or Connect
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Care & Grooming › Why Does Frontline and Advantage Not Work For Fleas Now?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why Does Frontline and Advantage Not Work For Fleas Now?

post #1 of 67
Thread Starter 

Advantage wasn't working for the flea problem I had so I switched to Frontline. Cats are still itching at times. I just applied it last weekend. WHY are the fleas still not completely 100% dead? I don't have a huge problem here? We aren't being bitten. Not seeing them jumping and I vacuum often and have sprayed the carpeting. Vet said 3 months of treatment should solve the problem. This is month 2 and I'm still seeing no improvement:( I don't have money to switch to another brand until feb 28.

post #2 of 67
there have been some reports that certain fleas have become resistant to fipronil, the active ingredient in frontline. some of the evidence is anecdotal but there seems to be a significant amount of it.

due to this fact my vet stopped recommending/carrying frontline a couple of years ago and switched to revolution. i can say that revolution seems to work very, very well. i use it on some of my feral cats - the ones that i can apply it to - and we have no fleas at all.
post #3 of 67
Could it be that there are fleas in the bedding and carpeting that are hopping back on your kitties? All the pets in my house (5 at the time) got fleas last year and despite three treatments with Advantage, they were all still scratching. I think the cause was one of two possibilities: Fleas living in the carpets that found their way onto the nice clean animals, or I brought them home from my boyfriend's house (his cat has fleas just about all year round and since he's an indoor-outdoor cat, it's not financially sound to treat him for fleas). But I suppose it's kind of like antibiotics - when people use a certain one too much, the things they treat can become resistant. I wouldn't be surprised if some fleas are becoming resistant to flea treatments.
post #4 of 67
Thread Starter 

hmmm those are both good suggestions. I will have to try revolution. Thank you. Do you think one dose for each cat should work? My vet says the bombs don't really work as effectively and neither do the sprays. She says washing the bedding and vacuuming frequently do.

post #5 of 67

What spray did you use?  Not all sprays are equal.  The bedding needs washing hot - 60C - or discarding. 

post #6 of 67
Thread Starter 

I used adams flea and tick spray. 

post #7 of 67

I see Adams are rather shy on their website about the active ingredients in most of their products and suspect they are not of the best.  The link below has a lot of good including the active ingredients in the worthwhile sprays.  Brand names may vary, but use the details in it to choose one.

 

http://www.fabcats.org/owners/fleas/info.html

post #8 of 67

We were having a problem last year with fleas infestation in the house.  I don't like to use foggers and spray poison all over the walls and furniture, and I also have a parrot.  After doing some research, I went to the feed store and bought a bag of food grade diatomaceous earth.  You sprinkle it on the carpets, leave for a few hours, and then vacuum it up.  You can also put it around baseboards, on bedding, etc.  Worked like a charm....better than anything else I have tried.  You might have to do it a few times just to defeat the fleas hatch cycle.  You can also put it directly on the animals, and it works for ear mites too.!!!  It has to be FOOD GRADE (not the stuff in the garden or pool section, which contains toxic stuff).  Many feed stores carry it because farmers feed it to their livestock as a natural dewormer. (50# bag $24.00)  People also take it for a variety of benefits.  It also works in the yard.  It can also be fed to cats and dogs for skin and coat, and a natural wormer.....although I haven't done that.

 

Here is one of several websites I found that has information:  http://www.earthworkshealth.com/pets-animals.php

post #9 of 67
If you are seeing many fleas on the cats, then there are lots more in the environment. I would treat your home. Frontline does work, quite well. It is not a repellent and will only kill the fleas when they bite as far as I know. Do the cats go outside? If so, they (the fleas) might be hitching a ride inside the house as well. You could go with the Revolution but that is also a dewormer. Good luck!!vibes.gifvibes.gifvibes.gif
post #10 of 67

