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Grammar Quiz

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
http://thepioneerwoman.com/fun-and-learning/smartypants-quiz-grammar-edition-enter-now/

Just finished this grammar quiz hoping to win a prize & am miffed that I scored only 90%. I am at a complete loss as to what I got wrong.

Anyone else want to have a go?
post #2 of 32

Sure, I'll have a go at it .

DANG!  I missed one, got 95%

Not even sure which one I missed. 

Maybe they will post the answers on Saturday.


Edited by Red Top Rescue - 12/30/16 at 12:22pm
post #3 of 32
Well poo. I only got 85%. I like to think I'm good at grammar. We probably got the same ones wrong wink.gif. Plus I got one extra wrong, lol. I think I got the creek question wrong. I think I'll see if I can retake it. . .

OK I retook it and got 100%. I got the coats question, the group of students question, and the creek question wrong the first time. Maybe those are the tricky ones to look at again.
Edited by Willowy - 12/30/16 at 12:36pm
post #4 of 32
Thread Starter 
What did you put for coats, creek & students group? I don't want to wait for tomorrow to find out what I did wrong. The first one threw me off: I had never heard of a "helping verb".
post #5 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Top Rescue View Post

Sure, I'll have a go at it .
DANG!  I missed one, got 95%
Not even sure which one I missed. 
Maybe they will post the answers on Saturday.

They will, but I want to know now what I got wrong. As a Brit, I pride myself on knowing English grammar. smile.gif
post #6 of 32
I had to google "helping verb"; I'd never heard of it either. For my answers, I made them a spoiler so other people can still give it a try biggrin.gif.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
For the coats question, the first time I put childrens' but apparently the right answer is children's, I gather this is because children is already plural wink.gif. For the group of students, the first time I put is---I could have sworn that I learned that a group. . .is, not a group. . .are. But I guess "are" is correct. For the creek question, the subject is "you" because it is a directive---YOU are not to go down to the creek during a flood. The first time I put "creek".
post #7 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post

I had to google "helping verb"; I'd never heard of it either. For my answers, I made them a spoiler so other people can still give it a try biggrin.gif.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
For the coats question, the first time I put childrens' but apparently the right answer is children's, I gather this is because children is already plural wink.gif. For the group of students, the first time I put is---I could have sworn that I learned that a group. . .is, not a group. . .are. But I guess "are" is correct. For the creek question, the subject is "you" because it is a directive---YOU are not to go down to the creek during a flood. The first time I put "creek".
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
The creek one tripped me up. Of course YOU is the subject. Duh to me.

Yes, children is what is called a plural noun.

No way does group of students get are instead of is. That is totally wrong. Wrong. Wrong. You would never say a flock of birds are flying. Flock is a collective noun as is group.

Dumb quiz!
post #8 of 32

Yay, 100%! Not bad for a Gentile, so to speak.

post #9 of 32

I got a 90% and am not sure where I went wrong, either.   headscratch.gif   My grammar skills have apparently eroded over the many years since I've taken English.  sniffle.gif

post #10 of 32
Thread Starter 
Did you put a group "is" because, apparently, the quiz is saying it should be "are", which is wrong. Will have to check tomorrow when answers are revealed.
post #11 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Primula View Post

Did you put a group "is" because, apparently, the quiz is saying it should be "are", which is wrong. Will have to check tomorrow when answers are revealed.

 

Yes, I did. Well, maybe we got 95%!  

post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Primula View Post

What did you put for coats, creek & students group? I don't want to wait for tomorrow to find out what I did wrong. The first one threw me off: I had never heard of a "helping verb".

I had 95%. I used "You" for the creek question. I think it's an implied subject. "(You) don't go near the creek....."

 

The group is...... Because "group" is the actual subject and is singular, with "of students" being a prepositional phrase? But what do I know? Obviously English is not my forte. (Just read Willowy's spoiler tag. I don't agree (not with Willowy, but with the reasoning behind the "group of students" question.) So that's the one I messed up on.

post #13 of 32
100%. I'm an English teacher, so it was pretty easy for me. "Group" is a collective noun, and those are always singular--I put "is" so if you did the same and still got 95% it's something else that's off. Verbs in the imperative tense (don't go to the creek...) have "you" as their subject. If anyone has any other questions, I can probably answer them wink.gif.
post #14 of 32
I bet they changed it. . .tongue.gif.
post #15 of 32

OK, the GROUP was the only one I got "wrong" and after looking up the rules, it is quite clear that BOTH are acceptable.  Here's an interesting discussion:

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/a-group-of-students-go-goes.495998/

post #16 of 32

No, a group is;  it's a collective noun. What is throwing you off is that a plural ("of students") precedes the verb.

 

I got 95%, and I'm an English major, too. I think the one I got wrong was "a lot" or "alot." I think the correct grammar was the former, but am not sure. It could have been bad and badly, too, because badly is an adverb, saying how you felt, but since we are talking about feelings here, and not about touching something, I went with bad following a state of being verb.

 

This "helping verb" business is mixing up a lot of people, making it more complicated than it really is. Are is a state of being verb and is followed by an adjective. Calling it a helping verb muddies the waters, but that's what people are teaching now. They are doing the same thing with present perfect and past perfect tenses, calling have and had helping verbs.

post #17 of 32
"Alot" is never correct. That is not a word biggrin.gif.

