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Cougar kills a man

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,107812,00.html
Saw this on todays morning news. Very sad
I don't think they should kill the cat though...

Peace,
Brandon
post #2 of 17
It sounds like the mountain lion has already been killed.
post #3 of 17
It is very sad. The problem is, once a wild cat gets a taste of human flesh, they aggressively go after more. At least that is what I've heard/read.
post #4 of 17
Here's another article about the story from CNN. In this one, it states the the cat was actually stalking the deputies as they were searching for it.

http://www.cnn.com/2004/US/West/01/0...ion/index.html

If the cat was actually feeding on the bikers, which by all indication it was, it needed to be killed. And if this is the case, it's one of the first that I know of. Mountain lions are not usually man-eaters. Tamme is right, though. Once a big cat starts it doesn't stop. Think about it - which is easier prey, a fast deer or a slow human?

P.S. Moving this to IMO.
post #5 of 17
Yep, this was on my local news the other day. Sad indeed.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Lorie D.
It sounds like the mountain lion has already been killed.
post #7 of 17
Yes, it's very sad, but I believe the authorities did the right thing by killing the cat. The "two strikes" rule is generally applied in the US for large mammalian predators (cougars, wolves, bears - though it has never had to be applied to a wolf.) One attack may be because the animal was threatened or startled, but two indicates a possible pattern.

George
post #8 of 17
Once an animal develops a taste for human flesh, it does not stop. I'm sure that the recent fires decimated the cougar's natural prey and it found an easy alternative source of food. Face it, humans are slow and relatively defenseless, against an 80-lb cat.

Our mountain lions have been sticking to their own ranges, lately. We DO have problem with rabid bobcats, though. On Monday, a bobcat attacked a groundskeeper, at Ventana Country Club. The cat's corpse was subsequently found and has tested positive for rabies.

Also on Monday, another bobcat attacked a woman, in her yard. It got away and turned up, Tuesday, in a driveway. As it prepared to attack a woman, her husband pushed her out of the way and bore the brunt of the attack. The cat retreated and then returned. The man chased it away, with a pichfork.

Later that day, it attacked a Shar-pei, which had to be euthanized, as it was not up-to-date on its rabies shot. Wednesday, the cat was spotted by an electric company crew, from a cherry-picker. At every sighting, the cat was reported as foaming at the mouth and puddles of foam were found at each site.

It is surmised that the cat is dead by now. Foaming is a sign of end-stage rabies and the animal usually dies within 48 hours. Fish & Wildlife want to find the body, though. Anything feeding on the corpse or anybody handling it, can be exposed to the disease.

This outbreak is being traced to rabid foxes, coming out of the Rincon Mountains, east of town. A major fire, last summer, has driven them into populated areas. Last week, a rabid fox nipped a woman, in Sabino Canyon.

Ike is current on his shots and Pearl is getting hers, tomorrow. She's good until the end of February but, I'll feel better doing it now. The most recent bobcat sighting was about 5 miles from my house.
post #9 of 17
Its so sad they had to kill such a beautiful animal. My stepdad owns cougars and has for many years, just recently the big male he had died of old age. They are such beautiful animals. Its so sad that the cougar is put at fault for killing someone when its humans who have envaded the cougars habit. Once any big cat thats raised wild gets used to being around humans, and loses its fear, it becomes very dangerous. We once kept a wild cougar that was suppose to be released into the wild but things happened and we got stuck with her. She was vicious and lost her fear of us. She got out one day and I was standing on the front porch and she started running for me. Luckily my stepdad already new she was out and had been around the corner with a gun. He shot her and saved me, but he did not fatally wound her. She was treated and kept until she died of a nasty disease. The other cougars he has were raised in captivity, not to be wild, but they are also fed strictly frozen foods so they don't develop a taste for fresh meat or blood. They are beautiful animals...and It's so sad to see so many big cats being killed.
post #10 of 17
A wild animal in captivity remains wild. It may be subdued and famliarised itself with the surroundings but it is still wild. It may not have the finesse in hunting skills and capabilities of the same species in the wild but by no means is it domesticated.

It's sad that the cougar was killed but it was the correct thing to do. Large predators are not necessarily man eaters. Often there are factors contributing to such a behaviour like illness, injury, age and opportunistic.

With urban sprawl ever increasing, unless a way of co-existing with the environment is established, then a species will become extinct.
post #11 of 17
Having to kill the cougar was sad, but necessary. Apparently this particular cougar already had food in the form of the remains of the man he'd already killed, but still attacked the woman. We'll have to see what the DNA analysis of the stomach contents shows. This has gotten so much coverage. My mom called today, and started telling me about the attack, and was surprised to hear that I'd already read about it on the CNN Web site and in our local newspaper. We humans have encroached on animals' territories so much that such attacks aren't surprising. Living in Europe, with such a high population density, I can really see it. Aside from wildcats (hard to distinguish from a large tiger cat, though they have bushy tails), and foxes, there are some lynxes (reintroduced), a pack of wolves (7 or 8) living on an abandoned military base in eastern Germany, and a few stray bears who have wandered in from Eastern Europe - that's about it for non-human and non-avian predators in Germany. I hope the U.S. and Canada don't reach that point.
post #12 of 17
A new study, completed in December, states that mountain lions get a lot closer to human beings than previously thought:

http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/science....ap/index.html
post #13 of 17
I feel so sorry for the people who have lost their life or have been hurt by an animal. If I had a animal that attacked a human the first thing I would do would be getting it put to sleep I mean c'mon it's not worth the risk.
post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thats not a very nice thing to say.
post #15 of 17
Last year there was another mountain lion event in CA. It happened to be in my moms friends backyard in Orangevale, CA. She (the mountain lion) was in the tree and scared to death, but the police didn't feel like waiting 10 minutes for animal control to come get her, so they shot her instead. She hadn't injured anyone, and if she was hungry, she would have already eaten the two dogs in the backyard. Yet instead she was scared of them and wouldn't come down. Does that sound like a good reason to kill her? I DON'T THINK SO!


Also, in Northern California people keep building housing developments in the mountain lions home, and then when one comes down looking for somewhere to live, everyone gets outraged that there is a wild animal by THEIR home. Even though it was never their home in the first place. We need more wildlife sanctionaries and land for them to live on without human contact.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by chixyb
Also, in Northern California people keep building housing developments in the mountain lions home, and then when one comes down looking for somewhere to live, everyone gets outraged that there is a wild animal by THEIR home. Even though it was never their home in the first place. We need more wildlife sanctionaries and land for them to live on without human contact.
I agree. The real problem isn't the mountain lions, but overpopulation and urban sprawl.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally posted by chixyb
Last year there was another mountain lion event in CA. It happened to be in my moms friends backyard in Orangevale, CA. She (the mountain lion) was in the tree and scared to death, but the police didn't feel like waiting 10 minutes for animal control to come get her, so they shot her instead. She hadn't injured anyone, and if she was hungry, she would have already eaten the two dogs in the backyard. Yet instead she was scared of them and wouldn't come down. Does that sound like a good reason to kill her? I DON'T THINK SO!
I get so mad when people do this.

My town council wanted to kill all of the crows in the area, and were even giving bounties this summer because people were complaining that they were too nosie(sp) and because they wanted to stop the spreed of West Nile which is totally stupid because crows show the symptons like 4 days after contracting the diesease. The health board of Canada put a stop to that.

Just Stupid Stupid people in this world.
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