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Do you think a person is sick when ........Warning not for soft hearts

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
OK , I know a woman and she has many cats . She also has finacial problems . She take good care of her animals and when needet she go's to the vet . Now the thing is when a cat has died and she don't have the money to crimate (sp) the cat she is sticking the dead cat in here freezer . I think she has 3 cats now in there . That is the same freezer where she has food in and her ice cupes and don't mind that her food and ice is together with the 3 cats . Each cats are in a plastic bag . Now my question is , do you think she is sick in here head or something ? Or do you think thats ok what she is doing . So what is your opinion about that ???
post #2 of 27
When I lived in alaska one of our cats died in the middle of winter. I called the vet and he told me to put it in the freezer in a plastic bag till break-up. I couldn't do it. I ended up taking the cat to another vet and they donated the body to a company that made fertilzer. It just creeped me out to think of a cat's body in my big freezer even though I knew it was dead.
post #3 of 27
I think keeping dead animals in the same place where you keep your food is unhealthy and unsanitary (I could never in a million years do that), and could be a sign of some sort of mental illness. As far as cremating the cats, they could always be buried in the backyard. (That is what my family did for pets that died.)
post #4 of 27
I think that's odd, that would majorly creep me out and doesn't seem very respectful of my dear companion. Cremation or burial in her backyard like Sue says, or what MA did, would be a more normal thing to do.
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Wel she cant buried her cats in her back yard , she is only renting the place she live in . And when she move one day she wants to take them with her .

I personal could not do that myself , I never ever would place any food in there in my hole life . I think I even would throu that thing away . I went there to visit in the summer and even brought my own cold drink with me . Just the thought she may offer me some ice ......eeewwww . I think that she may have some kind of mental illness as Sue said . I think she also could leave the dead cat at the vet office . I don't know what they do with dead animals there , but anything better then my own icebox where my food is in . I just wonder what she will do when she run out of space , that thought scares me .....
But I always was wondering what people thought about that , thats why I posted this .
post #6 of 27
My sister in law raised Chinchillas and when one died unexpectantly, the vet couldn't do an immediate autopsy to find cause. Since she had a colony of them, she wanted it done. She put her (in plastic and inside a box) in her freezer and being the procastinator that she was, didn't get it done for a while.

My husband and I moved in with her for a few months when we moved (out of state) to her area and we were in process of settling. I remember my first night in her house when I was scrounging thru her fridge and freezer to see what she had in stock (I was planning on cooking them dinner each night as we weren't yet working and I thought the gesture to be a good one). I grabbed the box and started to open it to see what food goods were in there. She kind of lunged at me and said "don't open that.....its a chinchilla".

OK, that really weirded me out but like Jennifer, I soon forgot it was in there. She finally gave it a proper burial when she moved out a year later.

I don't think the lady is sick, I know Jennifer very well and I wouldn't call her sick, yet she did the same thing for different reasons.
post #7 of 27
so when the hubby asks where the pork chops are,just tell him
their under the cat LOL
post #8 of 27
I think it would be best for this lady to ask her veterinary clinic if her deceased cats could be stored in one of their special freezers until she could pay for the cremation. I know my own veterinary clinic would be very willing to do this for someone.
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
To store the cat/s by her vet would cost her money and money she don't have . I also would burried them in the back yard and plant some flowers over them , the owner would never know . Or what think would be the best to let the vet have them to do what ever they do with animals . At least it would not be in here freezer .
post #10 of 27
If I were her, I would sell the carcass for research or to a taxidermist(she needs the money right?). I would assume the cats did not die from any disease right? If they did putting them with food is dangerous. Otherwise, don't you guys put your raw steaks, chicken, fish in the freezer? What are those but dead animals without fur/feathers?
BTW I wouldn't put my dead pets in the freezer nor would I cremate them. I bury the dead.
post #11 of 27
Well, 3 might be pushing the limits of normal, but I remember when we had rabbits and one died we would put it in the freezer until proper arrangements could be made.
post #12 of 27
Most Vets will cremate an animal that has passed away. If she would have left the cat at the vets, they would have cremated it.
post #13 of 27
Originally posted by PurrfectCatlove
Quote:
To store the cat/s by her vet would cost her money and money she don't have
This is a FREE service provided by my veterinary clinic, but I'm sure this varies a lot and depends on the policies of different clinics.
post #14 of 27
All right, here is a little known fact. You know how popular wildlife and nature paintings are? Artists doing lifelike paintings of birds, small animals, that sort of thing? Well, what do you think some artists do for reference? They have to get all of the details right.....

They keep the specimens in their freezers. And they take the critter out of the freezer, paint for a while, and when it starts to thaw (eeeewwwww) they put it back. And artists I know, who are not rich, can't afford a separate freezer, so when you open the door to look for ice cream, you might see a little face staring out at you.

