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Kidney Failure in Older Cats

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am a mama of 2 cats (was 3 cats). My 14 years old cat had to be put to sleep because of kidney failure. I'm am very sad. Lessons learned were... kidney failure is the second biggest killer of older cats. They recommend annual screenings for all cats over 7 years old by taking a urine sample. I HIGHLY recommend this! My vet told me the day my cat was put to sleep about her kidney failure. Symptoms are: lack of appetite, weight loss, exessive thirst and urination, poor hair coat, oral ulcers, vomiting, lethargy, weakness.
I wish you all health cats!
post #2 of 18
I am soooo sorry for your loss and thank you for giving us a heads-up.

Helen
post #3 of 18
That's really sad, and I'm so sorry for your loss.

This is just FYI: For cats who are going to be put under anesthesia, the results of the pre-anesthesia blood work will also detect kidney problems. Two years my cat, Snowball who was 10 years old at that time, went under anesthesia for routine teeth cleaning. The results of the blood work showed he had early kidney disease. He was immediately put on a strict diet of K/D, and the blood work is re-done every six months. We had no idea there was anything wrong with him prior to this, but so far the disease has not progressed.
post #4 of 18
I sorry you had to lose a loved-one. Thanks for sharing your experience with those of us younger cat owners.

Quote:
Originally posted by Lorie D.

This is just FYI: For cats who are going to be put under anesthesia, the results of the pre-anesthesia blood work will also detect kidney problems. Two years my cat, Snowball who was 10 years old at that time, went under anesthesia for routine teeth cleaning. The results of the blood work showed he had early kidney disease.
I have a question about the pre-anesthesia blood work. Is that the same thing the vet gives us the option to have done before we spay or neuter (either cats or dogs) that has to do with whether or not they'll be able to handle anesthesia? I have always opted out because it usually added another $20-40 on to the cost. I figured that my pets where young and healthy enough not to be too concerned. (As they're still healthy now, I figure it's an expense that I saved myself.)
post #5 of 18
lovemypets, yes it's the same test.
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by Lorie D.
lovemypets, yes it's the same test.
Thanks Lorie.
Is there a recommended age I should have this test done? Do vets generally suggest it other than for pre-anesthesia? Our cats are all under 2 years of age. I give them Cranberry/Taurine supplements with Lycopine (sp?) because I know it is good for urinary tract health. BUT, there is still so much I have yet to learn about cat health.
post #7 of 18
Originally posted by lovemypets
Quote:
Is there a recommended age I should have this test done? Do vets generally suggest it other than for pre-anesthesia?
It might be best to discuss this with your vet and get his/her professional opinion regarding your individual animals. Also, there are very knowledgeable people who post in this forum that might be able to give you more information.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks Lorie and to everyone else for responding. I just discovered this website. I am going to file an allegation with the Board of Veterinary about a Cat Clinic. My cat had all the symptoms for kidney failure and they didn't even mention it. Instead they were putting her on anti-acid pills and changing her food because of her vomiting. I'm really upset that my cat had to suffer with this because of the vet.

My other cat, Max, recently had dental surgery. I will ask about the blood work and his kidney's now! And then I am going to switch vets.

Our pets are part of our family! And I miss her now very much.
post #9 of 18
Kidney failure is a very quiet disease. Its usually not caught early. I lost my Maine Coon to kidney failure at the age of 14. It takes a very observant mommy or daddy to catch it early. If it is caught early, then weekly fluid injections can keep your kitty around for a long time. There are websites dedicated to this. Your vet can teach you how to give the injections.
post #10 of 18
Gwen- I removed the name of the clinic from your post. I am sorry you lost your cat, but kidney disease can really be the silent killer and unless you really know what to look for, it can be missed for quite awhile. I wish you luck in filing your grievance, but because of legal issues, I would ask you to let the clinic stay anonymous on the boards. Thanks!
post #11 of 18
Gwen,
I'm very sorry for your loss. My Patrick has CRF and when he was first diagnosed I found these two websites to be invaluable..it is worth a look over for you re your questions concerning your other kitties. best wishes to you,

Feline CRF Site - Avatar Site
and
Tanya's UK Website on CRF Though Tanya's site is a UK site, it is one of the best I've ever seen on issues such as how to know when it is time etc., and really goes into various treatments, including some on holistic treatments.
post #12 of 18
Originally posted by gbriston
Quote:
My other cat, Max, recently had dental surgery. I will ask about the blood work and his kidney's now! And then I am going to switch vets.
To the best of my knowledge, the blood work will show two separate results for Max's kidney function. And when my cat, Snowball, was diagnosed, I think these results were for the BUN and creatinine levels. So if the vet just gives you some numbers, make sure you know whether or not these numbers are within the normal range for kidney function.

This is also to the best of my knowledge: A cat who is in the early stages of kidney disease will not show any clinical symptoms.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by lovemypets

Is there a recommended age I should have this test done?
The place I always get my cats spayed/neutered at recommends the bloodwork for a cat over 5 years of age.
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by lovemypets
I have a question about the pre-anesthesia blood work. Is that the same thing the vet gives us the option to have done before we spay or neuter (either cats or dogs) that has to do with whether or not they'll be able to handle anesthesia? I have always opted out because it usually added another $20-40 on to the cost. I figured that my pets where young and healthy enough not to be too concerned. (As they're still healthy now, I figure it's an expense that I saved myself.)
A cat can seem perfectly healthy in early stages of renal disease. The kidneys are usually at least 75% gone before a cat will start showing sypmtoms. Kidney disease shows no mercy on young versus old. Hallie is 2 years old and has begun renal failure already (I just got her 1 1/2 months ago). If the vet had been more insistent and the extra money had been spent on her 6-9 months ago, probably she wouldn't have gotten this far, this fast. Proper diet can slow the disease down significantly.
post #15 of 18
Today I added an excellent link to the CRF Information Page on my website. It has a lot of really good information on it.
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally posted by mzjazz2u
Today I added an excellent link to the CRF Information Page on my website. It has a lot of really good information on it.
Yay...it's one of my favorite sites on this, and I too have it on my links page, great source of information.
post #17 of 18
Yeah it is a good site. I figured I'd add it in case someone needs some information.
post #18 of 18
I know also have a PKD/CRF forum on my website for people to share their experiences and just chit chat about the disease. There is a link to the forum at the bottom of my homepage: www.purrfectpurrsians.net
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