We've always used Frontline our vet refused to sell Advantage because it didn't last as long. About 5yrs ago we starting having trouble with frontline because we would put it on and it wouldn't get rid of them all. So we were told to switch between frontline and advantage. So we used Advantage the next month and it worked. We used the Advantage for a year and than switched back to frontline. It seemed to work. So we went a year with it. Than went back to Advantage again and it worked fine. This year we were supposed to go back to Frontline, we did and it didn't help. So two weeks in we also put Advantage on. So 1 mo. ago front line was put on, 2 weeks later Advantage was put on. We still have fleas. Not infested but we each see at least a flea every few hours. Our cats won't touch the ground. What should we try next? (the last time we had and infestation we put frontline on and it cleared it right up. I'm not sure what to do because if we get infested my daycare kids won't be able to come. I HAVE to Clear it up. any suggestions.

post #11 of 67

The ONLY thing that worked for my cat is a pill from the vet called Comfortis. It kills them instantly and wow, I have had problems for years and tried every flea treatment and natural remedy there is. I am so impressed. I don't know anything about it but it works.

post #12 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geneva View Post

The ONLY thing that worked for my cat is a pill from the vet called Comfortis. It kills them instantly and wow, I have had problems for years and tried every flea treatment and natural remedy there is. I am so impressed. I don't know anything about it but it works.

comfortis didnt help my cats at all and i cleaned like crazy

 

what about biospot?

post #13 of 67

The last time I used a topical flea killer, my vet gave me some Advantage Multi. It is a flea and tick killer and dewormer and ear mite killer all in one.

post #14 of 67

If you would like to try a non-chemical approach, this worked for me two years ago when I had an infestation so bad that I hated going home.  I researched fleas online and found that fleas will die if the humidity is 40% or below.  It took a while to get the infested room to 40%, but once I did, fleas were gone in a day.  To deal with any eggs left unhatched, I kept the humidity at 40% and vacuumed every day for four days.  There was no recurrence.  The only carpeted area I have is the end of the kitchen that is a dining area ( 12X10).  I had no problem in the hardwood areas of the house.  If the problem encompasses the entire house, I can see that this tactic may not be practical, but I can guarantee you that 40% humidity will dry the little devils out and you will neither breath nor ingest harmful chemicals.
 

post #15 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmie View Post

If you would like to try a non-chemical approach, this worked for me two years ago when I had an infestation so bad that I hated going home.  I researched fleas online and found that fleas will die if the humidity is 40% or below.  It took a while to get the infested room to 40%, but once I did, fleas were gone in a day.  To deal with any eggs left unhatched, I kept the humidity at 40% and vacuumed every day for four days.  There was no recurrence.  The only carpeted area I have is the end of the kitchen that is a dining area ( 12X10).  I had no problem in the hardwood areas of the house.  If the problem encompasses the entire house, I can see that this tactic may not be practical, but I can guarantee you that 40% humidity will dry the little devils out and you will neither breath nor ingest harmful chemicals.
 

how do you get it that low?

post #16 of 67

You definitely need a dehumidifier.  My dehumidifier defaults to 40% when I first turn it on, although I usually reset it to 55% when I use it in the basement.  40% is a comfortable setting for humans, but deadly to fleas.  It is nice to have a way to kill them without using the toxic chemicals.  If you dont have a dehumidifier, maybe you could borrow one from someone for 4 or 5 days.  Good luck.
 

post #17 of 67

Just an afterthought here - I think air conditioners naturally remove moisture from the air when they are turned on.  If you run an air conditioner you could get one of those little thermometer dials that also shows the humidity.  Then crank the air conditioner to what it takes to get the humidity to the 40%.  That might actually work faster than using just the dehumidifier.  Fleas like warm temperatures.  If you give it a try, I would be interested to know how fast that works.

post #18 of 67

carmie air conditioners dont work its like freezing in my moms room and it still has fleas -_- and there isnt cats in her room

 

and is it okay to us a dehumidafier when you have cats with URI?

post #19 of 67

A 40% humidity level is not a dangerous level for people or animals, but it is for fleas.  I cant see why it would cause any harm to a cat with a urinary problem.
 

