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Vaccinations

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I need help and advice please.
Theres a couple of people i know here in the UK who are unsure as regards to vaccinating there cats for flu and leukemia.
Someone i know said their fur baby had a really bad reaction to to the injections.
When i took Rosie for her boosters last year all she wanted to do once i brought her home was to go to her room. She would'nt eat in fact she slept most of the day!.
By 8.p.m that night i was worried so i rang the emergency number, but they told me that this was normal for her to feel a bit down for the first 24 hours?!.
Now i've just spoke to a vet nurse i know, and she said she sees many cats have reactions such as this, but said it isn't normal otherwise all cats would be like this!.
She said these injections have pros and cons and at the end of the day it's personal choice wether to vaccinate.

My vet knows Rosie is a house cat but still advices for her to have the flu jab. But now i'm unsure?!.
I'm the sort of person who gets of the fence and isn't afraid to speak, so if anyone can help me with questions to give him regarding vaccinations i would appreciate it, because i am uncertain and Rosies health is priority!!.

Thanks
Susan
post #2 of 26
A flu vaccine for cats? I don't remember my boys ever getting a flu shot. Maybe its something only done in the UK?
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
They get 2 vaccines a year in the UK.
One for cat flu and enteritis and another for leukemia.

Cat flu can be life threatening and is easily passed on to other cats if not vaccinated for it. You normally see it in ferel cats, where their little eyes are watery and sticky?!.
post #4 of 26
My kits are indoors only to an I debated the shots , I am so glad I did get the shots I learned that if they were to get the virus ( there are 6, 2 are major ) they could be carriers and shed the virus for the rest of their lives.

I would rather do the prevention route heres a good link


http://www.animalclinic.com/FEURTI.htm
post #5 of 26
PS some call it the cat flu some call it a cold some call it a URI
post #6 of 26
When Dori got her first leukemia shot at about 5 or 6 months she got really sick. I brought her home from the vet and put her on the floor she had diarhea right away, some blood in it also. I called the vet, they told me to keep a close eye on her. She had diarhea, and no desire to do anything for 2 days then she was ok.

She got a total of 4 sets of kitten shots. The first leukemia was in the 2nd set of shots (that's when she got sick) she got a second leukemia shot during the third set of shots, I didn't want her to get it, but after a long discussion with my vet we decided to break up the 3 shots she was getting. I went each Saturday morning for 3 weeks for 1 shot. She didn't get sick. Since she is my 1st cat I am not real educated on the shot process, and honestly am not sure if she got a shot to prevent colds or flu... I am going to check into it though.

I do have a question relating to this also. Dori is strictly an indoor cat. I know that she needs her shots just like any other cat but is is still necessary to get them yearly? I know rabies is required yearly or we have to pay a fine, but what others does she need every year?
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Oh god, i just don't know what to do for the best?.

If i could be 100% certain that Rosie's life was'nt at risk or more to the point that she could die with having the injections i would be ok!. But it's a case of if she does'nt have them she's at risk and if she does?.

She's never had an upset tummy or any sickness. God i'd be a basketcase!.

SQUIRTLE: Rosie was fine when she first got them all as a kitten, it was only when she had her boosters last year that she was under the weather. But this is why i need to know also because i was told that they do have to have them every year. Have a look at the posting Dana put on for me.
post #8 of 26
If you have concerns about the vaccinations, be sure to discuss them with your vet. He or she should be able to discuss the risk vs. benefit with you, and help you come to a decision that's best for your cat.

One of my cats had a severe life-threatening reaction to his vaccines (anaphylactic shock) a couple of years ago. Even though he's an indoor cat, he's still at risk of exposure to diseases because we have an indoor/outdoor cat and occasionally pick up fosters, so we still vaccinate him. When he gets his shots, the vet premedicates him and gives only one vaccine per visit, and I leave him at the vet for observation. He returns in 2 weeks for the other vaccine, and gets the same precautions for that. We've stopped vaccinating for leukemia b/c he's at low risk since he's been vaccinated for it all his life (he's 10), but we still vaccinate for rabies, and the fvrcpc combo.

