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Longest lived / healthiest breeds?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I was wondering what the longest lived and healthiest breeds are???   I've heard that this is true of Siamese and also wonder if a cat is only part Siamese, enough to have the coloration, would that confer the health benefits?

post #2 of 27
My first cats (supposedly their mother was Siamese. One was quite loud and talkative so I believe it) both lived to be 21. I don't know about "healthy", as Siamese seem to be prone to sensitive tummies and pica, but they certainly are long-lived.

As for whether a pointed domestic would be any longer-lived, I guess it depends how far back the Siamese is in his family tree.
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 

21, that's amazing!   I wish I had had that much time with my first two - I lost them at 14 and 15 and even though I know that's a perfectly respectable cat life span I wish I'd had more time with them.  I guess we all do.   The universe seems to throw cats me ever so often though, so I'm not sure how much choice I get in these things catman.gif

post #4 of 27
Since most pointed domestics are not Siamese mixes I doubt being pointed has anything to do with it

Most breeds live well into their teens and twenties, no different to moggies
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hi Missymotus, so the gene(s) for pointedness can be separate from Siamese lineage?   Over on the rescue board I noticed pictures of a couple of lynx point looking cats and wondered how that came about. 

post #6 of 27
The CP gene is recessive so can be carried forever, until it meets up with another carrier then kittens can be pointed
post #7 of 27

My stepdad's Persian lived to be 19. He got some age related issues during his last year but besides that he was a healthy one. Color was blue, though I don't think it has anything to do with age. Second oldest was my grandpa's black bicolor moggie, he had to be pts because of cancer at 18. I can't think of any breed which would outlive another one due to the breed, cats are still so similar no matter what breed, unlike dogs.

 

Lynx point=tabby point outside US.

post #8 of 27

Persians are actually supposed to be one of the shorter lifespan breeds due to their pushed in muzzles.  frown.gif  I hope not!!  But, I have heard of some living to be 19, 20, 22 yrs old!  *Fingers crossed my Persian girls live that long!*  Maine Coons are supposed to be a long life span cat, too.  I've heard of them living 25-27 years, even 30 in a few cases!  Birmans are also supposed to be a hearty breed.  I think it's really the activeness of the cat that determine it's lifespan, not really the breed.  So that is why they say Simese, Birmans, etc because they are known for being somewhat acrobatic and active. 

post #9 of 27

Birmans are not active or acrobatic, and many come with optional brains according to the breeders I know laughing02.gif

post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by missymotus View Post

Birmans are not active or acrobatic, and many come with optional brains according to the breeders I know laughing02.gif

Well you haven't met my Paige... She is VERY acrobatic, active and highly intelligent.  She figures things out rather quickly.  As do most Birmans from breeders I know.  I guess it depends on who you talk to?  Some say Persians aren't very smart.  I know this isn't true.  They may not be "street smart" because they weren't bred for outdoor life but they are very intelligent.  Mine are fairly active themselves, not at all the "decorative pillow of a cat" they are described as a lot.

post #11 of 27

Perhaps your are more active than most, can't see them keeping up with Siamese and other foreign breeds myself - racing around doing the wall of death in every room.

post #12 of 27

Paige does some running like a wild woman... But, she's more of an actual acrobatic... she does lots of cool leaps, turns, contortionism, high jumps, stuff like that.   She can hold her own for sure! ;)  She has beaten many a simese in local agility contests!!  The Persians don't come close to keeping up with her on that level but Phoebe likes to be up high and jump which is unusual for a Persian. 

post #13 of 27

Persians were often very shortlived because of PKD - Polycyctic Kidney Disease.  It probably also lead to the small litters they had as if two carriers mated any kitten that inherited it from both parents would die before birth and be reabsorbed.  It was also an issue in some lines in breeds that had been crossed at some point in time with Persians - British Shorthair for example.

 

However with the advent for first ultrasound screening and then a gene test, it should have been eradicated by now, at least in cats from breeders who have taken the trouble to test.  Testing caused a big hoo-haa when it first came along but that has died away.

 

Lots of info here, but do remember - all these inherited diseases occur in domestic cats, and in many other species.  I know a woman who died from PKD though she made it to her late 70s or 80s.

 

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd.html

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd_riskinbreeds.html

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd_negative_register.html

http://www.gccfcats.org/pdf/BreedingPolicy.pdf

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/index.php

post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 

My dearly departed Buddy was a golden Persian and he's the one who lived to be 15.   He was incredibly robust and active - he was pet quality so he had a muzzle that wasn't completely flat and a bit of non-Persian personality and that suited me fine.  He didn't jump much though.  I truly think if he hadn't gotten cancer he had the stamina to go quite a few more years - he had maybe one white hair on him at 15.    I'm not sure whether I'll get another Persian in the future or not....there's always the temptation to recreate the cat you lost which for me I think would keep the grief alive.   But then again who knows....I'm doing the rescue thing now so I may not get this hypothetical cat for a few years yet. 

 

ETA: just saw OrientalSlave's post, Buddy did get early stage kidney disease at 14 but it was progressing very slowly, it wasn't PKD though. 

post #15 of 27

Yes, PKD is a very specific type of kidney disease.  If you ever get another Persian make sure it will be clear of PKD - if for example the father and both of the maternal grandparents were tested clear then the kittens would be.

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

Yes, PKD is a very specific type of kidney disease.  If you ever get another Persian make sure it will be clear of PKD - if for example the father and both of the maternal grandparents were tested clear then the kittens would be.