So this is more common than you think.

Its not particularly unhealthy, although I would not want a loved family pet to be looking back at me when I go for ice cubes.
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
LorieD , if the service would be free for the cats to store there , now I really wonder about her even more . Maybe she just don't want to part from her animals ???
post #16 of 27
I think its sick.
post #17 of 27
Hedi, if she is a true animal hoard then you are right, she probably does not want to part with the animal. I recently did an article on this subject and found to my horror that most hoarders don't use the freezer, they stack the carcasses behind the couch or something. At least she is using the freezer which will cut out the possibility of extra stench.

The article I refer to is called Littered Lives and is in our Cat Snips section.
post #18 of 27
Hedi.. I wonder if you know the same person I do

There's a lady on another board that has posted she has over 30 cats.. and had to keep one in the freezer for MONTHS because she couldnt do anything else with it.. eesh I dunno
post #19 of 27
My reaction is that she might be a bit eccentric, but not "sick". We're lucky in that we are homeowners and also have an orchard where we can bury deceased pets (more about that later). I couldn't bear to have a beloved pet "disposed of" by the vet, because, at least here, they are ground and used as animal feed (BSE was the result of ground sheep being fed to cattle) or fertilizer. So if the ground were frozen solid, I might very well be tempted to deep freeze a pet in several layers of plastic until we could have a proper burial. Of course, if the ground were frozen solid, we'd be able to store the body outside. Hopefully it'll never come to that. A few years ago my husband discovered what looked like a grave in our orchard, which is in a remote area. He contacted the police, and they exhumed the body. It was a German shepherd. The police investigated (illegal disposal of animal remains), and the owner turned himself in once it made the paper. The man lived in a rented apartment, couldn't afford cremation or burial (and pet cemetaries are rare here anyway), and simply couldn't bear the thought of his dog ending up as feed. I felt bad about having brought in the police, but we were afraid that it might be a human body. I question more the woman's having so many cats that she can't afford cremation, and wonder if she has enough money to provide adequate food and medical care. At the risk of sounding cynical - all those steaks, chops and roasts in our freezers are also parts of animal carcasses.
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
She don't eat meat , only her finance (sp) does . So she don't have any meat in that freezer as far as I know . But all her veggie's are in there and ice cream and ice cube's . Now I am talking about a fridge , the top level where the little freezer part is . She had a freezer in the old place where she used to live . Her mom died and she had to go to new mexico . In that time her freezer broke and her boyfriend burried all the cats she had in the freezer . Ok now , I think I need to say that she has a house full of Feline leukemia and all the other desease going on .I have no clue how many she had in there , but I think she had at least 10 new places where her cats were burried when I visited her a while later when she come back from new mexico . I think she is some what a hoarder , if there is something like that . When I meet her the first time she had way over 30 cats in her house , I think more around 40 but not sure of that . Now I talk about a huge old house with many rooms . In the beginning I did not know that she had all the desease running in her cats . Just after some time I found out . What did mad me mad at her was , that she keep adding cats and kittens to the sick ones with out separating them . I remember I went to the cat show in savannah with her and she were buying a balinese kitten for &600.00 dollars knowing she has to file bankrubsie . After only two years of life he died a few weeks ago . I guess today I just need to get it off my chest , I always grieve over her cats . Now she has 12 cats left in her house , unless she got a few new ones again . I talked to her number of times to let the cats run it course and wait a year or two and then get a healthy cat and each time you want a cat go to the vet first to make sure it is a healthy cat . Just when I think about that I get real about her . She is a sweet heart as a friend .
post #21 of 27
Generally vets store the animals in a freezer at the office. Most DO NOT cremate the animals unless the owner pays for the service (it can be very expensive!) The animal bodies are picked up by the vet's waste service and the bodies discarded according to local sanitation laws - usually in the dump.

I also know most vets generally have limited freezer space to store the bodies. The recommendation to put the cat in the freezer is actually a normal one. While most people would not store the animal for an extended time, isn't this the same animal that was getting up on your counters, trying to sneak food when you're sitting and eating in the living room, crawling in your lap on a regular basis, and sleeping by your head at night? If there was a risk of exposure it should have already happened, and with the body carefully wrapped in plastic the risk of disease exposure is pretty much zero. While is may seem a bit creepy, it really is the most sanitary way to keep a body if it's not going to be buried or cremated right away.
post #22 of 27
My Mom's cat died in the winter and the ground was way to frozen to bury him so she wrapped him in a towel, put him in a small cardboard coffin, put that inside of a plastic sack and froze him until spring. We took him out and buried him right next to his dog companinion of many years.

