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kitty check ups?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
This is going to sound completely stupid I'm sure but I'm willing to risk it.. My family has had cats since I can remember and they always kept up on vaccinations and stuff, but the only time besides that that they visited the vet was when a kitty was sick. So it's finally time to take roxygo back for vaccinations and I'm wondering if cats can get "check ups". Last time I went in he just shot him and then I left to the tune of like $40. I figure if I'm going to be there anyway and pay the stupid office visit fee he might as well atleast look at the cat. But see the thing is one day I called my mechanic and said I wanted to schedule a "check up" for my car and he was like what are you talking about dumb### so now I feel stupid asking things I'm not sure about. So can you get a check up for your cat and if so what's involved and around what $$?

Also, when someone says they got their cat wormed is that just referring to the drontal or whatever or is there a shot or something that the vet can administer? I hate sounding like a sped but I have been wondering for a while..

tia
post #2 of 19
annabelle,

Typically you start your kitten on shots and keep up with boosters. If you keep your cat in flea treatment (advantage or something along those lines) wormings are not necessary if it is an inside kitty and doesn't have access to wild critters like mice and birds.

A worming treatment is usually a pill depending on what type of worms are infested in your cat.

When a cat reaches 10 years old, it is a good thing to take the cat in and ask for routine blood panel to be drawn so they can check levels and see if the kidney liver etc is functioning. If the cat is normal then it is a good idea to just take it in every year to have the same thing done. If the cat is obese, it is a good idea to have blood panels drawn, for fat cats are susceptible to many health issues unlike their skinny feline friends.

Hope this answers your questions?
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
so the cat really doesn't need to be seen by the doctor unless there's a problem? So just going in for shots is perfectly normal? I just hate paying the $32 visit fee for 30 seconds of time, but hey if that's how it is then I guess it's ok..
post #4 of 19
Every vet probably does it differently. Now that the concept of annual vaccinations causing skin cancers is better known, my vet recommends at least an annual exam, even if they are not getting vaccinations. He vaccinates yearly for the first 3 years, and has now started cutting back to every 2-3 years after that. Some areas may require annual rabies vaccinations. We run a geriatric profile annually on our older cats.

Regardless of whether he vaccinates or not, my vet ALWAYS examines my cats. He will do screenings for any ear or mouth problems, check their skin, coats, eyes, weight, etc. If anything looks odd I get advice on any treatment. Even though I keep a close eye on my babies, he has uncovered things that I didn't detect (for example, he looked at Bogart at age 11 and observed signs of early CRF). I'm usually in there anywhere from 10-15 minutes per cat.

His rates: $15 for the exam, plus cost of the vaccinations if he does them.

If your vet is simply giving your babies a shot and sending you home, I would either talk to him about giving them at least a good visual exam, and if they are not willing to do that, find another vet. 30 seconds for $32 doesn't sound right.
post #5 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Momofmany
Regardless of whether he vaccinates or not, my vet ALWAYS examines my cats. He will do screenings for any ear or mouth problems, check their skin, coats, eyes, weight, etc. If anything looks odd I get advice on any treatment.
Ditto here. I take my cats in each year for an annual checkup that includes the above. I'll also discuss my food choices and anything else I may have read on the boards that I want his opinions on, and to check that he is up to date on info too. I get about 15 mins. Our fee is $45. It's called a "wellness" exam here.

As for that "mechanic", he's the dumba$$. Cars get serviced, or "maintained" every so often to get the fluids and connections checked and refilled if you don't do it yourself. My car brand suggests checkups at 30K and 60K mileage. So you are right on the ball here.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Momofmany
Regardless of whether he vaccinates or not, my vet ALWAYS examines my cats. He will do screenings for any ear or mouth problems, check their skin, coats, eyes, weight, etc. If anything looks odd I get advice on any treatment. I'm usually in there anywhere from 10-15 minutes per cat.
Ditto here, though the charge is currently about $20, though that depends on the exchange rate. Our vet recommends biannual exams from about the age of seven or eight, and blood panels for geriatric cats. As far as worming is concerned, I pick up a paste, which is given over three days, from the vet's office about a week before I take JC in for his annual shots. He only goes out on his leash or balcony, so thus far worms haven't been a problem. The paste is just in case I miss something. Our last cat was outdoors most of the day, and wandered pretty far, so I used to worm him every three months.
post #7 of 19
My vet always looks the cats over carefully when I bring them in.

Actually, he calls it an "annual exam" to de-emphasize the "shots" aspect, because he advocates only vaccinating cats who are at risk, and of course rabies as required by law. The annual exam (or more frequent for older cats) is his chance to check for problems - spotting a problem early can save a lot of heartbreak and/or expense.

If you're otherwise happy with your vet, try talking to him about your concerns. Some people really do only want "shots" and get upset if a vet tries to do more, because of possible expense. He might just be used to that. But if he doesn't seem to care, I'd find another vet.

We don't deworm our indoor cats unless we see tapeworm segments (from eating fleas). If we do, we just ask the vet for tapeworm pills. But our vet does an annual "fecal check" on our outdoor cats, because they could potentially pick up other types of parasites. They take a stool sample with a tool about the size of a thermometer, and check for parasite eggs. If there are any, the vet gives the cat a prescription dewormer.