post #20 of 67

I bring in rescue mama cats and kittens for foster so fleas are a recurring problem here. We try not to use to much chemical stuff in general so we use a multi approach to keeping it under control. I keep flea traps in the cat rooms, I vacuum every other day, sprinkling the carpets lightly the night before rotating between baking soda, salt (dries up eggs) and food grade diatomaceous earth / DE (lightly - lightly because it will kill a vacuum motor quickly!), I dust coats lightly with the DE, bathe them with dish soap (some people say Dawn, but I think any kind will work) if they are big enough and healthy enough), change and wash bedding often in hot water with vinegar in the wash and rinse, feed brewers yeast, and flea comb them. On bad years like this one in the midwest a treatment or something for one month is often necessary but otherwise the cheap approach and a some extra effort usually does the trick.
 

post #21 of 67

My vet has offered Revolution to control my kitties fleas. It seems to be working well. The way he explained it to me is that Revolution does not kill the fleas that land on the kitty. The only way it works is when the flea actually bites the kitty and then it will kill the flea. It also makes the fleas sterile so they can't keep reproducing. One application will last 1 month per kitty at which it is just applied to the nape of their neck. You still may see active fleas for a  short time, but eventually those fleas get hungry and can find their host for their next nourishing meal. Once they bite the killing cycle begins. I have two kitties and when I was down to my last vial of flea medication I treated the one kitty hoping the fleas that bit it would die and eventually wipe out the other fleas the other kitty was carrying on him and then my untreated kitty would become flea free. Don't know if that really works ,but it was worth a try. I hated to purchase more Revolution as it can be costly and it was going on winter when the fleas wouldn't be a problem any longer and the cats would be pretty much indoor kitties until spring. This year my kitties are outside and maybe because we have had so much damp rainy weather I have not seen a single flea or noticed the kitties scratching so I think I do not have any flea problems yet. Knock on wood.

 

Also I do not waste my money on the Walmart brand of flea medication which they claim is the generic version of Advantage. I have heard that the active ingredients are not measured precisely and you may be purchasing a product that could either have a lesser or more potent amount of the active ingredients to kill the fleas. Not enough medication will not kill the fleas and you wasted your money and too much medication could prove toxic to you pet. I just do not trust the junk being produced in China. I would rather spend a little more and know I am getting the precise dose and not doing harm to my precious furbabies. I do not want to poison them.

post #22 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carmie View Post

A 40% humidity level is not a dangerous level for people or animals, but it is for fleas.  I cant see why it would cause any harm to a cat with a urinary problem.
 


URI is an Upper Respiratory Infection, UTI is the one for Urinary Tract Infection. URI is one of the problems that cats with Feline Herpes have to be treated for more often.

post #23 of 67
fjaffeux: You are going to kill your cats if you keep giving them Frontline or Advantage every two weeks. Even if you think it is not working, do not use those products more than once a month. These are pesticides, and you are actually risking your animals' lives. You will end up with dead animals, and the fleas will still be there.

Find another solution.
post #24 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaat1220 View Post

fjaffeux: You are going to kill your cats if you keep giving them Frontline or Advantage every two weeks. Even if you think it is not working, do not use those products more than once a month. These are pesticides, and you are actually risking your animals' lives. You will end up with dead animals, and the fleas will still be there.

Find another solution.


Welcome to TCS. I totally agree that she is risking her cats lives. However, if you will look closely, the poster made her original post last July and has never posted again. So, the problem was either solved or the cats have died since then.

post #25 of 67

Have you tried the Soresto collar?  It works on fleas, ticks larvae etc, and it works for 8 months!  It's a fairly new product.  I got it for my three cats at Petco last year.  No bugs on my babies and it works out to be cheaper that Advantage or Frontline.  I also like the fact that you put it on and forget it - no monthly remembering needed!

post #26 of 67
If you read the warning label on Soresto, it advises to not let the cat sleep in bed with humans while wearing the collar and to not let children touch the collar. That sounds pretty toxic. When you think about it, flea collars are basically a ring of insecticide constantly near your cat's face for a really long period of time (8 months, in the case of Soresto). That cannot be healthy. Like most OTC flea products, they are mininally regulated and can be very dangerous. There are much better, safer alternatives for flea control. Then, there are all the scary human exposure studies that have been coming out over the last few years.