*If your cat is completely indoors and you never pick up fosters, you might not need to vaccinate for feline leukemia or feline aids (fiv). But rabies is usually required by law, and the distemper combo (which I'm guessing is the flu shot you're mentioning) is highly recommended because it's very contagious.

Your vet can take precautions in vaccinating by separating the vaccines (as we do with my boy), or I've heard that you can do immunity testing to check immunity levels to determine when she needs to be revaccinated. Just talk it over with your vet, and make sure your concerns are addressed.

Another note: serious anaphylactic reactions like my boy had are very rare. It's very common for a cat to be feeling bad -sleepy and not very playful- after shots, kind of like after a human gets a flu shot. That's not a serious reaction, but you do want to tell your vet about it. He might also be able to change brands of vaccine - that helps some cats.
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Now thats interested me Tuxedo because when i took her for her boosters last year i asked my vet did she need them with being indoors?.

He said almost certain the flu/enteritis as i could bring the virus in on me if i had touched an animal with it, which i could understand. But the leukemia she would only need to have for her first 5 years, because by then her immune system would built up.

I rang the surgery to question this a few months ago, and the vet nurse said 'i can't understand why he said that', as if i had'nt heard him right, but i know i did because this was the one question i wanted an answer to when i took her in!.

But i will ask questions without a doubt, but if theres any an particular i should ask, feel free.
post #10 of 26
That was it, the distemper combo, now I remember that did have something in it for the "the flu". Dori did not get sick from that one, she was her usual self when we got home. It was the feline leukemia shot that made her sick. From now on though my vet does want to take the precautions Tux mentioned. She only will get one shot per visit, and with the leukemia she will stay with the vet for the day for observation. I am still debating the leukemia shot because she is an indoor cat. We aren't getting another animal so she isn't exposed to it that way, but my fear it this: I rent an apartment right now. It will be a while before I have my own house and I may possibly move to another apartment before then. What if the people who lived in the apartment before me had several cats, or even one with the leukemia virus. Couldn't the virus still be lurking about once I moved in? I got this idea because I thought I heard that if someone has 1 cat who gets leukemia, that once that cat is gone and if they get a new cat the new cat could get the virus from being in the same house. (I don't know if that is true) I HATE to think that Dori's leukemia shot could make her sick, but leukemia would be worse. It is all so confusing!
post #11 of 26
The only time my lot have vaccinations is when I go on holiday and they need it for the cattery.
They only have the flu/enteritis(I call it feli-flu) and I do not give them the lukemia one.
My first cat Harry Flashman was put to sleep due to lukemia at the age of 7. They say it is a danger in multi cat households but Tulip was a little kitten then and did not catch it. I had 3 others who also did not get lukemia (they died of other things)
So maybe he didnt actually have it? I dont know. You can have the test for lukemia and if clear then have the injection against it! Thats a lot of money so my vet advises just go for the shot - immunity if they havnt got it and no harm done if they have!
Mine are indoor/outdoor but dont see a real need for rabies(? can we actually get that shot )or distemper. Have a think about the feline aids one though - ask about that.
I have never really had a 'sickly' cat and they all seem to have built up immunity over the years. Perhaps they are just rough and tough.
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
The more i'm reading about the leukemia shot the more i'm siding away from giving her it!!.

But i'm making notes of all the questions everyone is posting so i'm prepared for when i go in june.

Nothing is too good for my baby!!

Thanks everyone.
post #13 of 26
feline leukemia info

How is FeLV spread from cat to cat? The feline leukemia virus is excreted in saliva and tears and possibly the urine and feces of infected cats. Prolonged, extensive cat-to-cat contact is required for efficient spread, because the virus is rapidly inactivated by warmth and drying.


