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Do cats need vaccinations every year?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

i read an article online that caused me to worry about vaccinations. http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/why-vets-are-getting-away-with-murder/

Now, im not sure if i should keep updating my cats vaccinations, i dont want my cat to get sick because of them. She has her shots that she got the first months of her life, and now she needs to get them updated in march.
 
What do you guys think of vaccinations? Is there proof that they are necessary/unnecessary?
post #2 of 17
Current AAHA/AVMA recommendations for adult cats:

for FVCRP vaccine: no more often than once every 3 years

For rabies vaccine: according to local law (in most places once every 3 years unless you use PureVax, that's annually)

For FeLV: annually for cats at high risk of exposure (not for housecats)

So any vet vaccinating more than that isn't even following the AVMA'a recommendations! :/

Personally I don't vaccinate cats at all after their kitten series. I've had too much trouble with vaccines and cats. But I don't have many people come to my house; if I did I guess I'd have to keep them legal on rabies vaccine.
post #3 of 17

My vet gives my cats the FVRCP and rabies shots every 3 years, but she staggers them so they never get two shots at once. Also, once a cat gets to a certain age (usually in the teens) or if the cat's health has deteriorated to a certain point my vet will recommend the cat no longer get any vaccinations.

post #4 of 17

i don't have any advice for you. but i'm glad you asked this question. i am also curious about others opinions.

 

i do not get vaccinations for my cats. i don't feel they need it since they are STRICTLY indoor cats. NEVER allowed outside. and do not associate with other cats.

i don't feel that my pets need vaccines if i don't get them for myself or my daughter. i know..some ppl will not agree with me. that's okay. everyone has their own opinion.

 

my first cat, Bella, has never been vaccinated..only had a kitten check up for precautionary deworming and was spayed.

my second cat, Sassy, has only have her first set of shots and was spayed.

both of them are now over 3 yrs old.

the newest (and last) addition, Ivee, who is 8 weeks old tomorrow, has yet to be seen by a vet. just brought her home last week.
 

post #5 of 17

I give the kitten vax series, the boosters at one year and no more after that.
 

post #6 of 17
I was vaccinated as a child, and none are required for me as an adult. Vaccines usually provide protection for decades, if not for life. The Rabies Challenge Fund is currently researching the duration of the rabies vaccine. So far, they're up to four or seven years. But there's already research out there indicating it lasts for at least four years.

So rabies is more about local law than anything else. It's not required for cats in this county, so our kitties get it their first year, and that's it. We also provide the distemper vaccination and its 3-week booster the first year, and again, we don't vaccinate further after that.

You can consider having your cats titre-tested, rather than vaccinated. If rabies is required, whether or not the titre test (which would indicate whether the cat actually needs it or not, based on the level of antibodies) works as a substitute, again, is up to local law.

We TNR cats, and we do not provide the FeLV or the FIV vaccine. FeLV vaccine is only about 70% effective anyway, and the FIV will result in them always testing positive for it - and it only protects against a specific strain of FIV that is located in the SE United States, so unless you're in the panhandle of Fl, southern AL, southern MS, southern LA, or SE TX, it doesn't protect that cat against FIV anyway.
post #7 of 17
Like LN6, my cats get the required vaccines but I make sure they are staggered. By law, rabies is a required vaccine, otherwise I would never have one administered to my cats. My 15 year old gets NO vaccines, law or not, and my vet concurs with my thoughts on the matter. I refuse to do the 3 year rabies on my cats but it's a personal choice on my part. This article can break it down in lay terms. My cats receive the non-adjuvanted vaccines for rabies. I insist upon it, but again, that's my personal choice.

http://vetmedicine.about.com/od/veterinaryqa/f/RabiesVaccine.htm
post #8 of 17

My cats are indoor only so I usually give them vaccinations about every three years. Call me a bad kitty mom, but it just seems like a waste if they aren't ever exposed to any other kitties.
 

post #9 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittykisser View Post

My cats are indoor only so I usually give them vaccinations about every three years. Call me a bad kitty mom, but it just seems like a waste if they aren't ever exposed to any other kitties.
 

Why would you be a bad kitty mom for not vaccinating every year? Did you read the article to which the OP linked?

And for more information, there is extensive discussion with more links to studies and information in this thread: http://www.thecatsite.com/t/245463/do-indoor-cats-really-need-vaccines
post #10 of 17

I would prefer not to vaccinate mine anymore. They had their vaccinations as kittens and at 1 year. They are strictly indoor. BUT The adoption agencies always ask if your cats are up to date on shots on their application. I hope not vaccinating anymore won't make it hard to adopt a cat in the future.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kittykisser View Post

My cats are indoor only so I usually give them vaccinations about every three years. Call me a bad kitty mom, but it just seems like a waste if they aren't ever exposed to any other kitties.
 

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by LDG View Post


Why would you be a bad kitty mom for not vaccinating every year? Did you read the article to which the OP linked?

 

 

 

I can actually identify with this sentiment. Up until very recently I thought the FVRCP was an annual vaccine (hey I'm relatively new to the world of felines so cut me some slack!) I did a ton of research on the rabies vaccine because that's the one I perceived as most dangerous and, as it is in most places in the US, is required by law in my home state. But, I just thought they always got the FVRCP at the annual wellness exam. Glad I now know it's a minimum of a 3 year vaccine! 

 

Ultimately, I did decide to vaccinate but asked my vet to give all the shots in the legs and space it so they never get two vaccines at once. For me, this was the best choice. Since I foster kittens it's critical for my residents to be UTD on their shots. But, for a cat who is older, or is STRICTLY indoors, I see why people wouldn't vaccinate after the initial kitten series. I think what shots you give and when are really just based on the living situation. 