FIFé (or at least the Finnish branch) won't register the litter if both sire and dam haven't been DNA tested PKD-negative, it's been like that for years now. There are other breeds with similar rules, like ABYs tested for PRA, MCOs (and Raggies?) for HCM and Norwegians have something new I can't remember at the moment. Testing Brits for PKD is recommended, most breeders here test them.

 

The Persian I mentioned was also pet quality, too long nose, but shorter than my Brits have. He had been to a show once just for fun, but obviously didn't do very well. He was 5 years older than me, so no PKD or other similar tests were made back then (he was born 1980).

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

Persians were often very shortlived because of PKD - Polycyctic Kidney Disease.  It probably also lead to the small litters they had as if two carriers mated any kitten that inherited it from both parents would die before birth and be reabsorbed.  It was also an issue in some lines in breeds that had been crossed at some point in time with Persians - British Shorthair for example.

 

However with the advent for first ultrasound screening and then a gene test, it should have been eradicated by now, at least in cats from breeders who have taken the trouble to test.  Testing caused a big hoo-haa when it first came along but that has died away.

 

Lots of info here, but do remember - all these inherited diseases occur in domestic cats, and in many other species.  I know a woman who died from PKD though she made it to her late 70s or 80s.

 

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd.html

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd_riskinbreeds.html

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/infosheets/pkd/pkd_negative_register.html

http://www.gccfcats.org/pdf/BreedingPolicy.pdf

http://www.fabcats.org/breeders/index.php

Yes,which is why I went through a breeder who genetically screens every cat.  Mine are negative on all the bad things Persians are prone to.  However, it should be noted that just because they are negative, doesn't mean you shouldn't keep an eye on them.  Persians are also prone to crystals in their bladder and that can be painful and lead to CRF.  Especially around the 5 yr mark, you need to have them screened at least once a year to make sure their bladders and urine are OK.  My Persians have always been very healthy, knock on wood!  But there are a lot of things Persians have to be checked for and owners need to stay on top of and not just have the attitude "Well, the breeders said they were negative for this so I don't need to worry about it."  That is not the case.

post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 

What about teeth issues for Persians?   Do they tend to have more dental problems?

post #19 of 27

I haven't heard of them having dental problems, but I've heard Siamese and Orientals having them because of a too narrow muzzle. I think Persians might be more prone to underbite, but if it's not severe I don't see it affecting to much anything (my Foldie has slight underbite but it hasn't affected him in anyway. It's pretty much just cosmetic fault (a disqualifying one in FIFé shows). Some BSH lines are more prone to tartar than others, but that might be the case in other breeds or moggies too (as it's not related to their facial structure).

post #20 of 27

There is no doubt in my mind that cats (all cats) vary hugely in their long-term dental health.  I had a moggie who needed regular dentals from 3, and another who didn't have any problems until he was 15 and unfortunately not well enough for his bad tooth to be extracted.  My pedigree Oriental boy has just had his first dental at 5 1/2 and needed two teeth out - wish we had had him done 6 months ago and the extractions might have been avoided. 

 

It's also very dependant on diet.  My boy's sister has beautiful teeth, but she eats a raw chicken wing most days.  If only her brother would...  My female kitten is into wings as well.

post #21 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by OrientalSlave View Post

 My pedigree Oriental boy has just had his first dental at 5 1/2 and needed two teeth out - 

 

It's also very dependant on diet.  My boy's sister has beautiful teeth, but she eats a raw chicken wing most days.  If only her brother would...  My female kitten is into wings as well.

Can you still show your OSH boy (if you were showing him before)? FIFé also has dental removals as disqualifying fault, not sure if it applies to neuters, but for intacts it does. 

 

Luna (intact BLH) tends to have her gums flare up when she's in heat, pregnant or has kittens. Last year she had antibiotics which cleared it up nicely, but I did make an adjustment to her diet and added some junk food in it. She only eats dry food (except when she has kittens, for some reason then she also accepts wet food), so I added RC:s oral hygiene-stuff to her regular healthier food and surprisingly it has worked for her so far which I honestly wasn't expecting.

post #22 of 27

He could be shown - I've seen GCCF reports with 'level gums'!  As it happens whilst he's a fantastic pet he's not show quality - wrong eye colour - and I don't think he'll enjoy a show enough to go as a pedigree pet,

post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthernGlow View Post

Can you still show your OSH boy (if you were showing him before)?

 

I have a toothless neuter girl, teeth removed at 18 months, she's coming up to 6 and still being shown. A cat with a sore mouth wouldn't make it through vetting (all cats are vet checked before being benched), but if they are well they can be shown.

post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 

Thanks you guys!  It's interesting to hear the experiences of those who have or deal with the breeds.   It sounds like there's no guarantees especially for dental!   I'm getting pet insurance next time for sure.

post #25 of 27

Pet insurance can be an expensive minefield if you are not careful.  There are all sorts of different policies with different conditions.  To be honest I think that there is a lot to be said for self-insurance - you set aside what a good pet insurance policy would cost every month.  My friend (I am in the UK) found that her cat's dental was only covered when he had extractions.  Just cleaning was deamed preventative so wasn't covered.

 

I am very lucky.  I go to a fairly large and busy vets with plenty of different fairly young vets who keep up-to-date, and they are very reasonably priced as well, plus I am financially very secure so I have never insured.

post #26 of 27
My girls dental was just random and wouldn't have been covered by insurance anyway

Insurance often isn't worth the expense, self insurance as OS put it is usually a better way to go. For myself with breeding cats too, it's useless on breeding cats.
post #27 of 27

I don't have insurances for my cats either. I do keep money aside in case of emergency and other stuff like that (only allowed to be used for cat related costs).

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