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Making a feral cat shelter

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

Well I made a cat shelter out of a big Styrofoam container you can get at petsmart. Cut a hole in it then clued some mylar to the cover and bottom then put some straw in. Looks real cozy:bigthumb: 

post #2 of 15

Since you're in Michigan (I'm in NW Ohio - so weather is similar!) they'll be very grateful for the shelter very soon! I've never seen those at Petsmart - we make ours out of doubled-up (as in small one inside bigger one) large plastic storage bins, with styrofoam between the bins for insulation. Otherwise very similar. We have access to electricity, so we add outdoor-rated kitty heating pads to the ones that cords can reach. Once it gets very cold - the kitties always choose the heated ones (no one said they're not smart!). But even unheated - they'll be thrilled for the shelter! Yeah you for caring!

post #3 of 15

Yes, anything you can provide them to shelter them is really critical in the cold months.  The straw and Styrofoam will keep them nice and cozy.

post #4 of 15

I have used two rubbermaids (one inside the other) with straw, a feral villa my DH built and sterlite containers with Reflectix insulation lined on the inside and then an outdoor approved heat pad in the bottom.  This is one of the favorites!  We call them the "magic boxes".  Last season my two ferals were still wanting to use them in mid May! 

 

Thank you for helping the ferals.

post #5 of 15

I have seen a lot of posts about feral cat shelters lately on my Facebook feed. Here's a few simple DIY cat houses.

post #6 of 15

Those are great, thanks for sharing the photos.

 

Back when I was doing TNR, I regularly looked on craigslist for free dog houses.  Picked up several of the plastic 'dogloos" for feral colonies.

post #7 of 15

I use a large cat carrier with styrofoam insulation, straw and the cat approved heating pad...i have had it in the garage the past two years , leaving the back garage door open for them but that's not real safe for US!  the door into the house is inside the garage and not exactly intruder proof!

i covered the top of the carrier with massive amounts of styrofoam and heavy tarp to keep rain and snow off.....

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 


I had a kitty door put in on my garage door so far 3 of the feral cats have figured out how to use it. I think when the temperature drops real low more will figure it out.

Myra

post #9 of 15
I did the double storage container with insulation I between. I have three kittens that decided to live in my yard,and although the nights have only reached 50 here I felt sad forcing them to go outdoors after they would come in to eat. After two weeks they stopped entering it and I looked inside and noticed another cat had sprayed inside of it. Ugh had to take it apart and clean it, then make the door only big enough for the kittens to enter it. They have reclaimed their little home.

How do you keep others from spraying in it, they are eventually going to grow and I will have to open the door up some more.
post #10 of 15
I have a rule. If a cat sprays in my yard anywhere, said cat gets trapped and fixed pronto. That may be the only way you can keep other cats from spraying, unfortunately.

Is there a shed you can put it in, with a door only the kittens can access? They have cat doors that work on a chip in their collars you can buy. That will certainly protect them from other cats and/or predators, too.
post #11 of 15
I just got a trap 2 weeks ago and dropped the first boy off to be fixed this morning. Hoping that stops them from spraying, especially since my windshield seems to be one of their favorite spots. I have 3 other boy cats to go, and a few females. I am paying myself so it's kind of expensive, doubt I could afford one of those collar doors.
post #12 of 15

Well, every one you get fixed will cut down on the spraying.  And once everyone's hormones are settled down, you may find other cats don't dare enter their territory.  That's what happened to me.  Once I got my two boys done, the feral and strays in the area will not come into my yard.

post #13 of 15
I have seen first-hand eartipped cats still spraying. My approach to that is letting it be. It id refreshing to not try to control matters of this nature. Like bird poop...in the end it is no big deal. The smell itself is an awesome rodent repellent! On another note, I have been. Making shelters that offer escape routes without compromising warmth. I make two tote shelters connected with rubber plumbing and venting pipes from lowes. This way the cats can move easily out of danger into other shelter and out. They love it! My colony site has coyote and racoons....also when deciding on insulation make sure to understand R factor labeling.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocho View Post

I have seen first-hand eartipped cats still spraying. My approach to that is letting it be. It id refreshing to not try to control matters of this nature. Like bird poop...in the end it is no big deal. The smell itself is an awesome rodent repellent! On another note, I have been. Making shelters that offer escape routes without compromising warmth. I make two tote shelters connected with rubber plumbing and venting pipes from lowes. This way the cats can move easily out of danger into other shelter and out. They love it! My colony site has coyote and racoons....also when deciding on insulation make sure to understand R factor labeling.


I would love to see a picture of your shelters.  Sounds awesome! 

 

One of my ear tipped ferals who was neutered 4 years ago still sprays to mark his territory.  One of my neighbors lets 2 of her cats outside and there is a turf war for territory.  The neutered male sprays too.  The are always spraying the trees and shrubs.  It's now they mark their territory.  I think there is nothing I can do to stop it!! 

post #15 of 15
I will take some pics. It can be a dilemma in some situations where the winters are brutal but predators are present. I couldn't leave those cats reliant on shelters that could also be a death trap. The connecting is through 6" aluminum venting fittings that have these pull back tabs. They are attached with 6" rubber plumbing coupler that has metal bands for tighting. I line inside with gorilla tape. Entrance holes on opposing side so no draft. I also use spray foam insulation inbetween the tote that goes into outer tote. This can be continued with as many shelters as needed. My cats seem to love the tunnel fun and alleys inbetween it creates.
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