My MIL does taxidermy (yuck) and she freezes the animal until she can do something with them.

I do not think that this is wrong. I don't see how anything is going to be unsanitary or disgusting when everything in the freezer is frozen. Especially if you need to wait until a later time to take care of the animal. Now if one were to keep dead cat's in the freezer as a collection or for a few years then yes I think that is whacko.
post #23 of 27
Stepping in here as a Cat Breeder, sometimes when we have had a kitten die we have put them in the freezer(We have one for our food in the kitchen, but we also have one in the garage where we keep the cat meat in. If a kitten dies we like to keep it for a few weeks incase another kitten dies so we can find out what was wrong, but sometimes we will need to store them in the freezer because the wheelie bin doesn't come for 6 days and we don't want a dead animal in our bin so we take the frozen body out on the morning.

I don't think your friend has a mental illness but if she has kept them in theren for a long length of time aint that a bit disturbing??
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally posted by CharmsDad
Generally vets store the animals in a freezer at the office. Most DO NOT cremate the animals unless the owner pays for the service (it can be very expensive!) The animal bodies are picked up by the vet's waste service and the bodies discarded according to local sanitation laws - usually in the dump.

I also know most vets generally have limited freezer space to store the bodies. The recommendation to put the cat in the freezer is actually a normal one. While most people would not store the animal for an extended time, isn't this the same animal that was getting up on your counters, trying to sneak food when you're sitting and eating in the living room, crawling in your lap on a regular basis, and sleeping by your head at night? If there was a risk of exposure it should have already happened, and with the body carefully wrapped in plastic the risk of disease exposure is pretty much zero. While is may seem a bit creepy, it really is the most sanitary way to keep a body if it's not going to be buried or cremated right away.
The last cat we had cremated, it was very expensive. They stored him in their freezer for a wek free of charge because we didn't want him at home and then have to take him back. It's amazing how vets really feel for their clients in times like this.
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
The lady told me that it cost her $ 150.00 dollars - $ 200.00 dollars to cremate one cat , that is a lot of money if you don't have money from the start with . Maybe she is not sick I don't know . I know that I would not like to have one of my baby in the freezer . I do burried mine in the back yard .
post #26 of 27
The first time I ever had cremation offered as an option for a pet was when we lost a dog in 1992. As I recall, the cost was $120 plus the cost of a special box (another $75 I think.) After spending over $5,000 to try to save him that last bit hurt, but he was worth it. Every pet we've lost since then, and several special rescue efforts that I couldn't save, have been cremated. I build my own boxes now and have made them for several friends who have lost pets. We have a stack of boxes on a special shelf with pictures and assorted other special items.

The last animal I had cremated was a kitten which I was trying to coax in to rescue. I was also working on her mom. One of the kittens had previously been killed in our yard when she wondered in at night and I didn't see her and let the dogs out. Though our dogs are great with our cats this one they appear to have considered an invader. That kitten is burried in our Zen garden. The other kitten had finally allowed me to pet her slightly and I though she was on her way to be rescued, but she also wandered into our yard early the next morning. When the dogs ran out I heard a kitten scream and ran out and pushed them away. She died on the way to the vet even as I gave her CPR. (I teach pet first aid for the Red Cross. That makes me 0 for 2 on CPR, one person, one kitten.) "Little Kitty" was cremated and is on our special shelf ($125 - and I build her a special box).

Yes, this can be very expensive. $150-$200 is not out of line.

By the way, Mamma cat had her other litter. I finally coaxed her in and she's living in her bedroom with her three 12-week old girls. Mamma has been spayed and the kittens are scheduled to get spayed in just over three weeks. All are up to date on shots, dewormed, and healthy. Mamma is a sweetie and the kittens have been socialized and we're working on permanent (all indoor!) homes for them all. Mamma has a problem with dogs (duh!) but the dogs accept her and the kittens as part of the household.

George
post #27 of 27
When my childhood cat Pandora died several years ago on a Friday night, I put her (thoroughly wrapped and in a box) in the freezer until the crematory could pick her up Monday morning. I lived in an apartment, and the only alternative would have been to have the vet dispose of her for me. She would have been dumped in an area of the city landfill reserved for dead animals. I just couldn't do that to my sweet girl I'd had since I was 7 years old! If I remember correctly, the cremation cost about $90 - I did the very basic service & had her ashes returned in a very simple plastic container that I later replaced with a pretty wooden box.

It would probably cost her more to store the cats at a vet clinic than it would to cremate them. Some crematories offer a less expensive option where the pets are cremated together, and the ashes are scattered in a field instead of being returned. Perhaps she might want to consider this?

I feel for her, but then I honestly can't understand how anyone could keep so many cats, especially if her finances are so limited.
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