So aparrently it's not spread all that easily, but I'd sure rather be safe than sorry. To me the use of the term 'efficient' - doesn't mean cat-to-cat contact is required entirely for spread, just for 'efficient' spread.

Tulip, whether or not to vaccinate for rabies depends on where you live. In Texas it's the law - our state was actually under rabies quarantine for a few years, and rabid wildlife was showing up regularly. Rabid skunks, raccoons, opossums, and coyotes are still occasionally found. Your vet should be able to tell you whether or not it's required. I wouldn't care to take that risk. We vaccinate our indoor/outdoor cat for FIV, too, but not the indoor cats. Unfortunately there's a lot of FIV in our area.
post #14 of 26
I hate deciding about vaccinations. Zoey is going tomorrow for her annual. She has to get the rabies shot because my landlord requires it Plus apparently, if she were to ever bite someone, animal control could take her away if I cant prove she's had her rabies shot.

The FVRCP (distemper, whatever) is good for 3 years so I dont have to do that one tomorrow.

And my vet never vaccinates indoor cats for FELV. I'm very glad about that.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by rosiemac
The more i'm reading about the leukemia shot the more i'm siding away from giving her it!!.

But i'm making notes of all the questions everyone is posting so i'm prepared for when i go in june.

Nothing is too good for my baby!!

Thanks everyone.
Sweden and the UK are very similar when it comes to cats and diseases. The only necessary shots are for panleukopenia and cat flu (which I highly recommend even if vaccinated cats still can get cat flu they don't get as sick as if completely unprotected). FeLV isn't necessary at all if your cat is a strictly indoors cat. Some cat breeders in Sweden vaccinate their cats against FeLV but most of us test our cats instead of using the vaccine. Vaccine against FIP is a waste unless you have another cat with the disease in the same household and rabies is only necessary if you plan to take your cat for a vacation to a "rabies country". Both Sweden and Great Britain are "rabies free" countries.
post #16 of 26
Susan -

Tuxedokitties is right. This is from Catnip magazine, Feb. 2004:

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR EVERY CAT
RABIES

After the first vac, a booster should be given yearly or every 3 years, depending on local laws and products favored by your veterinarian.

Purpose of vac: It prevents rabies, which routinely is fatal for infected cats and is considered an increasing threat.

FELINE DISTEMPER (also called feline panleukopenia, feline parvovirus or FPV)

Frequency: After the first vac, a booster should be given one year later, then no more frequently than every three years. This conflicts with manufacturer's recommendations of annual booster vaccination, so the every-three-year recommendation is controversial.

Purpose of vac: It prevents a highly-contagious viral disease, which until fairly recently killed thousands of cats each year and was considered the most serious infectious disease among cats. The virus is so hardy that it can survive extremes of temperature and humidity for months, and it is resistant to most available disinfectants, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

FELINE HERPESVIRUS-1 AND FELINE CALICIVIRUS (FHV-1 AND FCV)

Frequency: After the first vac, a booster should be given one year later, then once every 3 years. However, vacs that are currently available are approved only for annual use, so the every-three-year recommendation is controversial. Also, vaccinating yearly may be recommended in selected high-risk situations.

Purpose of vac: To prevent viruses that are responsible for 80 to 90 percent of infectious feline upper-respiratory tract diesases. Most cats are exposed to either or both viruses at some point. Once infected, many cats never completely get rid of the virus; according to the AVMA, they continue to infect other cats as they continuously or intermittently shed the organiams for a long time - and perhaps for life.

RECOMMENDED FOR CERTAIN CATS:

FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS (FeLV)

Frequency: Cats at risk of exposure-especially kittens younger than four months old and free-roaming cats-are recommended for the annual vac. In addition, annual vacs are also recommended for indoor/outdoor cats, and cats living where new cats frequently are introduced. Buy yearly vacs are NOT recommended for cats with little or no risk of exposure; that's especially true of low-risk cats above four months old.