This is copied from an article I saw a few months ago:

The risk comes in when adult humans interact with or play with their pet while the pet is wearing a flea or tick collar. The humans get exposed to approximately 500 times the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe level of pesticides. This is according to a recent study by scientists at the Natural Resources Defense Council. Since children are that much smaller, their level can be 1000 times greater than what is safe for their small bodies to be exposed to. The study is a first of its kind.
External flea and tick products that contain certain pesticides leave residues on a pet's hair or fur that have the ability to cause brain damage and affect the nervous systems of both the pet and human being.
Read labels carefully because stores are still selling these products and the government does not have firm safety assessments in place to protect pets and pet lovers from the dangers the products possess.

And another:

Flea-collar manufacturers include warnings on the products to avoid exposure and to wash your hands thoroughly after handling the collars. Research has shown these measures are not enough to limit exposure. Studies have shown that, after just three days, residue from the collars on pet fur exceeded acceptable EPA exposure levels for children. Even after two weeks, 75 percent of pets still have unsafe levels of toxins.
post #27 of 67

The Vet told us when our cat was still scratching the fleas have to bite to die.  It seems horrible but unless the cat gets bit they do not have any way of killing the things.  I found out from an exterminator that I called about the carpet that to use 20MuleTeam Borax on the carpets was as effective as the sprays that contain harmful chemicals on them.  I did this every other day for 3 weeks and used Advantage II and my cat has been flea free for 2 years and the last year he has been treated by Sentry Fiproguard spot treatment instead of either Advantage or Frontline.  This is the generic type of Frontline but much cheaper in cost.  It works and the vet checks the cat every time he goes in and pronounces him flea free.  The 20MuleTeam needs to be sprinkled on lightly and worked in with a broom and left overnight before vacuuming it up and disposing of it immediately in a bag, not leave in vacuum.

 

Lots of work to get rid of the little pests but it can be done.

post #28 of 67

Revolution once a month on the back of the neck on each cat seems to work the best. Here in SoCal we sometimes have a weather condition called the Santa Ana Wind where the humidity goes down into the low teens which is low enough to dry out any fleas or their eggs, but you can't count on that. Diatomous earth sprinkled all over the carpet and left over night will dry out those on the carpet. Don't expect that to be a permanent solution as you will bring in fleas from outside on your socks or pants, so keeping Revolution on the cats is a necessity. I have not had an infestation in several years and at that time the clerk at Petsmart recommended a spray for the carpet and upholstered furniture that did wonders and was allegedly the least poisonous but I can't remember what it was called. I also do not seem to need Revolution during the winter months, at least I don't see any fleas on any of my 3 cats during that time, but as soon as temps hit 70 I start them on their regimen again and I have not seen any fleas in years. My cats are indoor only with a large patio on my 2nd floor apartment  where they practically live, sunning themselves on patio furniture and a tall cat tree and watching the birds. They also have a cat door next to the sliding glass door so I don't have to act like a doorman. These guys have it so good. 

post #29 of 67

I've tried 20 Mule Team Borax (Boraxo) as described years ago, after having a flea infestation on the carpets.  It worked very well, and I haven't seen any fleas since.  I know someone who used Diatomaceous Earth , it worked but it did clog the vacuum cleaner.  I have also used Nitenpyram capsules and it works well, but only kills adult fleas for 1 day at a time.  Lufenuron capsules reportedly kill fleas, eggs and larvae and, it lasts longer.

post #30 of 67

I am a US veterinarian who is also very frustrated with Frontline wasting client's money, we don't even carry it anymore. I recommend Revolution which still works well and I am also seeing resistance developing with Advantage. I flat out tell my clients that Frontline and Advantage are not working any more. It is safe to use Frontline weekly by the way, it is a very safe product. If you are still seeing fleas or scratching you need to use something else and you cannot wait for a whole month. Dr. Shaw

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Care & Grooming
TheCatSite.com › Forums › Our Feline Companions › Care & Grooming › Why Does Frontline and Advantage Not Work For Fleas Now?