Hope this helps.
post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
My vet is the most expensive in town but I chose him because he actually owns/runs a wild animal shelter in his spare time. Something like 75% of the huge cost is on him (he has like 20 lions/tigers/etc that were mistreated or abandoned) and he only gets about 25% in donations and govt aid. So I figure the extra money is kind of like supporting his cause which I think is awesome and I don't usually mind doing it.. I just wish he would atleast take the cat out of the carrier and look at him for a minute. I mean I can get rabies shots at clinics for wayyyy cheaper or even at other vets so I almost expect more. I guess I'm just going to have to say something but I'm kind of scared that I'll get an $80 bill or something.. I hate sounding cheap but I'm going to have to ask for prices because I'm so not in a good financial state right now.. This guy is an amazing person though so I'm sure everything will work out ok.. THanks for the replies
post #9 of 19
I have always asked for Gus's teeth to be looked at during his visits. it's the least they can do the $40.
post #10 of 19
Rosie goes for her boosters in june, but while she's there he checks her teeth, her ears, checks her heart, and weighs her, then gives her claws a manicure!.
Susan
post #11 of 19
Perhaps when you call for the appointment (or to confirm the appointment if you already have it), you could ask what the price is for a wellness exam and vaccinations - that way you'd know ahead of time what to expect.

Our vet charges about $40 for the exam, and another $20 or so for the vaccines (depending on what you get), but he does a very thorough checkup, including an EKG.

Here's the American Animal Hospital Association's article about wellness exams and what to expect:

Preventive Care - Wellness Exams
post #12 of 19
tuxedokitties, I keep getting a "page cannot be found" error with your link.
post #13 of 19
I have two cats .. the young one just got her shots since the shelter I got her from didnt give them , who knows why not... My vet gave her a quick check ears heart eyes wt and her shots for the proce of shots no office call for shots, plus he wormed her since I didnt think the liquid I gave did much..

Today I took my"sister" for a problem and got the 45 office call but my beef was 125 for xrays ... so my pt is differnet services often different rates at least where I live..
post #14 of 19
Anytime one of my cats walks into the vet's office there is a standard 34 dollar "office visit" fee. This does include a hands-on exam and a nail clipping, if I ask for it. Costs of shots, medicine, blood work, etc. costs extra. (Unless I've been there three times that month already and am in a panic about the state of one of my cats. They've done the stuff they needed to do, handed me a bag of medicine and sent me home for the cost of an office visit before. I guess it's like one of those "free coffee cards" that gas stations have. Buy 10 cups and get the 11th free type deals? Well, in my case it's pay for two semesters of his kid's college fund, and get the third semester free.)
post #15 of 19
If anyone can understand what i am asking I would like some answers. I have always just kept up with the normal tests and vac/shots and dental on all my furrys. Since this is the first time I am buying a boy part of the contract states I have 4 days after purchase to have him vet checked. What does this mean? as it also says vaccination with FIP vaccine will void this contract what does that mean? I am confused since they guarentee it is in good health, up to date vac, and up to a years age against any debilitating physical condition that is inherited or genetic(the only thing I do understand) Can anyone help me understand what it is saying? Thanks! Donna
post #16 of 19
We don't take our cats for check ups - the vet is only 5 minutes down the road if we have a problem though!
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmcwlvssr
If anyone can understand what i am asking I would like some answers. I have always just kept up with the normal tests and vac/shots and dental on all my furrys. Since this is the first time I am buying a boy part of the contract states I have 4 days after purchase to have him vet checked. What does this mean? as it also says vaccination with FIP vaccine will void this contract what does that mean? I am confused since they guarentee it is in good health, up to date vac, and up to a years age against any debilitating physical condition that is inherited or genetic(the only thing I do understand) Can anyone help me understand what it is saying? Thanks! Donna
Hi,

I am sure a breeder will respond to this but from my understanding, the contract is the breeder's way to ensure that the kitten you buy is healthy when you receive him and the vet's visit provides that evidence in case something develops later. It is a type of protection for the breeder, for you and for the kitten. A responsible breeder is going to want to ensure that their babies go to responsible homes. Not everyone realizes what is involved in looking after a cat when they first get one, and the breeder is stating their commitment to ensuring a healthy kitten, but that you agree to take on that responsibility when you take on the kitten.

Regarding the FIP, there are concerns about the effectiveness - or ineffectiveness- of the vaccine and my vet no longer recommends providing it. The breeder is again trying to ensure, to the best of her ability, that her kitten remains healthy after it has left her care. She believes that there are risks associated with the FIP vaccination and accepts no responsibility for any health concerns that arise if you administer this vaccine. Some breeders also make this exclusion for the FeLeuk vaccine too. I am not sure what option the breeder has if you did give the kitten the FIP vaccine - it sounds like she could demand the return of the cat. You might want to clarify that with her, but if you don't intend to give the FIP vaccine, it shouldn't pose any problems.

So you are getting a somali? I LOVE those!

Kathryn
post #18 of 19
Anyone worthy of being called a veterinarian will give a cat a thorough exam, not just vaccinations. The point of an annual vet visit IS an exam. All cats need to have at least an annual check-up because a vet can detect problems that you can't. One of the other members mentioned having the teeth looked at and that is a crucial part of the exam. Most people don't check their cat's teeth and even if they do, wouldn't necessarily be able to spot the potential problems a vet could. One of my cats had a very painful condition called feline resorptive lesions and had to have 2 teeth extracted. I had no idea until she went for her annual visit.

Annabelle, I know you support what the vet is doing for wildlife, but your first priority has to be your cats. No matter how good of a person he is, if he isn't providing thorough care for your cats, make a donation to his cause and take your cats to another vet who will provide the attention your cats need.
post #19 of 19
The link must have moved...
Here is a current one:

Wellness Exams
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