Purpose: It prevents what has been called the leading viral killer of cats, according to the AVMA. The virus spreads from cat to cat through casual contact or bite wounds; it also spreads from an infected mother cat to her kittens

My strictly indoor cat got vaccinated last month for rabies, (required by law and good for 3 years) and the other 3 in a 3-in-one shot (my vet said she has to get this one next year). I'll discuss it with her then, I'm not so sure she'll need it. There is a controversy among vets - should cats be vaccinated every year or every 3 years?

I personally will not have my indoor cat vaccinated against FeLV.

"There is worry re the yearly vacs because of the adverse effect vacs can have, namely vaccine-related sarcoma. They are highly malignant tumors that occur on the cat's body at the vac site and are most often associated with feline leukemia vaccines and certain rabies vaccines. To reduce the risk, current recommendations call for avoiding unneccessary vacs, and taking other precautions such as avoiding repetitive vacs at the same spot on the cat".

Also, if you move, you can disinfect the new apartment before you move in, I just don't remember the best cleaner(s) to use. Bleach?? I don't know if steam-cleaning a rug is enough, maybe there's a product you can add to the machine.

Jill and Candy
post #17 of 26
For Rabies, make sure your vet uses PureVax. It is a semi new vaccination that does not contain (something?) that causes risk of tumors (sarcomas). I will look for the info and post it.. I just remember another board member mentioning it, and I asked my vet and they do use it luckily.
post #18 of 26
Sicycat-

I think you're talking about adjuvant. From the same article I quoted from earlier it says "Currently, there is only one non-adjuvant rabies vaccine, and it is approved only as a yearly vaccine."

But, maybe some good news: "In an encouraging new development, an article appearing in the Nov. 1, 2003, issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association examined the risk factors for the development of vaccine-associated sarcomas in cats and found no increased risk associated with vaccines containing adjuvant. The only factor that did seem to increase risk slightly was administering a vaccine that is cold - that is, directly out of the refrigerator."

I sure hope that's true, my cat got the 3 year vaccine.

Jill and Candy
post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone for all your replies, i've really gained knowledge on the vaccinations.

I will go through it with my vet when i take Rosie in june, but with hearing stories from yourselves and people here in the UK, the leukemia shot is one she won't be having, especially with her being indoors.

A vet nurse i know has even said that if it was'nt for the fact that her cats go outdoors, she would'nt give them the leukemia shot, and to also be prepared for the vet to try and brainwash me into giving Rosie the leukemia shot and to stand my ground, but fortunatly i'm not easily taken in.

She even mentioned to get Rosie Titre tested to check her immune system to the virus?!, which is a thought.

I know i'm probably worrying too much, but if anything happened to Rosie, god i don't want to even think about it!.

post #20 of 26
I had a long discussion with my vet about vaccinations and frequency. Last year, we talked about the issue of sarcoma at the site. She has gone to a few seminars about this issue, and says that there is no concensus, and its very confused. They really do not know if vaccinations cause sarcoma, and there is evidence that some cats are just pre-disposed to sarcoma, and even anasthetic needles can "cause" it. So there is no verifiable direct link between vaccination and sarcoma. She did say that the injections that were related to sarcoma in cats that developed it were sub-q injetions, she prefers intra-muscular injections.

As for rabies, it is required by law, and also highly recommended, to protect humans. The risk of rabies in our area is fairly low, as they have eradicated it from the local skunk and raccoon population. However, there appear to be rabid bats, and there were two human deaths from rabies in the past year. So the consequence of getting rabies from your cat, who contact it from a bat or mouse, is catastrophic. Basically, you vaccinate your cat to reduce the life threatening risk to yourself.

As for distemper, this is not as serious for humans, but much more easy for the cat to contract. Because its airborn, even an indoor cat can contract it.

So, after thinking that we were going to be on an every three year schedule, we changed our minds, and have switched back to annual boosters.

