to destroy disease-causing bacteria, leaving an ingredient high in protein that while unappetizing to people appeals to the carnivore's palate. Unlike "meat" and "meat by-products," this ingredient may be from mammals other than cattle, pigs, sheep or goats without further description. However, a manufacturer may designate a species if appropriate (such as "beef meal" if only from cattle).

“Meat and Bone Meal is the rendered product from mammal tissues, including bone, exclusive of any added blood, hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices. It shall not contain extraneous materials not provided for by this definition. …. {the definition goes on to include the required mineral specifications and required nutrient guarantees}….. If the product bears a name descriptive of its kind, composition or origin it must correspond thereto.”

Similar to "meat meal," but can include added bone in addition to what is normally found in whole carcasses.

“Animal By-Product Meal is the rendered product from mammal tissues, exclusive of any added hair, hoof, horn, hide trimmings, manure, stomach and rumen contents except in such amounts as may occur unavoidably in good processing practices. It shall not contain extraneous materials not provided for by this definition. This ingredient definition is intended to cover those individual rendered animal tissues that cannot meet the criteria as set forth elsewhere in this section. This ingredient is not intended to be used to label a mixture of animal tissue products.”

May consist of whole carcasses, but often includes by-products in excess of what would normally be found in "meat meal" and "meat and bone meal."

“Poultry By-Product Meal consists of the ground, rendered clean parts of the carcasses of slaughtered poultry such as necks, feet, undeveloped eggs and intestines, exclusive of feathers except in such amounts as might occur unavoidably in good processing practices.….{the definition goes on to include the required mineral specifications and required nutrient guarantees}….. If the product bears a name descriptive of its kind, it must correspond thereto.”

Essentially the same as "poultry by-products," but in rendered form so most of the water and fat has been removed to make a concentrated protein/mineral ingredient.

“Poultry Meal is the dry rendered product from a combination of clean flesh and skin with or without accompanying bone, derived from the parts or whole carcasses of poultry or a combination thereof, exclusive of feathers, heads, feet and entrails. It shall be suitable for use in animal food. If it bears a name descriptive of its kind, it must correspond thereto.”

Basically the same as "poultry," but in rendered form, so most of the water and fat has been removed to make a concentrated protein/mineral ingredient.
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashekitty View Post
 

I would still say though if it's between plant based protein and by-products, I would go with the by-products. That's what I have taken away from my research anyway. 

Yes, I totally agree with you on this!  Cats don't need veggies, they need meat! :nod:

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by dorimon View Post
 

 

The statement issued by the FDA is as  follows:

 

This sounds like rendering.  If a meat or meat by-product is rendered, it must be listed as such on the ingredients label.

 

https://www.thespruce.com/aafco-definition-meat-by-products-554424

 

http://www.aafco.org/Consumers/What-is-in-Pet-Food

I know what the AAFCO guidelines say, but the problem is enforcement. The FDA says euthanized animals aren't allowed in pet food, but tests are showing otherwise. As Susan at TAPF notes there are major issues within both the AAFCO and FDA in terms of enforcing and following guidelines, in addition there are major loopholes, which is why she says to be wearing of any by-products, and she suggests that even just by-products (not just meals) may contain both contaminates and rendered or euthanized animals based on testing of these foods. Ultimately, the goal should be to feed your cat the highest quality meat you can afford, and if you use lower end foods with by-products try and rotate with some higher end foods. 

 

I also want to point out that I'm citing Susan because she has done extensive research and interaction with both AAFCO and FDA in terms of what exactly is in pet foods and lobbying for more transparency around what goes into our pets foods. I don't necessarily agree with her opinions on other things, but in terms of the issues around both AAFCO and the FDA, she knows what she's talking about. 

post #35 of 40
Thread Starter 
@missmimz
Can you recommend me some higher quality canned foods to mix in with Sheba once in a while? Thanks.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by missmimz View Post
 

I know what the AAFCO guidelines say, but the problem is enforcement. The FDA says euthanized animals aren't allowed in pet food, but tests are showing otherwise. As Susan at TAPF notes there are major issues within both the AAFCO and FDA in terms of enforcing and following guidelines, in addition there are major loopholes, which is why she says to be wearing of any by-products, and she suggests that even just by-products (not just meals) may contain both contaminates and rendered or euthanized animals based on testing of these foods. Ultimately, the goal should be to feed your cat the highest quality meat you can afford, and if you use lower end foods with by-products try and rotate with some higher end foods. 

 

I also want to point out that I'm citing Susan because she has done extensive research and interaction with both AAFCO and FDA in terms of what exactly is in pet foods and lobbying for more transparency around what goes into our pets foods. I don't necessarily agree with her opinions on other things, but in terms of the issues around both AAFCO and the FDA, she knows what she's talking about. 

Ah, I see your point.  I agree that the FDA doesn't do a good job enforcing the regulations... and AAFCO members who write the regulations have their own interests that often conflict with those of consumers.  I also agree that we need more transparency into the pet food industry, and that Susan does a lot of great work there and is extremely knowledgeable.

 

Ultimately, though, the issue is not limited to the "lower end" foods and by-products.  Rendered ingredients could be present in any food, but we have to do the best we can with the information that we have.

 

And if a person can't afford the expensive foods, there is nothing wrong with just feeding the more affordable brands.  We all just want do the best that we can for our beloved kitties :nod: 

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashekitty View Post

Can you recommend me some higher quality canned foods to mix in with Sheba once in a while? Thanks.

I personally wouldn't feed some of these foods and there are also several foods I'm okay with that didn't make the list, but this list is a good place to start: http://www.naturalcatcareblog.com/2010/12/the-7-best-natural-commercial-cat-foods-so-far/

 

Many people here have their own lists of acceptable foods that are based on their own kitties' preferences/needs, budget, must-avoid ingredients, etc.

post #38 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dorimon View Post

I personally wouldn't feed some of these foods and there are also several foods I'm okay with that didn't make the list, but this list is a good place to start: http://www.naturalcatcareblog.com/2010/12/the-7-best-natural-commercial-cat-foods-so-far/

Many people here have their own lists of acceptable foods that are based on their own kitties' preferences/needs, budget, must-avoid ingredients, etc.

Thank you!! I will look into this.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashekitty View Post

Thank you!! I will look into this.

Happy to help.  It's great that you are researching different options for your kitty!

 

I also just want to mention that Dr. Pierson (CatInfo.org) says to "try not to drive yourself nuts when picking out a canned cat food.  The fact that you are feeding canned food and not dry food is 90% of the battle so just do the best that you can ..."

 

She also details how you might go about comparing different commercial foods: http://catinfo.org/commercial-cat-foods/

 

I personally feed both Sheba and Fancy Feast Classic, along with some more expensive brands.

post #40 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dorimon View Post

Happy to help.  It's great that you are researching different options for your kitty!

I also just want to mention that Dr. Pierson (CatInfo.org) says to "try not to drive yourself nuts when picking out a canned cat food.  The fact that you are feeding canned food and not dry food is 90% of the battle so just do the best that you can ..."

She also details how you might go about comparing different commercial foods: http://catinfo.org/commercial-cat-foods/

I personally feed both Sheba and Fancy Feast Classic, along with some more expensive brands.

Thank you! I have read catinfo.org, it's brilliant.
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