Yeah, the answer was "felt bad". I once learned something about when to say "badly" although I don't remember the details. But you never feel badly, unless you have a diminished sense of touch wink.gif.
post #18 of 32
Well, at least I didn't fall for "ahold of." That's been a pet peeve for a long time.
post #19 of 32
And "should of", "could of", etc. I realize that should've and could've SOUND like should of/could of but nooooo! That's a major grammer pet peeve of mine, lol.
post #20 of 32

Well, "group" is technically the subject and "of students" is a prepositional phrase.

post #21 of 32

They didn't use my favorite one, conjugating the verbs TO LAY and TO LIE.  Think how many times those are used incorrectly in popular songs!

i.e. "Lay down Sally" (Eric Clapton) and "Lay Lady Lay" -- one could make a song list of the incorrect usage actually..............

"Lady Lets Lay Down and Dance" (Garth Brooks)

Lady Lay Down (John Conley)

Lay Low (Blake Shelton)

Lay There and Hate Me (Ben Harper & Relentless7)

Roll Over Lay Down (Status Quo)

She Lays Down (The 1975)

etc.

 

But there are plenty of songs that use it correctly too:

Lay Down Your Weapons (K. Koke)

Lay Me Down (Sam Smith)

Lay You Down (Usher)

Lay It On Me (Kelly Rowland)

etc.

post #22 of 32
Yes.
People and cats LIE down.
Cats are LYING on a blanket.
Cats LIE in front of the door.
They also LIE together in boxes.
post #23 of 32
*nerd hat on*

Lay is a transitive verb, which means it needs an object. That's why you lay something on a table, or something else lays you down. Lie is intransitive, so doesn't take an object. So when you lie down you're basically the subject and the object. I have always thought that the reason people get confused is that the past tense of lie is lay. So, lie, lay, lain and lay, laid, laid. Raise and rise are another example of a transitive/intransitive pair, but people tend not to confuse them because their past forms are noticeably different.

*doffs nerd hat*
post #24 of 32

Grammar was my least favorite subject in school.  I absolutely hated diagramming sentences.  I loved Literature though.  In high school we had to take some type of English course every year but by my junior year it was all Literature courses and in college I stayed away from speech and writing courses.  I stuck with the Literature courses.  What gets me is that you can find a lot of grammar errors in many of the great author's work.

post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by profdanglais View Post

*nerd hat on*

 

Why? There is nothing nerdy about being precise.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by profdanglais View Post

Lay is a transitive verb, which means it needs an object.

 

As a non-English-speaker I am amazed at usage on this forum. Cats here always lay - they never lie. People err in other languages too, but the prevalence of this particular solecism is mind-boggling.

post #26 of 32

I've had so many dental assistants, nurses, physical therapists, and x-ray technicians tell me to "lay down" that I now correct them. One of them was a lovely young Russian woman, and she looked at me in horror when I told her it was "lie down."  But, but, she stammered, "lie" means not to tell the truth. Yes, I told her, it means that too. "The word has two meanings." She didn't move. I don't think she believed me, so I lay down anyway.

post #27 of 32
Quote:
Why? There is nothing nerdy about being precise.
It's very nerdy. But there's nothing wrong with being nerdy! Embrace it! laughing02.gif

I guess I've never thought twice about the difference between lie and lay anon.gif. But now that I try to think about it (it's hard to think about what you say naturally!), I'm pretty sure i would tell someone to lie down, if i were in a position to do so tongue.gif.

When I was a kid, I had schoolwork called "learning language arts through literature", which basically taught sentence structure, spelling, grammar, etc. by reading books and analyzing excerpts from those books. So I have never diagrammed a sentence in the usual way, but I still learned the important parts.
post #28 of 32

Here's a little trick to remember the difference.

 

  • Hens lay eggs; cats lie down.

 

  • Let sleeping dogs lie.
post #29 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willowy View Post

Yeah, the answer was "felt bad". I once learned something about when to say "badly" although I don't remember the details. But you never feel badly, unless you have a diminished sense of touch wink.gif.

I still don't understand that one. The creek was the other one that I stupidly didn't get.

"I felt badly" - badly is an adverb so what's wrong with that? You would never say she drives bad. You would say she drives badly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReallySleepy View Post

As a non-English-speaker I am amazed at usage on this forum.

Meaning?




I used to work with a very smart woman. For the life of her she could not figure out past and passed. Tried to explain, but she never did get it. Our office manager also had no clue of the difference between a noun & an adjective. All things I learned in grade school.
post #30 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Primula View Post


I still don't understand that one. The creek was the other one that I stupidly didn't get.

"I felt badly" - badly is an adverb so what's wrong with that? You would never say she drives bad. You would say she drives badly.
 

Adverbs describe the action expressed by verbs. So if you say "She drives badly" badly describes the action of her driving. But "feel" is a kind of verb that usually describes not an action but the state of its subject. So effectively, the modifier needs to describe the subject and not the verb, meaning it has to be an adjective. "Bad" describes the state of the person who feels, not the manner in which they feel. Saying someone feels badly means they are not good at feeling, i.e. their feelings don't work properly. Someone with Asperger's might be described as feeling badly since their feelings don't function the same way most people's do, but if you are saying that your emotional state is not good, you have to say you feel bad. Similarly, when a person is malodorous, you would say they smell bad (describing their odour) because to say they smell badly would mean their nose doesn't work. Other verbs of this type include look, sound, feel, taste, etc. 

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