And Sam is sick for the first day, but all he does is sleep it off. I get sick for a day after vaccinations too. Its not life threatening (like anaphylactic shock).
post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by iluvcandy
Sicycat-

I think you're talking about adjuvant. From the same article I quoted from earlier it says "Currently, there is only one non-adjuvant rabies vaccine, and it is approved only as a yearly vaccine."

But, maybe some good news: "In an encouraging new development, an article appearing in the Nov. 1, 2003, issue of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association examined the risk factors for the development of vaccine-associated sarcomas in cats and found no increased risk associated with vaccines containing adjuvant. The only factor that did seem to increase risk slightly was administering a vaccine that is cold - that is, directly out of the refrigerator."

I sure hope that's true, my cat got the 3 year vaccine.

Jill and Candy
Thank you.. that's what I was thinking about .. adjuvant. And that's an interesting tip about the vaccine being cold.

Its really hard because, different people tell you different things.. and you read so many different things it just get so confusing and frustraing when its time to make a decision. All I know is when I asked my vet about getting a 3 year instead (I thought it would be nice to not have to go every year) she told me they switched to the 1 year purevax because of less risk of sarcomas. So I dont know what to believe yknow.

I bet they dont really know anything.
post #22 of 26
I have a question for you guys,

Kinsey's supposed to have her rabies shot this week but I was wondering if I could wait until august when Mosely's due so they can just go together? Anyone know if this is okay?
post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by LDM
I have a question for you guys,

Kinsey's supposed to have her rabies shot this week but I was wondering if I could wait until august when Mosely's due so they can just go together? Anyone know if this is okay?
I'd say it depends on where you live, and if your cat is indoors-only. If you live somewhere rabies vaccination and possibly licensing is required by law, or somewhere that rabies has been a problem, don't wait. If you live somewhere it's not required by law & your cat is indoors-only, it's probably OK to wait. If you're unsure, call your vet's office & ask - they should be able to tell you what's appropriate for your area.
post #24 of 26
Just a suggestion, here. Because there are differences in law and in disease risk in different countries, it would be easier to follow people's points of view if everyone would go back to their profile and add at least their country in the location field, if that is not currently given.
post #25 of 26
Oh, good point about location. I don't want to change my profile, but I am in Southern Ontario.

My cats were on slightly different "schedules", Bailey due in February, Sam due in April for shots. I asked the vet about delaying Bailey's for a couple of months so I could take them in together, and she said, no problem, the vaccine was good for much longer than one year, so there was no risk in delaying.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Sammie5
I had a long discussion with my vet about vaccinations and frequency. Last year, we talked about the issue of sarcoma at the site. She has gone to a few seminars about this issue, and says that there is no concensus, and its very confused. They really do not know if vaccinations cause sarcoma, and there is evidence that some cats are just pre-disposed to sarcoma, and even anasthetic needles can "cause" it. So there is no verifiable direct link between vaccination and sarcoma. She did say that the injections that were related to sarcoma in cats that developed it were sub-q injetions, she prefers intra-muscular injections.

As for rabies, it is required by law, and also highly recommended, to protect humans. The risk of rabies in our area is fairly low, as they have eradicated it from the local skunk and raccoon population. However, there appear to be rabid bats, and there were two human deaths from rabies in the past year. So the consequence of getting rabies from your cat, who contact it from a bat or mouse, is catastrophic. Basically, you vaccinate your cat to reduce the life threatening risk to yourself.

As for distemper, this is not as serious for humans, but much more easy for the cat to contract. Because its airborn, even an indoor cat can contract it.

So, after thinking that we were going to be on an every three year schedule, we changed our minds, and have switched back to annual boosters.

And Sam is sick for the first day, but all he does is sleep it off. I get sick for a day after vaccinations too. Its not life threatening (like anaphylactic shock).
Weill, since the cat in question lives in the UK, rabies isn't at all necessary. Like I said earlier, the UK is a "rabies-free" country meaning no vaccinations are necessary. I know because I live in a rabies free country and have been checking up facts about importing breeding cats.
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