 

So, for those who do need to vaccinate (because your cat is indoor/outdoor, because of stray animals coming in and out, or perhaps just because you feel like you should) talk to your vet about leg vaccines. For me anyway, it was a happy medium. 

post #12 of 17

Most human vaccines do NOT provide protection for life - for example a well-known TV presenter got TB because the BCG he had as a 12-yo doesn't last for life.  I had to have a booster when I went to Nepal some years ago, and Nepal and India are hotbeds of strains that are becoming resistant to most antibiotics - not surprising when they (or a faux version) are sold over the counter. 

 

However they are not generally repeated for adults because the diseases they protect against are usually far less serious in adults than in children at least in terms of mortaility, though mumps can be far more serious in adult men than in young boys.  Partly because the flu virus is always mutating there is a list of chronic conditions and people with those can get a free flu vaccine every year - I do as I have asthma.  The elderly can as well - flu can be a far more serious infection for them than for healthy young adults.

 

We have a whooping cough epidemic at present in the UK (several babies have died, about 8,000 cases in 2012 against less than 1,000 in 2011) and mid-term pregnant women have been encouraged to get vaccinated so they can hopefully pass some resistance on to their unborn babies. 

 

With rubella everyone midwifes are tested when they start training to see if they need vaccinating.  Even if one has rubella (as I and most people my age did) the immunity might not last that long.

 

In the UK we still vaccinate cats every year and anyone wanting to board or show their cat cannot do so unless the card is up-to-date.  Good catteries and all shows check that the basic vaccines are up-to-date - they are not interested in the FeLV vaccine, or in bordatella or any others.

 

And even if you don't vaccinate every year, the cat should still get a vet-check every year.  Mine check mouth, ears, eyes, coat, listen to their heart, palpate the abdomen, and weigh them.  The weight is recorded and their computer system will display a graph of weight against date.  Actually they may do more but that's what I've seen them doing.  If the cat is being friendly they also give them a cuddle.

post #13 of 17

Our cat is purely an indoors cat, but she does get boarded from time to time so there is the potential to interact with other cats. Plus most boarding places require annual shots. There are some shots that need to be done annually and some that need to be done every three years.

 

As a cat gets older, there are some vaccines that they don't need to be given as often because if you are getting shots done regularly throughout the cat's life, the cat will start to develop their own immunity. The important thing is to get your cat checked by a vet every year and ask them about what vaccinations they need. Vets have a lot more knowledge than that article would suggest. I don't put much faith in the article that the original poster posted. 

post #14 of 17

This is a loaded question and it has a lot of very extreme opinions.  Just like "Should parents be forced to vaccinate their kids?"  There are sides for and against it and both have good points, but also both arguments have crazy and misguided information.  It's the same way with pets.  Both arguements have good points.  But, you can't ever have it kenneled or take it to the groomers without these records and many towns and cities make you do this and register your pet.  You can be fined if you do not.  I say it is a personal choice.

post #15 of 17

I have 3 indoor cats. I do not have contact with other animals (I do not do rescue, volunteer at a shelter, foster etc.); so my cats are not exposed to any diseases that I may bring into my home.  So based on that, my vet told me that other than the initial kitten shots, my cats do not need to have annual vaccinations.  Of course if I were to take them traveling, I would get them vacinnated, especially against rabies.

post #16 of 17

 My 2cents.gif, is as follows: All my cats, get vaccines every single year. The exotic hybrids are given only "killed/modified live" vaccines. The pure domestics are given: rabies, FVRCP, and FeLV vaccines yearly. Two of the domestics are indoor/outdoor and one has direct contact with the hybrids, who, in my experience have real wacko immune systems. Plus, I do foster/rehoming. As well as, working in a shelter and vets offices, on some weekends.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by My3Grrlz View Post

i don't have any advice for you. but i'm glad you asked this question. i am also curious about others opinions.

 

i do not get vaccinations for my cats. i don't feel they need it since they are STRICTLY indoor cats. NEVER allowed outside. and do not associate with other cats.

i don't feel that my pets need vaccines. if i don't don't feel they are needed for myself or my daughter..why should i get them for my pets?
i know....some ppl will not agree with me. that's okay. everyone has their own opinion.

 

my first cat, Bella, has never been vaccinated..only had a kitten check for precautionary deworming and was spayed.

my second cat, Sassy, has only have her first set of shots and was spayed.

both of them are now over 3 yrs old.

the newest (and last) addition, Ivee, who is 8 weeks old tomorrow, has yet to be seen by a vet. just brought her home last week.
 

 

for some reason my reply was not put thru for a bit, yesterday..i am not sure anyone saw it..but that's okay.
i am just reposting since i have something to add to it, after reading other replies.
 

i do see how much controversy there is about this subject. i am glad i can get other peoples opinions..altho it doesn't really change my mind about how i care for/raise my cats.

 

let me just state that i use to work for a Chiropractor...so i got a lot of information about vaccines for humans and pets. he didn't even get vaccines for his dogs and they lived long happy lives.
i am actually glad to see that someone has the same thought..to a point..as me regarding indoor cats not being vaccinated.

my first cat has never been vaccinated..as i stated in a reply above. i went to a vet that did not require animals to be vaccinated in order to be spayed/neutered. i may end up checking with them and see if their policy still stands..for Ivee, when it is time to get her spayed.

my second cat..who i got at 7 months was vaccinated with the first kitten shots and spayed by the previous owner. she has not had any vaccinations since..and i don't plan on getting any others.

 

at this point..THE ONLY THING that would make me get all 3 up to date vaccinations is the fact that Ivee's momma POSSIBLY had the stupid herpes virus. if so..there may be 8 cats that have been exposed to it. kaioken.gif i do have a thread about this already tho.

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